BAS.DE - BASF SE

XETRA - XETRA Delayed price. Currency in EUR
68.82
+0.44 (+0.64%)
As of 9:50AM CET. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close68.38
Open68.76
Bid68.76 x 139300
Ask68.84 x 16500
Day's range68.75 - 69.00
52-week range55.64 - 74.61
Volume165,657
Avg. volume2,665,768
Market cap63B
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.27
PE ratio (TTM)6.95
EPS (TTM)9.90
Earnings date28 Feb 2020
Forward dividend & yield3.20 (4.70%)
Ex-dividend date2019-05-06
1y target estN/A
  • ‘Post-Chemical World’ Takes Shape as Agribusiness Goes Green
    Bloomberg

    ‘Post-Chemical World’ Takes Shape as Agribusiness Goes Green

    (Bloomberg) -- Agribusiness is increasingly turning to natural and sustainable alternatives to chemicals as consumers rebuff genetically modified foods and concerns grow over Big Ag’s role in climate change.At the heart of the trend are innovations that harness beneficial microorganisms in the soil, including seed-coatings of naturally occurring bacteria and fungi that can do the same work as traditional chemicals, from warding off pests to helping plants flourish, according to a global patent study by research firm GreyB Services.“Both entrepreneurs and investors are saying, ‘Hey, the writing is on the wall, we’re entering a post-chemical world,’” said Rob LeClerc, chief executive officer of AgFunder, an online venture-capital platform. “The seed companies who have billions in market cap are like ‘We need to do something,’ and everyone recognizes the opportunity.”Much of the handwringing over farm chemicals stems from the recent fate of glyphosate, the most ubiquitous weedkiller ever. Regulators around the world are tightening up rules around using the chemical, including Europe and Mexico. Meanwhile, thousands of lawsuits that could result in billions of dollars in penalties are pending against Bayer AG over whether its glyphosate-containing product, Roundup, caused cancer. Bayer insists it’s safe, and some government agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency say it isn’t likely to cause cancer in humans.The global fertilizer and pesticide market is around $240 billion, and grows 2% to 3% a year, according to Ben Belldegrun, a managing partner at Pontifax AgTech, a company that invests in food and agriculture technology. While so-called biologicals including biofertilizers, biopesticides and biostimulants are just 2% of that market, those have been growing closer to 15% a year for the past five years, Belldegrun said.Pressure for less chemical-intensive farming methods is coming from retailers like Walmart Inc., non-governmental organizations and consumers, who are throwing more dollars toward organic and other niche foods with environmental or animal welfare claims.As population increases worldwide, the demand for agricultural products is projected to grow 15% over the next decade with no change in the amount of land available for farming, according to a joint report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization.“There’s a growing world population and how are we going to feed all of these people?” asked Craig Forney, assistant director for licensing and business development at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa. “At the same time, we want to protect the environment. We need to use land better and use the resources better.”The answer, Forney said, is “intensified agricultural production to increase productivity of land and do it with minimal chemical support.”Patents give owners the exclusive right to an invention, and can indicate both where research funding is being spent and where companies or universities expect to generate revenue in the future.Companies like BASF SE, Bayer and Syngenta AG have patents on products using naturally-occurring microbes to help crops flourish even when there is low water availability, according to GreyB’s analysis. The microbes can act as catalysts to encourage growth. Biological-based fungicides and insecticides can also help reduce crop damage from insects, slugs and fungi.