ENI.BR - Eni S.p.A.

Brussels - Brussels Delayed price. Currency in EUR
11.75
-0.75 (-5.98%)
As of 3:48PM CET. Market open.
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Previous close12.50
Open11.95
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's range11.75 - 12.50
52-week range11.75 - 16.17
Volume562
Avg. volume619
Market cap41.219B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.79
PE ratio (TTM)17.33
EPS (TTM)0.68
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield0.86 (6.88%)
Ex-dividend date23 Sep 2019
1y target estN/A
  • Pakistan LNG Mulls Axing Supply Deals as Cheap Options Arise
    Bloomberg

    Pakistan LNG Mulls Axing Supply Deals as Cheap Options Arise

    (Bloomberg) -- Pakistan’s main buyer of liquefied natural gas is considering canceling two long-term contracts as a slump in spot prices and abundant production create opportunities for cheaper supply, according to people familiar with the situation.State-owned Pakistan LNG Ltd. is weighing the possibility of exercising termination clauses in contracts it signed with Eni SpA and Gunvor Group Ltd. in 2017, according to the people, who asked not to be identified because the matter is private. No final decision has been made and the company is seeking input from the Ministry of Energy, said the people. Canceling both deals may cost the Pakistani firm nearly $300 million in penalties, according to Bloomberg calculations.Pakistan LNG directed questions to the energy ministry, which didn’t respond to requests for comment. Gunvor declined to comment, while Eni didn’t respond to requests for comment.A glut of new LNG supply and sputtering demand growth have sent spot prices to record lows, straining more expensive long-term supply deals based on oil prices. The global oversupply may persist over the next few years, analysts including Morgan Stanley forecast, stoking speculation that buyers will be pressuring sellers for revisions to term contracts.Pakistan isn’t alone in seeking better deals. Japan’s Osaka Gas entered into arbitration last year with the marketing unit of Exxon Mobil Corp.’s PNG LNG project after a dispute during a price review. Indian gas importers have started discussions with Qatar on moving away from linking LNG prices to oil and are seeking cheaper rates. In 2015, Petronet LNG reworked the pricing formula in its 25-year contract with Qatar’s RasGas that resulted in lower prices.See also: LNG Buyer Cancels Cargoes From Biggest U.S. Exporter in GlutPakistan LNG is still open to sourcing supplies through new or revised contracts if the pricing terms are more favorable, according to one of the people. The South Asian nation is seen as one of the biggest growth markets for the fuel, with BloombergNEF forecasting imports could grow 80% from last year’s level to 2023.Under the terms of the contracts, which are posted on Pakistan LNG’s website, the company must give a 90-day termination notice and pay damages equal to the value of six cargoes, which is based on average Brent prices for the three months preceding the month the notice is served. That would be about $142.5 million for the Gunvor deal and $148.8 million for Eni, according to Bloomberg calculations based on front-month Brent futures traded on ICE Futures Europe.The two deals are linked to oil at a rate that prices cargoes more than double what’s currently available through the spot market. The Gunvor contract, which runs for five years to June 2022, is priced at 11.62% of Brent -- or about $7.42 per million Btu according to Bloomberg calculations using the average of November to January.The Eni contract, which runs for 15 years to 2032, is priced at 11.6247% for the first two years, 11.95% for the following two years, then 12.14% for the remaining 11 years, according to one of the people. Both deals are for one cargo per month.The Japan/Korea Marker, the spot Asian LNG benchmark published by S&P Global Platts, has dropped more than 50% in the past year and reached a record low this month of $2.71 per million British thermal units. Front-month futures traded at $2.90 per per million Btu on Tuesday in New York. A spot cargo to neighboring India was purchased recently for as low as $2.40 per million Btu.(Updates with price in last paragraph)\--With assistance from Anna Shiryaevskaya and Andy Hoffman.To contact the reporters on this story: Stephen Stapczynski in Singapore at sstapczynsk1@bloomberg.net;Faseeh Mangi in Karachi at fmangi@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ramsey Al-Rikabi at ralrikabi@bloomberg.net, Jasmine NgFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Are Eni S.p.A.’s (BIT:ENI) Returns On Investment Worth Your While?
    Simply Wall St.

    Are Eni S.p.A.’s (BIT:ENI) Returns On Investment Worth Your While?

    Today we'll evaluate Eni S.p.A. (BIT:ENI) to determine whether it could have potential as an investment idea. In...

