CAJ - Canon Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
19.66
+0.62 (+3.26%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close19.04
Open19.62
Bid0.00 x 1200
Ask21.00 x 800
Day's range19.54 - 19.89
52-week range18.69 - 29.49
Volume666,770
Avg. volume507,346
Market cap20.209B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.74
PE ratio (TTM)9.92
EPS (TTM)1.98
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield1.50 (7.85%)
Ex-dividend date27 Dec 2019
1y target est19.05
  • Canon's new R5 and R6 mirrorless cameras offer big video upgrades, bird eye autofocus and more
    TechCrunch

    Canon's new R5 and R6 mirrorless cameras offer big video upgrades, bird eye autofocus and more

    Canon has finally fully revealed its much-anticipated R5 and R6 mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras, and they look like very strong contenders for the field. The R5 is the new flagship of Canon's mirrorless line, and it's priced accordingly at $3,899 for the body alone. The R6 is its "affordable" sibling at $2,499 for the body alone, and still includes an impressive list of features, including some of the biggest autofocus system improvements common to the R5.

  • Google, Amazon Funnel Money to Virus Conspiracy Sites: Study
    Bloomberg

    Google, Amazon Funnel Money to Virus Conspiracy Sites: Study

    (Bloomberg) -- Digital advertising platforms run by Google, Amazon.com Inc. and other tech companies will funnel at least $25 million to websites spreading misinformation about Covid-19 this year, according to a study released Wednesday.Google’s platforms will provide $19 million, or $3 out of every $4 that the misinformation sites get in ad revenue. OpenX, a smaller digital ad distributor, handles about 10% of the money, while Amazon’s technology delivers roughly $1.7 million, or 7%, of the digital marketing spending these sites will receive, according to a research group called the Global Disinformation Index.GDI made the estimates in a study that analyzed ads running between January and June on 480 English language websites identified as publishers of virus misinformation. Some of the ads were for brands including cosmetics giant L’Oreal SA, furniture website Wayfair Inc. and imaging technology company Canon Inc. The data exclude social-media and online-video services, so the true total is likely much higher.“This report is flawed in that it neither defines what should be considered disinformation nor are its revenue calculations transparent or realistic,” a Google spokesperson said.The company doesn’t check whether websites are publishing truthful or accurate information before running ads. However, the internet giant reviewed 10 articles highlighted by the study where Google ads ran. It demonetized five of the web pages, meaning it removed the ability to make money from ads. “Google has strict publisher policies designed to prevent harmful, dangerous and fraudulent content from monetizing. We also continue to take an aggressive approach to COVID-19 content that makes harmful medical claims contradicting the guidance of global health authorities,” the spokesperson added. Amazon did not respond to requests for comment. Governments and health officials are still learning more about the virus, and this has allowed misinformation to flourish online. Silicon Valley giants have pledged to crack down, and Alphabet Inc.’s Google has removed ads from sites that violate its policies. However, GDI thinks these platforms need to do more to limit the spread of misinformation.“The difference between what the companies say publicly about their dedication to not monetizing hate speech and harmful content, especially around the pandemic, is not matching up with what our data is telling us that’s actually happening,” said Danny Rogers, co-founder of the Global Disinformation Index.In an ad delivered on May 19 by Amazon, a L’Oreal product was promoted on Americanthinker.com next to an article titled “Is Big Pharma Suppressing Hydroxychloroquine?” Earlier this month, Google served up a Bloomberg News ad on the website Bigleaguepolitics.com, according to the GDI report.The Global Disinformation Index is a U.K.-based research group that provides disinformation risk ratings on media sites all over the world. GDI said it presented Google, Amazon and OpenX with the latest findings from its report and none of the tech companies provided a formal response. The group updates its research weekly and often tells tech companies when their platforms place ads on misinformation sites.The research group releases this information, in part, as a way to alert advertisers when their marketing spots show up on this kind of website. These brands can help by pulling ads from tech platforms when they see issues like this, Rogers said.(Updates with no comment from Amazon in sixth paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • If 2020 Weren't Strange Enough, Printers Are Staging a Comeback
    Bloomberg

