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BAC Jun 2024 35.000 call

OPR - OPR Delayed price. Currency in USD
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0.53000.0000 (0.00%)
As of 12:15PM EST. Market open.
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Previous close0.5300
Open0.5000
Bid0.5100
Ask0.5300
Strike35.00
Expiry date2024-06-21
Day's range0.4900 - 0.5300
Contract rangeN/A
Volume9
Open interest51.91k
  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Bank of America pays $12 mln fine for misreporting mortgage data

    Bank of America agreed to pay a $12 million fine to settle U.S. regulatory charges it routinely submitted inaccurate information about mortgage applicants to the federal government, violating a law that thousands of mortgage lenders have followed for decades. The U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said on Tuesday that more than 400 loan officers at the second-largest U.S. bank failed to ask applicants required questions about their race, ethnicity and sex, and then falsely reported that the applicants chose not to respond. Failing to accurately report demographic data violates the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, a 1975 law that helps regulators assess whether lenders are serving their communities' housing needs and not engaged in discriminatory lending, the CFPB said.

  • Bloomberg

    Bank of America to Pay $12 Million Over Reporting of False Mortgage Data

    (Bloomberg) -- Bank of America Corp. agreed to pay $12 million in fines for submitting false mortgage-lending information to the US government, regulators said.Most Read from BloombergCharlie Munger, Who Helped Buffett Build Berkshire, Dies at 99Musk’s Cybertruck Is Already a Production Nightmare for TeslaHamas Releases 12 Hostages Despite Claims of Truce ViolationsBillions Wiped Out as Stock-Safety Trade on Wall Street MisfiresTreasury Yields Slide as Fedspeak Fuels Pivot Bets: Markets WrapFrom

  • Reuters

    Bank of America pays $12 million fine for misreporting mortgage data

    (Reuters) -Bank of America agreed to pay a $12 million fine to settle U.S. regulatory charges it routinely submitted inaccurate information about mortgage applicants to the federal government, violating a law that thousands of mortgage lenders have followed for decades. The U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said on Tuesday that more than 400 loan officers at the second-largest U.S. bank failed to ask applicants required questions about their race, ethnicity and sex, and then falsely reported that the applicants chose not to respond. Failing to accurately report demographic data violates the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, a 1975 law that helps regulators assess whether lenders are serving their communities' housing needs and not engaged in discriminatory lending, the CFPB said.