DHR - Danaher Corporation

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
151.30
+1.63 (+1.09%)
At close: 4:03PM EST
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close149.67
Open149.35
Bid0.00 x 900
Ask0.00 x 800
Day's range149.07 - 153.02
52-week range94.59 - 153.02
Volume68,170,459
Avg. volume5,774,259
Market cap109B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.83
PE ratio (TTM)44.88
EPS (TTM)3.37
Earnings date27 Jan 2020 - 31 Jan 2020
Forward dividend & yield0.68 (0.45%)
Ex-dividend date2019-12-26
1y target est153.21
  • Danaher to Lower Stake in Envista, Finalizes Exchange Ratio
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    Danaher to Lower Stake in Envista, Finalizes Exchange Ratio

    Danaher (DHR) sets the exchange ratio for each share of Danaher common stock at 5.5784 shares of Envista common stock.

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  • Was Danaher Corporation's (NYSE:DHR) Earnings Decline Part Of A Broader Industry Downturn?
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    Was Danaher Corporation's (NYSE:DHR) Earnings Decline Part Of A Broader Industry Downturn?

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  • GE's New CFO Lacks 'Wow' Factor and That's Fine
    Bloomberg

    GE's New CFO Lacks 'Wow' Factor and That's Fine

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- General Electric Co.’s choice for its next chief financial officer lacks a “wow” factor but checks the right boxes.  The industrial giant announced on Monday that it had hired Carolina Dybeck Happe – currently the CFO at Copenhagen-based shipping company A.P. Moller-Maersk A/S – to help CEO Larry Culp carry out a turnaround that’s finally starting to yield some results. Jamie Miller announced her intention to step down as GE’s CFO in July, and the company’s been looking for a replacement ever since. Miller will officially hand over the reins to Dybeck Happe in early 2020.Dybeck Happe previously spent more than 15 years at Stockholm-based lock maker Assa Abloy AB, but she has little name recognition in the U.S. Certainly, this isn’t the kind of blockbuster hire that some investors had been hoping to see. Many had their eye on Daniel Comas, Culp’s previous right-hand man at Danaher Corp.  A hire like that would have gotten more reaction out of the stock. Instead, shares of GE traded up about 1% Monday amid a broader rally. Still, amid ongoing investigations by the Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission into GE’s accounting practices, the value of simply announcing a hire and putting this matter to bed shouldn’t be discounted. And frankly, there is enough of a cult of personality already baked in to the current price. Most investors would tell you the stock could easily be 50% lower if it weren’t for Culp and the reputation for operational excellency he earned in his Danaher years.Culp has managed to so far avoid fresh nasty surprises in the long-term care insurance business and elsewhere at GE Capital, while the troubled power business no longer appears to be in free fall. There’s still a long way to go in this turnaround story, though. Remaining headaches for GE include a competitive market for what little demand remains for gas turbines in a world increasingly turning to renewable energy; the impact from divestitures; a fierce debate about the sustainability of its aviation unit’s free cash flow; and a continuing need to restructure, particularly in Europe where cost-cutting discussions can be notoriously difficult. Culp needs someone to help him execute on further operational changes, of course. He also could use the perspective of another outsider to continue to root out the cultural problems that led the company into this mess. Miller did a stint at insurance company WellPoint Inc., but she’s been with GE since 2008 and was likely too much of an insider to execute the kind of overhaul the company really needs. This includes finally breaking with its tendency to over-engineer its financial statements and prioritize optics over reality.There’s no reason why Dybeck Happe can’t be that person. Shares in Assa Abloy returned more than 150% to investors over the course of Dybeck Happe’s tenure as CFO there amid a spike in earnings, fueled in part by prudent cost control and in part by a steady stream of M&A. She’s only been at Moller-Maersk since January, but also sits on the board of Schneider Electric SE. Dybeck Happe’s European background could prove particularly helpful to GE on the cost-cutting dilemmas tied to its ill-fated acquisition of Alstom SA’s energy arm. And it’s nice to see a female executive replaced by another female executive for a change. Dybeck Happe was the first female CFO in Moller-Maersk’s 115-year history and was appointed there after at least one investor asked for more diversity, so her departure will be felt at the male-heavy company. Moller-Maersk’s loss may just be GE’s gain.To contact the author of this story: Brooke Sutherland at bsutherland7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brooke Sutherland is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and industrial companies. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Acquired Assets Aid Danaher (DHR) Despite Rise in Costs
    Zacks

    Acquired Assets Aid Danaher (DHR) Despite Rise in Costs

    Danaher's (DHR) acquisitive nature has been driving its top line. High product demand and shareholder-friendly policies are added positives. However, high costs, forex woes and debts are concerning.

