CHTEX.AS: Summary for CHEVRON - Yahoo Finance

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CHEVRON (CHTEX.AS)


Amsterdam - Amsterdam Delayed price. Currency in USD
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115.810.00 (0.00%)
As of 4:29PM CET. Market open.
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Interactive chart
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1d
Previous close115.81
Open115.81
Bid0.05 x 750000
Ask89.00 x 6000
Day's range115.81 - 115.81
52-week range115.81 - 115.81
Volume50
Avg. volume0
Market capN/A
BetaN/A
PE ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings dateN/A
Dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target estN/A
  • Reuters - UK Focus3 years ago

    Angola to hold tender for 12 new offshore oil blocks in 2015

    Angolan state oil company Sonangol plans to launch a tender for licences to explore 12 new offshore oil blocks in 2015, state news agency Angop cited Oil Minister Jose Botelho de Vasconcelos as saying ...

  • Reuters - UK Focus3 years ago

    Mexico's rural landowners pose threat to foreign energy investors

    EMILIANO ZAPATA, Mexico, June 18 (Reuters) - When foreign investors begin to pour into Mexico's overhauled energy sector in the coming months, they will face a potent force well-known to miners: Mexico's ejidos, or rural landowner groups. The product of revolutionary land reform - almost a century ago - that redistributed more than 100 million hectares from large landowners to small farming groups, the ejidos control surface rights to large swaths of Mexico. The ejidos are often poor but they can be powerful: machete-wielding landowners shuttered government plans for a new Mexico City airport in 2002. For years, foreign companies have owned concessions to mine metals in Mexico, leading them into delicate negotiations with the ejidos, who often block mines for months when they feel they are getting a raw deal.

  • Reuters - UK Focus3 years ago

    Mexico's rural landowners pose threat to foreign energy investors

    EMILIANO ZAPATA, Mexico, June 18 (Reuters) - When foreign investors begin to pour into Mexico's overhauled energy sector in the coming months, they will face a potent force well-known to miners: Mexico's ejidos, or rural landowner groups. The product of revolutionary land reform - almost a century ago - that redistributed more than 100 million hectares from large landowners to small farming groups, the ejidos control surface rights to large swaths of Mexico. The ejidos are often poor but they can be powerful: machete-wielding landowners shuttered government plans for a new Mexico City airport in 2002. For years, foreign companies have owned concessions to mine metals in Mexico, leading them into delicate negotiations with the ejidos, who often block mines for months when they feel they are getting a raw deal.