“Seed-applied biological products can extend the window of disease and pest protection, while some also provide alternate modes of action that can reduce the build-up of resistance, aid with nutrient management and reduce plant stress,” said Chris Judd, BASF’s global strategic marketing manager for Seed Treatment, Inoculants and Biologicals.Evonik Industries AG, Altair Nanotechnologies Inc., Covestro AG and startup Indigo AG have been active in obtaining patents and publishing research in the area of using microbes, as have universities like China’s Zhejiang University and Nanjing Agricultural University, according to GreyB.Likewise, thousands of patents are being issued to companies like BASF, Bayer and Dow Inc. for more natural ways of managing pests including pheromones that deter breeding and reflective mulches, instead of chemical-based insecticides.Germany’s Bayer, which bought agriculture chemical giant Monsanto Co. in 2018, sees “high growth potential” for biologicals, citing a challenging regulatory environment for chemicals and a growing emphasis on sustainability in agriculture. Bayer has a research and development team solely focused on them. The company also is hunting for partnerships to boost its portfolio. Benoit Hartmann, head of biologics at Bayer, said the increased investments show how the science around microbes has matured in recent years.In 2013, BASF acquired seed-treatment supplier Becker Underwood, which helped the company become a leader in biological agents to fight bacteria and fungi. Judd said the company sees demand for biologicals increasing but maintains that they need “to be compatible with an increasing array of chemistries and to have the ability to survive on the seed for adequate periods.”The increased patenting reflects a trend of researchers looking for ways to help promote organic and non-GMO farming, said Nicole Kling, a patent agent with Nixon Peabody who specializes in the biotechnology field.With biologicals, “You’re not introducing chemicals with the scare quotes around it,” Kling said. “You’re not doing anything that would harm the agricultural workers.”Researchers and companies are looking for new solutions for farming with less chemicals because organic farming, the most popular alternative to modern conventional farming, often results in lower yields. Still, demand for food continues increasing. Iowa State and other universities around the world, using government funding or in partnership with companies, are rushing to deal with those competing demands.“The hope is someday in the future they will merge and you will have organic and non-GMO products that are just as productive as Big Ag,” Forney said.That’s where things like precision agriculture to tailor the application of nutrients, artificial intelligence to monitor soil conditions and the development of new plant hybrids come in.Other emerging techniques that could boost yields while helping farmers use less chemicals is artificial intelligence, which is being used to analyze which seeds and crops can yield the most based on changing soil conditions and weather patterns on a farm. The promise of quantum computers would let companies use massive computing power to develop and analyze new seeds and fertilizers.Scientists also are developing new plant varieties, with applications for new varieties up 9% in 2018, according to the World Intellectual Property Organization. China led the growth, with more than a quarter of the applications for new varieties.Much of the research in crop biotech is centered in the U.S., China, Germany, Japan and South Korea, though it’s being adapted to meet local conditions in Africa, Latin America and Asia, according to WIPO, an agency of the U.N.Demand for more food will be greatest in Africa, India and the Middle East. In the developing world, there is little food scarcity because “we did good things with all that ‘better living through chemistry,’” Kling said, referring to a play on an old DuPont motto. It has come at a cost, though.“We’re starting to see some of the effects of that -- all of this wonderful industrialization has contributed to climate change,” Kling said. “We’re starting to see people swing back in the other direction.”(Adds executive comment in fifteenth paragraph)To contact the reporters on this story: Lydia Mulvany in Chicago at lmulvany2@bloomberg.net;Susan Decker in Washington at sdecker1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jon Morgan at jmorgan97@bloomberg.net, ;James Attwood at jattwood3@bloomberg.net, Elizabeth WassermanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 2-U.S. Senate committee backs Russia energy bills, delays vote on sanctions 'from hell'