  • Simple Market Timing Strategies That Work - November 19, 2019
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    Simple Market Timing Strategies That Work - November 19, 2019

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  • Danaher (DHR) Catches Eye: Stock Jumps 5%
    Zacks

    Danaher (DHR) Catches Eye: Stock Jumps 5%

    Danaher (DHR) saw a big move last session, as its shares jumped more than 5% on the day, amid huge volumes.

  • ITT vs. DHR: Which Stock Should Value Investors Buy Now?
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    ITT vs. DHR: Which Stock Should Value Investors Buy Now?

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  • Have Insiders Been Selling Danaher Corporation (NYSE:DHR) Shares?
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    Have Insiders Been Selling Danaher Corporation (NYSE:DHR) Shares?

    We've lost count of how many times insiders have accumulated shares in a company that goes on to improve markedly...

  • Top Analyst Reports for Mastercard, UnitedHealth & Merck
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    Top Analyst Reports for Mastercard, UnitedHealth & Merck

    Top Analyst Reports for Mastercard, UnitedHealth & Merck

  • GE has lost its ability to be a 'benchmark': analyst
    Yahoo Finance

    GE has lost its ability to be a 'benchmark': analyst

    Investors pushed shares of GE up nearly 12% after better than expected third quarter results, but at least one analyst thinks that rally was unjustified.

  • Don’t Look Now, But GE Is Getting Somewhere
    Bloomberg

    Don’t Look Now, But GE Is Getting Somewhere

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- General Electric Co.’s path to recovery is a long one, but the company no longer seems lost in the woods.  In releasing its third-quarter results on Wednesday, GE also raised its guidance for 2019 free cash flow and now anticipates its industrial businesses could bring in as much as $2 billion this year. That’s a $4 billion swing from GE’s worst-case scenario in its initial March forecast. There’s a fine line between setting a low bar and sandbagging the numbers, but GE’s rosier outlook is supported by signs of stabilization in its beleaguered power unit and there being less of a drag than anticipated from the transition of a supply-chain financing program to a third party. The aviation business was also able to largely offset the negative impact of the continued grounding of Boeing Co.’s 737 Max. Those were key worry points that ended up not being as worrisome.It wasn’t a perfect quarter and there are some notable footnotes to that guidance increase. Still, a lack of nasty surprises and minimal signs to date of macroeconomic weakness in GE’s aviation and health-care businesses make this a victory for CEO Larry Culp. A flurry of deleveraging activities in the last two months had raised concerns that GE was trying to give itself some good news to talk about if the actual quarterly numbers were disappointments, particularly amid growing concerns that a manufacturing slowdown was deepening. That fear appears unfounded, at least as far as the last three months are concerned for GE’s businesses.Shares of GE rallied as much as 14% on the report, essentially erasing a slide since its last earnings update in July that in part reflected concerns over the impact of slumping interest rates. The decline in rates forced GE to reassess its expectations for the returns it will get on assets supporting the company’s long-term-care insurance business. While this contributed to a $1 billion pre-tax charge in the latest quarter as the company bolstered its GAAP reserves, it’s better than the “ somewhere south” of $1.5 billion adjustment – before other offsets – that Culp had flagged in September. And it’s certainly nowhere in the ballpark of what’s implied in the $29 billion reserve shortfall Bernie Madoff whistle-blower Harry Markopolos claimed existed.Operating profit for the power segment turned negative again after a few quarters of positive numbers. But margins did improve in that business – to negative 3.7% from negative 14.8% a year earlier – which GE says reflects better pricing discipline. The company now expects the cash burn at the power unit to be no worse than the $2.3 billion outflow last year (adjusted for a reorganization of that business), versus an initial prediction of a substantial year-over-year weakening. The health-care division saw a nice lift in profit margins and a 5% jump in sales, even as its imaging business struggled in China and some larger U.S> projects got pushed out. And aviation rebounded from an uncharacteristically weak second quarter. These are all positive data points that speak to Culp’s push for operational improvements.What hasn’t changed is that even at $2 billion, GE’s free cash flow will be very weak this year. The current forecast compares to $4.5 billion last year and $5.6 billion in 2017. While a stronger starting point in 2019 certainly helps, GE will have to overcome a number of challenges to get back to even those depressed levels. Already, GE will lose about $1 billion in free cash flow in 2020 from the sale of its biopharmaceutical business to Danaher Corp., per analysts’ estimates. Despite an improved performance in 2019, there’s no update at this time for GE’s expectation for the power unit to continue burning cash next year. And GE has to keep spending on restructuring. It again lowered its estimate for the cost of these cutbacks this year (which was a boon to its free-cash-flow outlook) in part because of the “timing” of politically fraught conversations in Europe over facilities and employees absorbed as part of its disastrous acquisition of Alstom SA’s power business. Keeping economic headwinds at bay will also be key.  Meanwhile, GE will get lower contributions from Baker Hughes as it continues to wind down its stake; a divestiture in September pushed that holding below 50%, forcing the company to take an $8.7 billion pre-tax charge in the quarter.Culp is doing what he needs to do to stop the bleeding at GE. Now the conversation shifts to what kind of company this is going to look like when he’s done and how far this turnaround can go.    To contact the author of this story: Brooke Sutherland at bsutherland7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brooke Sutherland is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and industrial companies. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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    General Electric (GE) Tops Q3 Earnings Estimates, Ups FCF View