    If 2020 Weren't Strange Enough, Printers Are Staging a Comeback

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The Covid-19 pandemic is creating a deeper appreciation for things such as one’s health, getting together with friends, the great outdoors — and printers. Yes, home printers, those clunky deskside contraptions of a bygone era, are suddenly making a comeback, and it may outlast this crisis.As a recent Deloitte report put it, when the virus hit, hundreds of millions of people “brought their laptops home in a bag … but left their printers behind!” And oh, how we’ve missed them — not for the whir of the machine grabbing a sheet, nor the whoosh of the paper hitting its landing (though plenty of ASMR printer recordings do exist). Rather, it’s because we still print a lot more than we probably realized. One example: During regional Covid-19 lockdowns, consumers turned to online shopping, and that brought with it the inconvenience of needing to make returns and print shipping labels. That’s something office workers may have tended to do — shh! for I must whisper this part — at the office.Office printer mischief aside, there are plenty of jobs that entail regularly creating hard copies of reports or documents to sign, which is part of the reason some companies paid one-time allowances in the wake of Covid-19 to help employees configure their work-from-home setups. Deloitte predicts that sales of all-in-one home printers — the kind that scan and email — will surge 15% this year to nearly $29 billion. That’s double the annual growth rate that had been predicted before the coronavirus outbreak. Printers aren’t the only piece of 1990s nostalgia to see a resurgence lately. Social-media apps such as Instagram and TikTok show evidence of a revival of rollerblading, as cooped-up consumers look for safe activities to do outside. Food shortages, combined with the desire to make fewer trips to the grocery store, have led to a surge in sales of canned goods, home-baking ingredients and other pantry staples that had been waning in popularity during the last decade amid the rise of fresher foods and ready-to-eat items.But if any of these trends were to last as states and countries reopen and virus fears eventually subside, it’s probably printers. The lockdowns showed lots of companies that it’s more than possible to have large portions of their workforce working remotely. And there are signs that many will continue to embrace work-from-home policies, whether as a perk to retain and attract talent or to save on costs. Some offices that have already reopened are also running into post-Covid challenges, such as having open floor plans with side-by-side desks that may be more conducive to spreading the virus, and finding it difficult to get everyone up and down elevators safely without causing crowds in lobby areas.This sudden demand for home printers must be good news for manufacturers such as HP Inc., Canon Inc. and Xerox Holdings Corp., right? Not necessarily. These companies primarily make their money by selling business equipment, and from the recurring need for printer ink and other services; consumer hardware is generally less profitable. In fact, while printing normally accounts for just one-third of HP’s revenue, it drives more than half the company’s operating profit. However, HP’s managed print services experienced a 40% monthly decline in pages printed from February to April. Its commercial graphics solutions, such as its Indigo digital presses that can make brochures and catalogs, also suffered: “Indigo impressions went from being up 9% year-over-year in February to down 24% year-over-year in April,” CEO Enrique Lores said on HP’s earnings call in May.Still, Lores sees a silver lining for HP’s computer business. It used to be that one household sharing a single computer was enough, especially with tablets around. Now, he sees more homes having one PC per person. “What this crisis has shown is that if you want to be productive working from home, if you want your kids to be productive learning from home, you need to have access to a PC,” Lores said at an investor conference in May. “This is going to be changing the amount of PCs per household.” On the business side, while corporations are trying to cut back on printing to save money and the environment, HP and its rivals have their sights set on 3D printing as a way to stay relevant and keep growing. (SmileDirectClub Inc. makes its teeth aligners with HP’s 3D printing, which it used to make coronavirus face shields for hospitals, too.) HP is also pushing subscriptions to its Instant Ink delivery service, which counted more than 7 million customers last month, up from 6 million in February.And there you have it: The printer, the underappreciated office wallflower, has inked its place in the work-from-home future, for now. Just don’t count on that changing the fortunes of the companies that make them. This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tara Lachapelle is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the business of entertainment and telecommunications, as well as broader deals. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • New Strong Sell Stocks for June 29th
    Zacks

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    Here are 5 stocks added to the Zacks Rank 5 (Strong Sell) List today.

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  • Here's Why You Should Retain Genpact (G) in Your Portfolio
    Zacks

    Here's Why You Should Retain Genpact (G) in Your Portfolio

    Genpact (G) is currently benefiting from a strong customer base and accretive acquisitions.

  • New Strong Sell Stocks for January 13th
    Zacks

    New Strong Sell Stocks for January 13th

    Here are 5 stocks added to the Zacks Rank 5 (Strong Sell) List today

  • Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Canon, Advanced Energy Industries, Inphi and Skyworks Solutions highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day
    Zacks

    Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Canon, Advanced Energy Industries, Inphi and Skyworks Solutions highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

    Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Canon, Advanced Energy Industries, Inphi and Skyworks Solutions highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

  • Bear of the Day: Canon (CAJ)
    Zacks

    Bear of the Day: Canon (CAJ)

    Bear of the Day: Canon (CAJ)

  • New Strong Sell Stocks for November 15th
    Zacks

    New Strong Sell Stocks for November 15th

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  • Xerox (XRX) Hits Five-Year High on Possibility of HP Buyout
    Zacks

    Xerox (XRX) Hits Five-Year High on Possibility of HP Buyout

    Xerox (XRX) believes that the industry is long overdue for consolidation and early movers will have distinct advantage.

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