    WASHINGTON/VIENNA, Dec 12 (Reuters) - Underscoring U.S. lawmakers' continuing unhappiness with Russia, a Senate committee on Wednesday advanced legislation seeking to hamper Russian energy pipelines and boosting NATO but delayed voting on a measure nicknamed the "sanctions bill from hell" that would punish Moscow for meddling in the 2016 U.S. election. The Senate Foreign Relations Committee approved four energy bills, including the "Energy Security Cooperation with Allied Partners in Europe Act of 2019," which opposes Russia's Nord Stream 2 pipeline, encourages NATO countries not to buy Russian gas and expedites U.S. natural gas exports.

  • Europe Set to Overhaul Its Entire Economy in Green Deal Push
    Bloomberg

    Europe Set to Overhaul Its Entire Economy in Green Deal Push

    (Bloomberg) -- The European Union is gearing up for the world’s most ambitious push against climate change with a radical overhaul of its economy.At a summit in Brussels next week, EU leaders will commit to cutting net greenhouse-gas emissions to zero by 2050, according to a draft of their joint statement for the Dec. 12-13 meeting. To meet this target, the EU will promise more green investment and adjust all of its policy making accordingly.“If our common goal is to be a climate-neutral continent in 2050, we have to act now,” Ursula von der Leyen, president of the European Commission, told a United Nations climate conference on Monday. “It’s a generational transition we have to go through.”The commission, the EU’s regulatory arm, will have the job of drafting the rules that would transform the European economy once national leaders have signed off on the climate goals for 2050. The wording of the first draft summit communique, which may still change, reflects an initial set of ideas to be floated by the commission on the eve of the leaders’ gathering.The EU plan, set to be approved as the high-profile United Nations summit in Madrid winds up, would put the bloc ahead of other major emitters. Countries including China, India and Japan have yet to translate voluntary pledges under the 2015 Paris climate accord into binding national measures. U.S. President Donald Trump has said he’ll pull the U.S. out of the Paris agreement.In a pitch of her Green Deal to member states and the European Parliament on Dec. 11, von der Leyen is set to promise a set of measures to reach the net-zero emissions target, affecting sectors from agriculture to energy production. It will include a thorough analysis on how to toughen the current 40% goal to reduce emissions by 2030 to 50% or even 55%, according to an EU document obtained by Bloomberg News.Make It IrreversibleIn the next step, the commission will propose an EU law in March that would “make the transition to climate neutrality irreversible,” von der Leyen told the UN meeting. She said the measure will include “a farm-to-fork strategy and a biodiversity strategy” and will extend the scope of emissions trading.The EU Emissions Trading System is the world’s largest cap-and-trade market for greenhouse gases. It imposes pollution caps on around 12,000 facilities in sectors from refining to cement production, including Royal Dutch Shell Plc and BASF SE. Von der Leyen eyes the inclusion of road transport into the market and cutting the number of free emission permits for airlines.Some of the transportation industry’s biggest polluters have already stepped up efforts to reduce their environmental impact. In June, France’s Airbus SE, its U.S. rival Boeing Co. and other aviation companies pledged to reduce net CO2 emissions by half in 2050 compared with 2005 levels. EasyJet Plc, the U.K.-based discount airline, has promised to offset all of its carbon emissions by planting trees and supporting solar-energy projects, while Air France will take similar steps on its domestic routes.Germany’s Volkswagen AG, the world’s largest automaker, aims to become CO2 neutral by 2050, while Daimler AG plans to reach that target for its Mercedes-Benz luxury car lineup by 2039.To ensure that coal-reliant Poland doesn’t veto the climate goals next week, EU leaders will pledge an “enabling framework” that will include financial support, according to the document, dated Dec. 2. The commission has estimated that additional investment on energy and infrastructure of as much as 290 billion euros a year may be required after 2030 to meet the targets.The EU leaders will also debate the bloc’s next long-term budget next week. The current proposal would commit at least $300 billion in public funds for climate initiatives, or at least a quarter of the bloc’s entire budget for the period between 2021 and 2027.(Updates with details on draft sumit communique from fourth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Ania Nussbaum, Siddharth Philip and Christoph Rauwald.To contact the reporters on this story: Ewa Krukowska in Brussels at ekrukowska@bloomberg.net;Nikos Chrysoloras in Brussels at nchrysoloras@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chad Thomas at cthomas16@bloomberg.net, Chris ReiterFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Exclusive: Lone Star in exclusive talks to buy BASF construction chemicals unit -sources
    Reuters

    Exclusive: Lone Star in exclusive talks to buy BASF construction chemicals unit -sources

    Lone Star has entered exclusive negotiations to buy BASF's construction chemicals business as the German chemicals company seeks to focus on more profitable operations, people close to the matter said. The private equity firm vied with a consortium comprising buyout groups Cinven - which owns peer Chryso - and Bain for the world's largest maker of chemical additives for concrete, they said. A BASF spokesman confirmed that the company had proceeded to talk with only one bidder but declined to comment further.

  • Exclusive: Lone Star in exclusive talks to buy BASF construction chemicals unit - sources
    Reuters

    Exclusive: Lone Star in exclusive talks to buy BASF construction chemicals unit - sources

    Lone Star has entered exclusive negotiations to buy BASF's construction chemicals business as the German chemicals company seeks to focus on more profitable operations, people close to the matter said. The private equity firm vied with a consortium comprising buyout groups Cinven - which owns peer Chryso - and Bain for the world's largest maker of chemical additives for concrete, they said. A BASF spokesman confirmed that the company had proceeded to talk with only one bidder but declined to comment further.

