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Cocoa Sep 21 (CC=F)

NYBOT - NYBOT Delayed price. Currency in USD
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2,368.00-4.00 (-0.17%)
At close: 1:29PM EDT
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Pre. SettlementN/A
Settlement date2021-09-15
Open2,386.00
Bid2,368.00
Last price2,372.00
Day's range2,364.00 - 2,404.00
Volume14,351
Ask2,371.00
  • Supercharged Commodities May Rescue Ringgit Hit by Covid Surge
    Bloomberg

    Supercharged Commodities May Rescue Ringgit Hit by Covid Surge

    (Bloomberg) -- Malaysia’s worsening Covid outbreak is taking a toll on the ringgit but buoyant commodity prices may offer some support.Elevated crude and palm oil prices are likely to boost the nation’s export earnings and offer some reprieve to a currency that has trailed all its Asian peers this month, according to Australia & New Zealand Banking Group Ltd. The ringgit has slid about 1.3% versus the dollar in May as Malaysia overtook the global pandemic hotspot of India in confirmed infections per capita.The currency has come under siege on concerns that the curbs on movements aimed at tackling a fierce new wave of infections will hurt an economy showing nascent signs of a recovery. Still, the authorities may welcome a weaker ringgit as it would help make exports more competitive.“USD/MYR is near key resistance at 4.15, but any further weakness in the ringgit will be limited by favorable commodity prices for the country’s major exports,” said Khoon Goh, head of Asia research at ANZ in Singapore. “Oil and palm oil prices are still elevated despite the recent fall.”The ringgit was little changed at 4.1423 per dollar in late morning in Asia on Thursday. It slid to 4.1497 on Monday, the weakest level since April 1.Brent crude is trading at around $69 per barrel, near the year’s high of $71.38, while crude palm oil is at 4001 ringgit ($966) a ton after rallying as high as 4,525 ringgit this month.Palm oil, of which Malaysia is the world’s second-biggest producer, has risen more than 10% this quarter on supply concerns and a rally in competing vegetable oils.Still, restrictions on the plantations industry to rein in the surge in cases may act as a near-term drag. All workforce in agri-commodity sectors including palm oil, rubber, cocoa, and biodiesel will operate at 60% capacity, the government said Wednesday.(Adds restriction on plantations sector in final paragraph)More stories like this are available on bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

  • More than beans: Nestle recycles cocoa fruit waste to replace sugar in chocolate
    Reuters

    More than beans: Nestle recycles cocoa fruit waste to replace sugar in chocolate

    As confectionery groups scramble to reduce added sugar, chocolate sweetened with cocoa fruit pulp is about to hit supermarket shelves with food giant Nestle ready to launch its "Incoa" bar. Using cocoa fruit pulp, which is normally discarded, to flavour products reduces sugar and cuts food waste while boosting the income of cocoa farmers who can "upcycle" their cocoa by selling both the pulp and the beans. "This is a big launch, we give it to all the customers who want it and don't limit supplies," Alexander von Maillot, Nestle's global head of confectionery, told Reuters this week.

  • U.S. coffee roasters weigh price increases, cite shipping inflation
    Reuters

    U.S. coffee roasters weigh price increases, cite shipping inflation

    Coffee processors in the United States, the world's largest consumer of the beverage, are reporting significant cost increases in their operations, mostly related to transportation, and expect to raise retail prices soon. Mid-sized and smaller roasters, particularly specialty coffee companies, have been hit hardest, company executives said, but even larger companies such as Peet's and JM Smucker Co say they are coping with higher costs. Other U.S. business sectors also face shipping inflation.