DLTR - Dollar Tree, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real-time price. Currency in USD
95.16
-2.05 (-2.11%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close97.21
Open96.92
Bid93.01 x 1800
Ask96.80 x 1800
Day's range94.83 - 98.09
52-week range78.78 - 113.38
Volume2,533,329
Avg. volume2,112,629
Market cap22.608B
Beta (3Y monthly)0.66
PE ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-6.23
Earnings date29 Aug 2019
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target est111.81
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Wall Street Weekahead: Investors look at dollar stores as U.S. recession fears increase
    Reuters

    Wall Street Weekahead: Investors look at dollar stores as U.S. recession fears increase

    More investors are watching the shares of discount retailers like Dollar General Corp and Dollar Tree Inc , which perform better during economic downturns, in the hopes of gauging changes in consumer behavior, though higher tariffs may erode the companies' ability to act as economic bellwethers. Fund managers and analysts say that they are looking for signs of a so-called "trade-down trade", in which consumers forgo shopping at higher-end department stores or supermarkets in favor of the more limited selection but lower prices at deep discounters. Between December 2008 and December 2011, for instance, shares of Dollar Tree soared nearly 200% as consumers pinched pennies during the Great Recession, while the benchmark S&P 500 gained just 39% over the same time.

  • Dollar Tree (DLTR) Expected to Beat Earnings Estimates: Should You Buy?
    Zacks

    Dollar Tree (DLTR) Expected to Beat Earnings Estimates: Should You Buy?

    Dollar Tree (DLTR) possesses the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely earnings beat in its upcoming report. Get prepared with the key expectations.

  • Costco (COST) Stellar Comps Aiding Stock's Run on Bourses
    Zacks

    Costco (COST) Stellar Comps Aiding Stock's Run on Bourses

    Costco (COST) looks quite disciplined in its approach of tackling prevailing headwinds in the retail landscape. Stellar comps trend is shaping stock's bullish run on the bourses.

  • Can Dollar Tree (DLTR) Q2 Earnings Beat Despite Soft Margins?
    Zacks

    Can Dollar Tree (DLTR) Q2 Earnings Beat Despite Soft Margins?

    Dollar Tree (DLTR) is likely to witness continued softness in second-quarter fiscal 2019, owing to soft margins stemming from higher costs. This also leads to soft outlook for fiscal 2019.

  • Business Wire

    Dollar Tree, Inc. to Host Second Quarter Earnings Conference Call

    Dollar Tree, Inc. , North America's leading operator of discount variety stores, will host its conference call for investors and analysts to discuss financial results for the second quarter ended August 3, 2019.