  • Germany's BASF starts building $10-billion petrochemical project in China
    Reuters

    Germany's BASF starts building $10-billion petrochemical project in China

    German chemical giant BASF has begun construction of its $10-billion (£7.8 billion) integrated petrochemicals project in China's southern province of Guangdong, the company said in a statement on Saturday. The project based in the city of Zhanjiang will be China's first wholly foreign-owned chemicals complex, for which a framework agreement was signed in January. It will primarily produce engineering plastics and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), and some petrochemical products widely used in automotive, electronics and new energy vehicles industries.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 2-Poland's anti-monopoly body fines France's Engie over Nord Stream 2

    Poland's anti-monopoly body UOKiK said on Friday it had fined France's Engie Energy, one of five European firms responsible for financing gas pipeline Nord Stream 2, 40 million euros ($44 million) as part of proceedings against Gazprom. UOKiK said Engie had refused to provide it with documents and information about the agreements it signed with Russian gas supplier Gazprom.

  • BASF invites final private equity bids for construction chems unit - sources
    Reuters

    BASF invites final private equity bids for construction chems unit - sources

    German chemicals group BASF has asked the two remaining private-equity suitors of its 3 billion euro (£2.6 billion) construction chemicals unit for final bids by Friday, three people close to the matter said. A consortium comprising buyout groups Cinven and Bain is expected to table an offer, as is rival investor Lone Star, which is bidding alone, the three people said on Thursday. The sale has been long and drawn out as BASF put the construction chemicals business on the block a year ago to focus on more profitable operations.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 1-LME to launch lithium committee including Tesla, Albemarle

    The London Metal Exchange is planning to create a committee to represent the interests of producers and users of lithium, a key component in electric car batteries, it said on Tuesday. Announcing the committee during LME Week, an annual gathering in London of metals consumers, producers, traders and brokers from around the world, the LME said it was likely to include representatives of nine companies. The LME is planning a lithium contract, and in June selected Fastmarkets to provide a reference price, but has given no timeline for an official launch.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LMEWEEK-Cobalt market to avoid shortage despite Congo mine closure - Nornickel

    Cobalt supply will remain robust despite a price slide that has already led to the closure of a major mine, Russia's Norilsk Nickel said, as most is produced as a byproduct of more buoyant metals like nickel and copper. Prices of the battery metal surged in 2017 and 2018 on expectations for an electric vehicle revolution, but have fallen this year due to excessive supply and the impact of the U.S.-China trade war. In August global mining and trade giant Glencore said it would shutter its Mutanda mine in the Democratic Republic of Congo from year-end for two years due to low cobalt prices.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LMEWEEK-LME's planned lithium committee to include Tesla and Albemarle

    The London Metal Exchange (LME) said on Tuesday it would create a committee to represent the interests and views of producers and users of lithium, a key ingredient in batteries. The LME said the committee was likely to include representatives of nine companies including vehicle makers Tesla and Jaguar Land Rover and lithium producers and processors Tianqi Lithium Australia, BASF and Albemarle. The LME plans a lithium contract, but has given no timeline for an official launch.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Closing snapshot: Peak uncertainty? Peak S&P!

    * LVMH confirms interest in acquiring luxury jeweller Tiffany Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Thyagaraju Adinarayan. BNP Paribas economist William de Vijlder says in his blog today that it could be tempting to make that case given that the trade war and Brexit seem to be going towards some kind of resolution. In Europe, the STOXX 600 is just below 400 points, that's a January 2018 high, so not bad given the ongoing Brexit fudge and the macro gloom.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Ruling out Corbyn? Not so fast

    * LVMH confirms interest in acquiring luxury jeweller Tiffany Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Thyagaraju Adinarayan. When Brexit was considered a risk rather than a probability? As the EU agreed today to delay Brexit again, the UK prime minister is pushing harder for a general election.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 1-Polymer firm Synthomer expects profit hit in tough market

    Polymer maker Synthomer Plc predicted on Friday it would fall short of market expectations for underlying pretax profit this year as a slowing global economy hammers chemical producers globally, sending its shares 13% lower. The company, which added that it expects a slower business environment to continue into next year, said underlying pretax profit would be about 10% below both last year as well as its current estimate of the consensus of market expectations, which it put at 135.3 million pounds ($173.82 million). The warning came a day after industry heavyweights BASF and Dow Inc posted sharp falls in profit due to a sharp drop in demand for chemicals used in plastics.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 2-LafargeHolcim optimistic about 2020 building industry

    LafargeHolcim expects the construction industry to remain buoyant next yeardespite the downturn dragging on other sectors of the global economy. Other problems, like Britain's protracted exit from the European Union, could even help by stimulating British spending on infrastructure projects, he said as LafargeHolcim reported results in line with expectations. "Many industries at the moment are reporting negative volumes, most prominently in the automotive sector, we don't have that," Jenisch told reporters.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Closing snapshot: Draghi leaves on a high, UK election buzz

    * European shares close higher * Q3 earnings support sentiment * PMIs stagnate * Last ECB meeting for Draghi Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Danilo Masoni. Reach him on Messenger to share your thoughts on market moves: danilo.masoni.thomsonreuters.com@reuters.net CLOSING SNAPSHOT: DRAGHI LEAVES ON A HIGH, ELECTION BUZZ (1535 GMT) European stocks have closed comprehensively higher on what was quite an intense session in terms of corporate news and during which Super Mario gave his last presser as ECB chief.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Who's betting on a correction by 2020?