  • Uncertainty Brings An End To The Oil Price Rebound
    Oilprice.com

    Uncertainty Brings An End To The Oil Price Rebound

    The latest five-day oil rally has been brought to an end by market uncertainty surrounding OPEC+ production cuts and a recovery in Chinese demand

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    No reform, no cash: majors hold out for new Nigerian oil law

    A Nigerian oil reform two decades in the making is urgently needed to get money into its energy sector, industry executives say, as tax increases and regulatory uncertainty scupper investments. Africa's largest oil exporting nation has not carried out a full revamp of the law underpinning its oil and gas sector since the 1960s. Government officials say a sweeping overhaul is imminent and will be presented to the National Assembly next week, which for industry leaders is not a moment too soon.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Italy's Edison starts exploratory drilling for gas in Egypt

    Italian energy group Edison has begun drilling an exploratory well in deepwater acreage in Egypt, not far from other giant east Mediterranean gas fields, the CEO of Israel-focused gas driller Energean said on Wednesday. Energean is in the process of taking over Edison's Egyptian assets in a deal reached last year. "We're drilling right now in North Thekah, a deep water exploration ... it started a couple weeks ago," Energean CEO Mathios Rigas told reporters on the sidelines of an energy conference in Cairo.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Italian court throws out witness request in Eni Nigeria graft case

    A Milan court has rejected a prosecution request to hear testimony from a former legal adviser of Eni who has accused the company of spying on judges, offering a boost to the Italian oil firm as it fights bribery allegations over a Nigerian oil field. The ruling removes the prospect of months of testimony voicing allegations of wrongdoing by Eni and sets a timetable for finally reaching a verdict in the long-running case. The decision is the second piece of bad news in a few days for Milan prosecutors after a witness last week refused to confirm a key statement.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Russia's Transneft faces 'dirty oil' claims of up to $1 bln - industry sources

    Russian oil pipeline monopoly Transneft faces claims of up to $1 billion related to contaminated oil, more than double its own estimates, industry sources said, setting the stage for protracted haggling with oil suppliers. Up to 5 million tonnes of tainted Russian oil was contaminated en route to central Europe via the Druzhba pipeline. State-owned Transneft, the supplier of Urals crude to Russia's Baltic port of Ust-Luga, as well as the operator of the Druzhba pipeline, has set aside 23 billion roubles ($371 million) for compensation related to tainted oil.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Witness backtracks on key statement in Nigeria oil graft case

    A witness in a graft case involving oil contracts in Nigeria refused to confirm a key statement during a court hearing on Wednesday, offering a possible boost to Italian oil major Eni, which is fighting allegations of bribery. In one of the oil industry's biggest scandals, Italian prosecutors allege Eni and Shell bought a Nigeria oilfield in 2011, knowing that most of the $1.3 billion purchase price would be siphoned off to agents and middlemen.

  • Are Dividend Investors Making A Mistake With Eni S.p.A. (BIT:ENI)?
    Simply Wall St.

    Are Dividend Investors Making A Mistake With Eni S.p.A. (BIT:ENI)?

    Today we'll take a closer look at Eni S.p.A. (BIT:ENI) from a dividend investor's perspective. Owning a strong...

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Congo Rep. debt could be one-third higher than IMF estimate - campaign group

    Congo Republic's public debt could be more than one-third higher than the International Monetary Fund estimated when it awarded a bailout last year because of liabilities held by the state oil company, environmental and rights group Global Witness said on Monday. If confirmed, this increase could hinder the OPEC producer's economic recovery from a downturn that began in 2014 when oil prices dropped sharply, causing debt levels to balloon to 118% of GDP in 2017. The IMF plan for Congo Republic was agreed last year after Brazzaville renegotiated a portion of its Chinese debt.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Italy tax police search offices of Eni managers in obstruction probe -sources

    Italian tax police searched the Milan offices of three managers at Eni on Thursday to widen an investigation into suspected obstruction of justice by officials at the Italian oil group, two sources said. The inquiry is still in an early phase and has been overshadowed by an ongoing corruption trial centering on the 2011 purchase of a Nigerian oilfield by Eni and oil major Royal Dutch Shell Plc. Milan prosecutors opened the obstruction case in 2018 to investigate whether in 2015 and 2016 Eni officials had sought to discredit two independent board members who later became witnesses in the Nigeria case.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Nigeria charges ex-attorney general with financial crimes in $1.3 bln oil deal

    Nigeria's financial crimes watchdog charged a former attorney general suspected of taking bribes to facilitate a $1.3 billion oil block sale, the agency said on Tuesday, in the latest twist in one of the industry's biggest alleged corruption scandals. An international investigation into the 2011 sale of the offshore oilfield known as OPL 245 by Malabu Oil and Gas has entangled two of the industry's biggest players, Shell and Eni, as well as an array of powerful figures from the previous Nigerian government. Mohammed Adoke, Nigeria's ex-attorney general, was charged with receiving the U.S. dollar equivalent of 300 million naira in 2013 to facilitate the OPL 245 deal and help waive taxes for Shell and Eni, according to a charge sheet filed in an Abuja high court last week.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 1-Eni, Total among winners of rights to develop Angolan "frontier" blocks

    Italian oil major Eni and France's Total were among the successful bidders for rights to develop three offshore blocks in Angola out of 10 auctioned late last year, the country's petroleum regulator said on Thursday. Eni and Total won operator rights to blocks 28 and 29 respectively in the offshore Namibe basin, while Angola's state oil company Sonangol and majors Equinor and BP won smaller stakes, regulator ANPG said in a statement. Sonangol won a 35% interest in block 27, but the remaining 65% interest is still on offer.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Angola awards licenses in 3 of 10 "frontier" blocks auctioned

    Angola has awarded rights to three offshore blocks, out of a total of 10 auctioned late last year, the country's petroleum regulator said on Thursday. Italian oil major Eni and France's Total won operator rights to blocks 28 and 29, respectively, in the offshore Namibe basin, while Angola's state oil company Sonangol and majors Equinor and BP won smaller stakes, regulator ANGP said in a statement.