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  • Is Danaher Corporation's (NYSE:DHR) ROE Of 7.7% Concerning?
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    Is Danaher Corporation's (NYSE:DHR) ROE Of 7.7% Concerning?

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  • Danaher (DHR) Beats Q3 Earnings Estimates, Lowers '19 View
    Zacks

    Danaher (DHR) Beats Q3 Earnings Estimates, Lowers '19 View

    Danaher's (DHR) third-quarter 2019 earnings benefit from organic sales growth, acquisitions and DBS initiatives. It lowers 2019 projection, accounting for the Envista transaction.

  • Danaher (DHR) Q3 Earnings Surpass Estimates
    Zacks

    Danaher (DHR) Q3 Earnings Surpass Estimates

    Danaher (DHR) delivered earnings and revenue surprises of 0.87% and -0.06%, respectively, for the quarter ended September 2019. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?

  • Danaher Earnings, Revenue Beat in Q3
    Investing.com

    Danaher Earnings, Revenue Beat in Q3

    Investing.com - Danaher (NYSE:DHR) reported third quarter earnings that beat analysts' expectations on Thursday and revenue that topped forecasts.

  • Should You Buy Danaher (DHR) Ahead of Earnings?
    Zacks

    Should You Buy Danaher (DHR) Ahead of Earnings?

    Danaher (DHR) is seeing favorable earnings estimate revision activity and has a positive Zacks Earnings ESP heading into earnings season.

  • Can Danaher (DHR) Keep Earnings Beat Streak Alive in Q3?
    Zacks

    Can Danaher (DHR) Keep Earnings Beat Streak Alive in Q3?

    Danaher's (DHR) third-quarter earnings are expected to reflect the impact of Danaher Business System, acquired assets, solid product offerings and innovation. Forex and cost woes remain.

  • Danaher (DHR) Reports Next Week: Wall Street Expects Earnings Growth
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    Danaher (DHR) Reports Next Week: Wall Street Expects Earnings Growth

    Danaher (DHR) possesses the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely earnings beat in its upcoming report. Get prepared with the key expectations.

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  • Danaher (DHR) Earnings Expected to Grow: What to Know Ahead of Q3 Release
    Zacks

    Danaher (DHR) Earnings Expected to Grow: What to Know Ahead of Q3 Release

    Danaher (DHR) possesses the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely earnings beat in its upcoming report. Get prepared with the key expectations.

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