  • China Sticking to September U.S. Trade Talks After Tariff Delay
    Bloomberg

    China Sticking to September U.S. Trade Talks After Tariff Delay

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Chinese officials are sticking to their plan to visit Washington in September for face-to-face trade meetings, people familiar with the matter said, signaling that talks remain on track for now despite an abrupt escalation in tariff threats this month.The U.S. on Tuesday delayed the imposition of some new tariffs after top negotiators spoke on the phone, with President Donald Trump saying the encounter was “very productive,” and that he thinks Beijing wants to “do something dramatic” to end the impasse.That said, Chinese negotiators are not very optimistic of any imminent progress, one of the people said. Officials are unlikely to make concessions in the run up to October 1, the celebration of the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic, the person said.S&P 500 futures erased their losses, the yen pared gains and the yuan rose slightly on the news. The Ministry of Commerce did not immediately respond to a request for comment.Tensions between the world’s two biggest economies rose significantly this month after Trump said he would tariff another $300 billion of Chinese goods, prompting Beijing to halt U.S. agricultural purchases and allow the yuan to weaken. The escalation brought into question whether talks planned for September would still go ahead, with Trump saying it’s "fine" if they don’t.Though Trump has often denied his tariffs have any impact on consumer prices and insists their cost is being borne by China, he also said the delay had been made “so it won’t be relevant to the Christmas shopping season.”Prospects for genuine progress in trade talks are low, especially as Chinese President Xi Jinping tackles weeks-long protests in Hong Kong that his government blames the U.S. for instigating.Whether or not the talks actually take place also depends on developments between now and then, according to one of the people. The next call between the negotiating teams will be in two weeks.Trump’s move to delay some tariffs involved the splitting of an almost $300 billion list of products from China into two separate ones. Lots of agricultural products, antiques, clothes, kitchenware and footwear remained on the list to be hit Sept. 1 -- with a total value of more than $110 billion, according to a Bloomberg News analysis of last year’s import figures.But big-ticket categories such as smart-phones, laptops, and children’s toys -- worth about $160 billion -- would only be subject to tariffs after Dec. 15, according to Tuesday’s announcement. Nearly $2 billion worth of products were removed from the combined lists including bibles and shipping containers.U.S. stocks surged on the news Tuesday. Apple Inc. spiked as much as 5.8% and Best Buy Co. climbed as much as 11% on optimism that the reprieve would boost electronics sales in the holiday season. Apparel retailers including Gap Inc. and L Brands Inc. rose, as did toymaker Hasbro Inc. and discount chain Dollar Tree Inc.The development was greeted in Beijing with some skepticism. Taoran Notes, a blog run by the state-run Economic Daily, wrote on Wednesday that the negotiators’ call was made on the invitation of the U.S., indicating that Trump is feeling the pressure of the tariffs.The call sends a “positive" signal, as it showed that the two sides are still in communication, and are willing to keep in touch, it said. But whether there will be progress or not depends on the U.S.’s actions, according to the blog."The outside world should have no illusion on China’s positions,” the blog said. "If the U.S. sticks to the maximum pressure tactic, then its goal won’t be reached even if additional tariffs are imposed on all Chinese goods.”To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Steven Yang in Beijing at kyang74@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jeffrey Black at jblack25@bloomberg.net, ;John Liu at jliu42@bloomberg.net, Sharon ChenFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Trump Bows to Economic Fears in Move to Delay China Tariffs
    Bloomberg