  • China Opens Up to Oil Majors at the Wrong Time
    Bloomberg

    China Opens Up to Oil Majors at the Wrong Time

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Broad new horizons in key markets are opening for the world’s energy companies. Don’t expect to see a land rush any time soon. China will allow all large domestic and foreign companies to apply for oil and gas exploration licenses that were previously only open to state-owned enterprises, the country’s resources ministry said at a briefing Thursday. In India, regulators will also let private and international companies bid for a group of coal blocks it’s putting up for auction starting this month, the country’s coal and mines minister Pralhad Joshi said this week, chipping away at a near-monopoly enjoyed by state-controlled Coal India Ltd.A decade or so ago, such announcements might have caused international energy companies to salivate with excitement. All the fear back then was that state-owned giants like Saudi Arabian Oil Co. and Petroleos de Venezuela SA controlled all the viable assets to fuel a coming era of ever-increasing fossil fuel demand, leaving listed businesses running out of reserves. How things have changed.For one thing, it’s national governments rather than independent companies that are now worried about supply shortages. China’s domestic oil production has fallen about 10% since peaking five years ago. India’s coal output is still edging up, but not fast enough to meet demand: Net imports have accounted for about a quarter of consumption in recent years, up from 10% a decade ago.Meanwhile, energy companies are awash with supply. The revolution in fracking means that America’s shale patch would count as one of the world’s top three oil producers if considered on its own. It briefly overtook Saudi Arabia for the number two spot behind Russia after an attack on the Gulf country’s oil facilities in September.Conventional oil and gas discoveries are booming, too, hitting a four-year high of 12.2 billion barrels of oil equivalent last year, according to consultancy Rystad Energy AS. Storied oil majors Exxon Mobil Corp., Total SA, BP Plc and Eni SpA chalked up some of the year’s best discoveries. On the demand side, consumption of petroleum may peak as soon as a decade from now, well within the lifetime of most conventional oilfields.As a result, the interests of fossil fuel producers and the energy-hungry governments seeking to attract them are fundamentally opposed. Beijing and New Delhi ultimately want to boost domestic output at all costs, and hope that foreign businesses can sprinkle some innovative magic that local giants can’t muster. International oil companies, on the other hand, are ruing a decade when they chased barrels to the exclusion of all else. They’re now much more focused on developing only the most profitable fields, wherever they’re to be found.It’s probably unfair to characterize the state-owned Chinese and Indian companies as lazy behemoths, too. PetroChina Co.’s capital spending is bigger than that of Exxon Mobil and BP put together, and about half the wells it drills each year are in the Changqing field, where most new development is in difficult formations similar to those in the U.S. shale patch. Coal India, likewise, is hampered by the fact that most of the country’s coal is high in ash and low in energy, and dependent on a creaky rail network to make it to power stations.The problem, instead, is that the remorseless facts of poor geology make it nearly impossible to develop domestic reserves profitably, especially when government targets are driving state-owned companies to increase output with little regard for cost.Take the Qingcheng field, a corner of the Changqing deposit that counts as PetroChina’s largest single shale find. Even after recent efforts to drive down costs, the internal rate of return for Qingcheng wells is now only 8% to 9%, Cathy Chan, an analyst at CCB International Holdings Ltd., wrote in an October note.It’s fanciful to think this would tempt foreign investors. Such returns barely cover PetroChina’s own cost of capital. In Texas’s Permian basin, comparably low returns were last seen in early 2016, when the local fracking industry was on the brink of collapse. IRRs of 20% to 40% are typical for unconventional petroleum in the U.S. Given the substantial political risks that come from operating in China these days, it’s very hard to see the attraction here for international energy businesses.The best path to energy security for China and India is to encourage their own renewable energy and electrified transport industries — an approach that will improve the health of their populations, reduce climate risks, and leave them far less dependent on imported fuels. That’s a much better idea than wasting money trying to get blood from a stone, or hoping that clever foreigners will be able to find hidden deposits where local talent has failed.To contact the author of this story: David Fickling at dfickling@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Rachel Rosenthal at rrosenthal21@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.David Fickling is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities, as well as industrial and consumer companies. He has been a reporter for Bloomberg News, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and the Guardian.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Is Eni S.p.A.'s (BIT:ENI) High P/E Ratio A Problem For Investors?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Eni S.p.A.'s (BIT:ENI) High P/E Ratio A Problem For Investors?

    This article is written for those who want to get better at using price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios). We'll apply a...

  • Is Eni S.p.A.'s (BIT:ENI) ROE Of 4.8% Concerning?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Eni S.p.A.'s (BIT:ENI) ROE Of 4.8% Concerning?

    Many investors are still learning about the various metrics that can be useful when analysing a stock. This article is...

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