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Casino, Guichard-Perrachon Société Anonyme (CGUIF)

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed price. Currency in USD
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28.500.00 (0.00%)
At close: 2:18PM EST
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Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
Previous close28.50
Open28.50
BidN/A x N/A
AskN/A x N/A
Day's range28.50 - 28.50
52-week range23.84 - 50.00
Volume100
Avg. volume136
Market cap3.001B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.53
PE ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend date09 May 2019
1y target estN/A
  • Meal Kits Are the Next Best Thing in Covid-19 Pandemic
    Bloomberg

    Meal Kits Are the Next Best Thing in Covid-19 Pandemic

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- A whole generation of tech startups was built on the premise that the most lucrative business models aim to connect people or businesses on one side of the marketplace with people or businesses on the other side.Whether Tinder, Uber Technologies Inc. or Airbnb Inc., the platform theory held that acting as a facilitator for someone else’s offering meant you could scrape off commission while maintaining an asset-light business whose low operational costs rewarded you with high profitability. But no one foresaw an event that would shut down a whole side of the marketplace, and the coronavirus pandemic has done just that. For Airbnb, self-isolation means that nobody is travelling. There is plenty of supply with millions of listings still on the site, but the demand has all but evaporated. The same goes for Uber rides.In food delivery, it’s the supply side that has difficulties. On the whole, services like Uber Eats, Grubhub Inc., Deliveroo and Just Eat Takeaway depend on existing restaurants to cook meals. But for many, if not most, of those restaurants, the main business was still preparing food for on-site dining. Now that’s not possible in the U.K., France, Italy and elsewhere, continuing to operate as a delivery-only operation fundamentally changes the economics of the business: Restaurants still have operating costs, except now they might have to direct a quarter of their income to the food delivery platforms. Many have simply shut their doors completely because they can’t make it work. Chinese delivery platform Meituan Dianping is already feeling the impact, as my colleague Tim Culpan wrote yesterday. (Uber Eats and Grubhub are trying to counter the trend by subsidizing some restaurant costs.)Which is why companies like HelloFresh SE and Blue Apron Holdings Inc., long the subject of Silicon Valley derision, suddenly seem to have very sensible business models. On the surface, they are similar to the food delivery platforms: They too deliver food.The difference is that, because they deliver meal kits they put together in their own kitchens, they control the supply, whereas a firm like Deliveroo has to worry about ensuring it has enough restaurants and customers. HelloFresh’s concern is simply demand. Even then, there’s less need for as high a density of demand than for takeaway food — though of course it helps. Because customers cook the meals themselves, there’s less anxiety about a dish congealing in the panniers of a moped. While Deliveroo has started operating some of its own kitchens, it still has to compete with Grubhub, Just Eat Takeaway and Uber Eats on two fronts. HelloFresh can concentrate on one: customers.The upshot is that business is soaring for the meal-kit firms. HelloFresh said Monday it’s expecting first-quarter sales of between 685 million euros ($750 million) and 710 million euros, up from 420 million euros a year earlier. Analysts had been expecting revenue of 553 million euros. The company anticipates adjusted first-quarter Ebitda of as much as 75 million euros — in just three months, it's set to make about three quarters of the profit that analysts had anticipated for the full year. Uber, which isn't expected to be profitable at all on a similar basis until 2022, has seen just a 10% jump in U.S. orders at its food delivery business, according to The Information.HelloFresh stock is up 70% this year, valuing the Berlin-based firm at 5.2 billion euros — more than Grubhub or grocers Casino Guichard Perrachon SA and Wm Morrison Supermarkets Plc. Beleaguered Blue Apron’s shares have jumped more than fourfold from a March 13 low, giving it a $156 million market capitalization, though its ability to capitalize on surging demand is more limited — it has been cutting costs in recent months. Meanwhile HelloFresh is expanding: It plans to add 400 employees at a site in Oxfordshire, near London, according to the BBC.Silicon Valley dogma tends to dictate that assets are bad. But in some instances, more control over the factors of supply can be very satisfying indeed.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Alex Webb is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Europe's technology, media and communications industries. He previously covered Apple and other technology companies for Bloomberg News in San Francisco.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • For Once, Monoprix’s Owner Has Something Right
    Bloomberg

