COB.L - Cobham plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
164.50
0.00 (0.00%)
At close: 4:35PM GMT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close164.55
Open164.60
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's range164.50 - 164.60
52-week range97.92 - 171.20
Volume30,759,072
Avg. volume20,034,296
Market cap3.964B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.21
PE ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-1.90
Earnings date05 Mar 2020
Forward dividend & yield0.00 (0.24%)
Ex-dividend date10 Oct 2019
1y target est124.20
  • Cobham buyer vows to keep UK jobs and HQs after controversial takeover
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Cobham buyer vows to keep UK jobs and HQs after controversial takeover

    The new owners made a series of pledges that helped win over the UK government, but a relative of its founder hit out at the takeover.

  • Britain gives U.S. investor go-ahead to buy Cobham for $5 billion
    Reuters

    Britain gives U.S. investor go-ahead to buy Cobham for $5 billion

    Britain has approved the purchase of British defence company Cobham by U.S. investor Advent International for $5 billion after the private equity group made commitments to address national security concerns. Business minister Andrea Leadsom had put the deal on hold to review the sale of air-to-air refuelling equipment maker Cobham, which employs 10,000 people and also makes communications equipment for military vehicles. "I am satisfied that the undertakings mitigate the national security risks identified to an acceptable level and have therefore accepted them and cleared the merger to proceed," Leadsom said in a statement http://bit.ly/2PIzbkS published on Friday.

  • Dealmakers Will Test Johnson’s Open-Market Cred
    Bloomberg

    Dealmakers Will Test Johnson’s Open-Market Cred

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The U.K.’s election of a right-wing, pro-market government with a thumping majority would certainly seem like a green light to foreign companies wanting to buy London-listed rivals. But the new political climate for takeovers may be hazier than it seems.Boris Johnson’s administration is still only four months old, so it’s hard to know precisely how it would approach a sizable, serious, fully funded foreign takeover bid. The old chestnuts that surface now and again include an attempt on the big drugmakers, AstraZeneca Plc or GlaxoSmithKline Plc, a tilt by Exxon Mobil Corp. for BP Plc, or even a U.S. bid for BAE Systems Plc, despite the government having a veto via a “golden share.”A proposal to take over these particular British icons would be controversial, and each has its strategic and financial obstacles (AstraZeneca is expensive; oil companies are trying to get away from oil, not buy more). Yet getting the political calculation right may prove even trickier.Although Johnson hasn’t made the same protectionist noises as his predecessor, Theresa May, the U.K. has been taking a more interventionist stance on M&A lately. It’s now the norm for bidders in sensitive sectors to accept restrictions on how they’ll manage the assets they acquire, as seen most recently with the private-equity-led deals for defense contractor Cobham Plc and satellite operator Inmarsat Plc. The Competition and Markets Authority, the U.K.’s trustbuster, is getting tougher too. Witness its examination of Amazon.com Inc.’s minority stake in food-delivery group Deliveroo, even though the e-commerce giant would not have control.The question is whether the current level of scrutiny is where it peaks.Johnson is in a bind. The extra seats that delivered his majority were secured by votes potentially “lent,” to use the premier’s own phrase, from supporters of the opposition Labour Party, including those in Britain’s industrial heartlands. Johnson won’t want to alienate these voters by hastily endorsing deals that could threaten U.K. jobs or deliver prized national assets to foreign owners. Despite the Conservative Party’s longstanding laissez-faire approach to markets, the nationalist undercurrent remains strong in British politics.On the other hand, if the bearish analyses of Brexit's impact prove true, the U.K. economy is in for a difficult time in the years ahead. Johnson will want to attract foreign investment, and flat resistance to any overseas bid would surely be a deterrent to the international business audience. Potential U.S. bidders may judge that Johnson will also want to keep President Donald Trump happy if he is to secure the wide-ranging free-trade deal he campaigned on.Johnson, then, will be torn between his new Labour supporters and global business. Predicting where he’ll side isn’t easy. But when push comes to shove, and with the next election years away, it seems likely that he’d follow the money. Logic suggests that deal-hungry CEOs will now feel more confident testing Britain’s open-market credentials.To contact the author of this story: Chris Hughes at chughes89@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Timothy Lavin at tlavin1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Hughes is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals. He previously worked for Reuters Breakingviews, as well as the Financial Times and the Independent newspaper.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    Britain indicates it is likely to allow Advent's $5 billion Cobham purchase

    The British Government has indicated it is likely to allow Advent's $5 billion purchase of defence company Cobham after the U.S. private equity group offered a number of commitments to address national security concerns. Britain's Business minister Andrea Leadsom had put the deal on hold while she established whether the sale of the air-to-air refuelling equipment maker posed a national security threat. Shares in Cobham were 3.9% higher at 160.8 pence by 0946 GMT.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 3-Britain indicates it is likely to allow Advent's $5 billion Cobham purchase

    The British Government has indicated it is likely to allow Advent's $5 billion purchase of defence company Cobham after the U.S. private equity group offered a number of commitments to address national security concerns. Britain's Business minister Andrea Leadsom had put the deal on hold while she established whether the sale of the air-to-air refuelling equipment maker posed a national security threat. "We have worked closely with the Ministry of Defence to construct undertakings that would adequately mitigate against any potential national security risks," Shonnel Malani, partner at Advent, said.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Advent wins EU approval for Cobham deal, still waiting for UK nod

    U.S. private equity firm Advent International said it had won approval from European Union, U.S. and Finnish regulators for its $5 billion acquisition of British defence company Cobham, as it continues to wait for U.K. approval. Britain has intervened in the deal on national security grounds and its regulator, the Competition and Markets Authority, is due to give the results of its investigation on the matter to the business minister on Tuesday. Advent said in a statement that it continued to work to win government approval.

By using Yahoo, you agree that we and our partners can use cookies for purposes such as customising content and advertising. See our Privacy Policy to learn more