    * European shares trade higher * Q3 earnings support sentiment * PMIs stagnate * Last ECB meeting for Draghi Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Danilo Masoni. "We think European equities are poorly positioned, even if the euro area is somewhat on the Value side", SocGen analysts believe, noting that shares of the old continent have a poor earnings profile, lack global champions and are in a bad place if the trade war gets worse or the U.S. economy slows down. Here's SocGen forecast for Q3 2020: (Julien Ponthus) ***** LET'S NOT HOLD OUR BREATH FOR LAGARDE (1506 GMT) Looking at today's gloomy PMIs, there's a case to despair when considering that ECB launched a new round of stimulus last month, cutting rates deeper in negative rate and relaunching a bond purchase scheme, but Euro zone business activity stagnated in October.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Let's not hold our breath for Lagarde

    * European shares trade higher * Q3 earnings support sentiment * PMIs stagnate * Last ECB meeting for Draghi Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Danilo Masoni. Reach him on Messenger to share your thoughts on market moves: danilo.masoni.thomsonreuters.com@reuters.net LET'S NOT HOLD OUR BREATH FOR LAGARDE (1506 GMT) Looking at today's gloomy PMIs, there's a case to despair when considering that ECB launched a new round of stimulus last month, cutting rates deeper in negative rate and relaunching a bond purchase scheme, but Euro zone business activity stagnated in October. How much more can Lagarde do when she takes over from Draghi when interest rates are already below zero, while the ghost of a recession is always behind the corner?

  • BASF's next battery chemical investment likely in Germany - CEO in Manager Magazin
    Reuters

    BASF's next battery chemical investment likely in Germany - CEO in Manager Magazin

    Germany's BASF will likely pick Germany as the site for its next plant to produce chemicals for batteries used in electric cars, the group's CEO told Manager Magazin. BASF is building a factory to make cathode materials for batteries in Harjavalta, Finland, close to a nickel and cobalt refinery of raw materials partner Norilsk Nickel . This is part of a larger 400 million euro (£345 million) investment plan to serve the European market for batteries that go into electric and hybrid vehicles.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-We bet Draghi's tie will scream: "Spend it already!"

    * European shares trade higher * Q3 earnings support sentiment * PMIs stagnate * Last ECB meeting for Draghi Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Danilo Masoni. Chris Bailey, Raymond James' European Strategist, believes those results provide an insight into why investors should start looking with more favour to the unloved European equity space.

  • BASF operating profit dives 24% as trade disputes weigh
    Reuters

    BASF operating profit dives 24% as trade disputes weigh

    Operating income at Germany's BASF dropped 24% during July-September as uncertainty over trade disputes weighed on prices for its basic petrochemicals and foam ingredients. BASF, whose products include vitamins, foams for car seats, engineering plastics and superabsorbers for diapers, reaffirmed earlier projections that adjusted full-year EBIT would be as much as 30% below the year-ago numbers. CEO Brudermueller is trying to cut costs at the group's large integrated chemical complexes around the globe, while divesting businesses that are not closely connected with that production network, such as oil and gas as well as BASF's pigments and construction chemicals businesses.

  • BASF weighs $4 billion Indian chemicals complex with partners
    Reuters

    BASF weighs $4 billion Indian chemicals complex with partners

    German chemicals maker BASF is teaming up with partners to study the feasibility of a petrochemical complex in India worth up to $4 billion, which would be the world's first to be fully powered by renewable energy. BASF said on Thursday it had signed a memorandum of understanding with Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC), Adani Group and Borealis AG to further evaluate a collaboration to build the chemical site in Mundra, in India's Gujarat state. BASF would foot roughly half of the overall investment bill, a spokesman added.

By using Yahoo, you agree that we and our partners can use cookies for purposes such as customising content and advertising. See our Privacy Policy to learn more