    Trump Bows to Economic Fears in Move to Delay China Tariffs

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. President Donald Trump bowed to pressure from U.S. businesses and concerns over the economic fallout of his trade war with China, delaying the imposition of new tariffs on a wide variety of consumer products including toys and laptops until December.Tuesday’s move to at least hit the pause button in his fight with China came as senior officials on both sides had their first phone conversation since Trump threatened the tariffs at the beginning of this month. It also cheered markets that had been growing increasingly concerned over the impact of trade tensions on a slowing global economy. U.S. stocks halted a two-day slide, and Asian equities climbed.Trump said the latest conversation with China had been “productive” and that “they would really like to make a deal.” Though he has often denied his tariffs have any impact on consumer prices and insists their cost is being borne by China, he also said the delay had been made “so it won’t be relevant to the Christmas shopping season.”The move announced Tuesday involved the splitting of an almost $300 billion list of products from China into two separate ones. Lots of agricultural products, antiques, clothes, kitchenware and footwear remained on the list to be hit Sept. 1 -- with a total value of more than $110 billion, according to a Bloomberg News analysis of last year’s import figures. But big-ticket categories such as smart-phones, laptops, and children’s toys -- worth about $160 billion -- would only be subject to tariffs after Dec. 15, according to Tuesday’s announcement. Nearly $2 billion worth of products were removed from the combined lists including bibles and shipping containers.The delay “is an incrementally positive sign,” Goldman Sachs Group Inc. chief economist Jan Hatzius wrote in an note. “It suggests that the disruption in financial markets over the last several days could have led to a softening of the White House position.”China’s commerce and foreign ministries didn’t immediately respond to faxes seeking comment. While markets applauded the splitting of the new tariffs, some businesses expressed frustration with the sudden turnaround and the fact that they were once again being left to make important business decisions on the fly because of the president’s trade policies.“It’s too late and it’s not enough,” said Peter Bragdon, chief administrative officer for the Columbia Sportswear Co. “There’s continued chaotic policy making and incoherence coming out of Washington that makes it very hard for businesses in the United States to plan.”Columbia still has products including footwear such as waterproof hiking boots that would be hit with a 10% tariff come next month. While only 10%-15% of Columbia’s products were made in China, production of specialized footwear was difficult to move, Bragdon said, and the company had already warned customers it would be forced to raise some of its prices.In some cases the splitting of the tariffs will make life more complicated for retailers and other businesses. Some categories of golf shoes, for example, will be subject to a 10% tariff Sept. 1 while others will not be targeted until Dec. 15. Apple Inc.’s iPhones will not face new import taxes until mid-December. But the popular wireless Airpods that go with them will be taxed in September.Stocks surged on the news Tuesday. Apple Inc. spiked as much as 5.8% and Best Buy Co. climbed as much as 11% on optimism that the reprieve would boost electronics sales in the holiday season. Apparel retailers including Gap Inc. and L Brands Inc. rose, as did toymaker Hasbro Inc. and discount chain Dollar Tree Inc.“What this means is that retailers will be able to get their shipments in without the 10% tariff, which is a sigh of relief,” said Poonam Goyal, a retail analyst at Bloomberg Intelligence. “It definitely saves the holiday season.”With the Sept. 1 deadline, there wasn’t time for retailers to speed up ordering for the holiday season because it often takes more than four weeks for inventory to come from China, Goyal said.About $250 billion of Chinese goods have already been hit by 25% duties.David French, a spokesman for the National Retail Federation, said the organization was pleased by the delay on certain consumer goods but expressed caution.“Continued uncertainty for U.S. businesses and consumers is a drag on the economy,” he said. “What we really need is an effective strategy to address China’s unfair trade practices by working with our allies instead of using unilateral tariffs that cost American jobs and hurt consumers.”Chinese Vice Premier Liu He talked with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin by phone on Tuesday, Chinese and U.S. officials said. Another conference call is planned again in two weeks. It’s still unclear if an in-person meeting would take place sometime in September.But whether the two sides had made any progress was unclear and some analysts saw Tuesday’s move to delay some tariffs as a sign of Trump’s political vulnerabilities at home as much as an olive branch to China.“It shows the increasing chaos of the administration’s trade strategy toward China. And despite the president’s claims, it’s the clearest sign yet that Trump actually does understand that the tariffs are hurting American companies and consumers,” said Edward Alden, a trade expert at the Council on Foreign Relations. “It will also further weaken the already slim chances for any negotiating progress in September. Why would the Chinese make difficult decisions if they can wait out Trump and wait for him to fold when the stock market sags?”Scott Kennedy, a China expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, said there was still a danger of further escalation, especially around the tech sector. “But much of this is just keeping up appearances for a strategy that hasn’t succeeded,” he said. “That does not mean that the U.S. and China are likely to reach a trade deal, but rather that the relationship will be stuck in this purgatory for the remainder of the current administration.”What Our Economists Say“Speak to businesses and it’s the uncertainty -- not knowing if a tweet from President Donald Trump will break a crucial supply chain or block access to a market -- that’s weighing on investment and hiring decisions. A surprise delay to tariffs, and the creation of a new artificial deadline on Dec. 15, will do little to resolve it.”Tom Orlik, Bloomberg EconomicsClick here for the full note.The International Monetary Fund last month cited trade tensions as one of the biggest risks to the global economy as it downgraded its 2019 growth forecast, while Goldman Sachs has said there’s growing concerns that the trade war will trigger a U.S. recession. A Bloomberg News August survey of economists gave a 35% probability of a recession in the next 12 months, up from 31% previously.Trump’s Aug. 1 announcement about the new duties ended a tentative trade truce that he forged with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the end of June in Japan, just as the two sides were resuming negotiations. In the past week tensions have escalated further as the U.S. Treasury Department formally labeled China a currency manipulator.(Updates with Asia markets from second paragraph.)\--With assistance from Jonathan Roeder, Jordyn Holman, Joe Deaux, Justin Sink, Eddie Spence, Dominic Carey, Chris Middleton, Jeffrey Black and Jiyeun Lee.To contact the reporters on this story: Shawn Donnan in Washington at sdonnan@bloomberg.net;Jenny Leonard in Washington at jleonard67@bloomberg.net;Olivia Rockeman in New York at orockeman1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Margaret Collins at mcollins45@bloomberg.net, ;Brendan Murray at brmurray@bloomberg.net, Sarah McGregor, Robert JamesonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Global Net Lease Inc (GNL) Q2 2019 Earnings Call Transcript
    Motley Fool

    Global Net Lease Inc (GNL) Q2 2019 Earnings Call Transcript

    GNL earnings call for the period ending June 30, 2019.