    For Once, Monoprix’s Owner Has Something Right

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- As lockdowns shutter stores and keep consumers cooped up at home, there will be many losers from the outbreak of the Covid-19 virus. But there will also be a few winners.Casino Guichard Perrachon SA, the French supermarket operator that’s been a target for short-selling hedge funds, is emerging as a beneficiary, in line with other grocers seeing a frantic stockpiling of food on both sides of the Atlantic.While Casino’s complex financial structure has long been a source of consternation, there are some jewels in its highly leveraged crown. These are the Monoprix and Franprix chains, both of which have strongholds in Paris.Between its brands, Casino has more than 40% of the Paris market, compared with 11.5% nationally, according to Charles Allen, an analyst at Bloomberg Intelligence. Much of French capital is served by small supermarkets, such as Franprix, which average around 5,300 square feet. This format has been particularly strong over recent weeks, as Parisians, like city dwellers worldwide, don’t want to venture too far from their homes to stock up on groceries. And while Monoprix’s clothing range will be under pressure, demand for food has rocketed.Casino should be able to capitalize on a boom in home delivery too. The company sells through Amazon and it just began testing an online grocery service with Ocado Group Plc. Its online non-food business Cdiscount is also expanding its grocery offer, and may benefit from increased demand for all kinds of electronics as people are forced to work from home.But as ever with the company controlled by Jean-Charles Naouri, things aren’t straightforward. Despite the upswing, Casino on Thursday gave no guidance and suspended its three-year targets, saying the coronavirus pandemic makes predictions impossible. Although free cash flow before disposals improved, the company’s ability to deliver cash in France has been disappointing over the past couple of years. While frantic shoppers in today’s environment should give Casino a boost, its weak cash generation and high leverage shouldn’t be overlooked. Moves to sell and lease back stores over the past two years add rental payments to its financial obligations.Net debt in France fell from 2.7 billion euros to 2.3 billion euros in 2019, helped by the asset sales. But overall borrowings rose from 3.4 billion euros to 4.1 billion euros, after Casino used debt to finance the simplification of its structure in Latin America.What’s more, Casino has decided to hit pause on its disposal program as it grapples with “unprecedented demand,” both in its stores and online. Still on the list to be offloaded is the Geant hypermarket business.The company is in the midst of a 4.5 billion-euro divestment program, having struck 2.8 billion euros of deals so far. Of this, about 1 billion euros worth have been signed, but not yet completed. When these transactions cross the finish line, Casino should be able to repay bonds due in 2021 and 2022. Still, Casino must agree another 1.7 billion of disposals to reach its targets. It’s confident it will still achieve them in time and it’s done a good job so far, with a better-than-expected price just this month  from selling its Leader Price chain to German discount rival Aldi for example. But conditions could be rockier from here given the economic fallout from the coronavirus.The disposal program is important for both Casino and its parent Rallye, Naouri’s investment group. The proceeds are key for Casino to be able to  resume paying dividends, and Rallye, which owns 52% of Casino, is counting on them. The debt-laden Rallye agreed a restructuring plan with the French courts last month that gives it 10 years to pay back 2.9 billion euros.Although the shares initially fell as much as 7.75% on Thursday, they ended up 1.7%, cementing their outperformance over the past month. So investors seem convinced it will continue to benefit from the current crisis. But as long-time followers of  Casino know, even when the chips are looking up, there are always more spins to come.(Corrects Thursday’s share price move in final paragraph.)This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Leclerc boss: enough food in French stores despite coronavirus disruption

    The head of French supermarket company Leclerc said on Wednesday the coronavirus crisis was disrupting the supplies of some basic staples in its stores but that there were no shortages to fear. Lecler said there was disruption to supplies of basic staples such as pasta, rice, or toilet paper in some stores as consumers were stocking up in areas most affected by the virus, such as eastern France or the Oise region, north of Paris.