  • Will Tariffs Impact Dollar Tree? Deutsche Bank Thinks So
    Market Realist

    Will Tariffs Impact Dollar Tree? Deutsche Bank Thinks So

    Deutsche Bank downgraded Dollar Tree stock to a “hold” from a “buy” yesterday. It believes the newly announced tariffs will negatively affect the retailer.

  • Investing.com

    Stocks - Tyson, Fox Rise Premarket; Uber, Dollar Tree Fall

    Investing.com - Stocks in focus in premarket trading on Monday:

  • Why Wells Fargo Downgraded Dollar General Stock
    Market Realist

    Why Wells Fargo Downgraded Dollar General Stock

    Wells Fargo downgraded Dollar General (DG) stock to “market perform” from “outperform” on July 25. It remains positive about the company’s prospects.

  • 3 Top Retail Stocks to Watch in July
    Motley Fool

    3 Top Retail Stocks to Watch in July

    Consider putting these promising stocks on your shopping list.

  • Costco Displays Solid 6-Month Run-Up, Adds More Than 25%
    Zacks

    Costco Displays Solid 6-Month Run-Up, Adds More Than 25%

    Costco (COST) continues to be one of the dominant warehouse retailers based on the breadth and quality of merchandise offered.

  • Dollar General's Sturdy Comps & Better Pricing to Fuel Sales
    Zacks

    Dollar General's Sturdy Comps & Better Pricing to Fuel Sales

    In spite of a tough retail landscape, Dollar General (DG) has been thriving, when many other traditional operators are finding it difficult to cope.

  • Dollar Tree (DLTR) Up 31% in a Year: Will Momentum Sustain?
    Zacks

    Dollar Tree (DLTR) Up 31% in a Year: Will Momentum Sustain?

    Dollar Tree (DLTR) is undertaking significant store renovation initiatives for Family Dollar to attract more customers. Also, the company has been displaying remarkable comps growth.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Verizon, McDonald's, Lockheed Martin, Capital One and Dollar Tree
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Verizon, McDonald's, Lockheed Martin, Capital One and Dollar Tree

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Verizon, McDonald's, Lockheed Martin, Capital One and Dollar Tree

  • Top Analyst Reports for Verizon, McDonald's & Lockheed Martin
    Zacks

    Top Analyst Reports for Verizon, McDonald's & Lockheed Martin

    Top Analyst Reports for Verizon, McDonald's & Lockheed Martin

  • Should Dollar Tree Abandon Its One Dollar Roots?
    Motley Fool

    Should Dollar Tree Abandon Its One Dollar Roots?

    The retailer is known for pricing all items at $1 or less, but it's now experimenting with bigger price tags.

  • Costco (COST) Stellar Comps Shape Stock's Bullish Course
    Zacks

    Costco (COST) Stellar Comps Shape Stock's Bullish Course

    In the changing retail landscape, Costco (COST) has been able to create a niche for itself on the back of growth strategies. These factors are aiding the company in sustaining impressive comparable sales run.

  • Barrons.com

    The Trade War Won’t Derail the Dollar Tree Rebound, Analyst Says

    Dollar Tree stock’s turnaround has been interrupted by the trade war between the U.S. and China. But JPMorgan still thinks the company’s rebound will continue.

  • Dollar Tree: JPMorgan Chase Upgraded the Stock to ‘Overweight’
    Market Realist

    Dollar Tree: JPMorgan Chase Upgraded the Stock to ‘Overweight’

    Dollar Tree: JPMorgan Chase Upgraded the Stock to 'Overweight'Rating upgradeDollar Tree (DLTR) stock has risen 2.9% as of 11:24 AM EST on June 11. JPMorgan Chase upgraded the stock to “overweight” from “neutral.” JPMorgan Chase increased

  • Trump's trade war hasn't hurt the dollar stores (yet)
    Yahoo Finance

    Trump's trade war hasn't hurt the dollar stores (yet)

    Dollar stores are hanging tough despite Trump's tariffs. Here's why.

  • Comparing Sales Outlook of Dollar General and Dollar Tree
    Market Realist

    Comparing Sales Outlook of Dollar General and Dollar Tree

    Dollar General or Dollar Tree: Who Fared Better in Q1?(Continued from Prior Part)Sales growth in Q1Dollar General (DG) and Dollar Tree (DLTR) surpassed analysts’ sales expectations for the first quarter of fiscal 2019. Dollar General generated

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