EZJ.L - easyJet plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
1,100.50
-9.50 (-0.86%)
At close: 4:35PM GMT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close1,110.00
Open1,056.50
Bid1,104.00 x 0
Ask1,107.50 x 0
Day's range1,031.03 - 1,124.25
52-week range840.00 - 1,570.00
Volume8,232,096
Avg. volume2,083,037
Market cap4.369B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.01
PE ratio (TTM)12.53
EPS (TTM)87.80
Earnings date14 May 2020
Forward dividend & yield0.44 (3.95%)
Ex-dividend date27 Feb 2020
1y target est1,479.74
  • Airlines at centre of storm as coronavirus spreads
    Reuters

    Airlines at centre of storm as coronavirus spreads

    A new coronavirus, which emerged late last year in China, has sent demand for travel tumbling in recent weeks as the outbreak has spread around the world, raising fears of a pandemic that could plunge the global economy into recession. Lower air traffic growth projections prompted Spanish travel technology firm Amadeus to forecast slower 2020 core profit growth on Friday, but it stressed the outlook did not yet account for the uncertain impact of the virus outbreak.

  • Airlines at center of storm as coronavirus spreads
    Reuters

    Airlines at center of storm as coronavirus spreads

    A new coronavirus, which emerged late last year in China, has sent demand for travel tumbling in recent weeks as the outbreak has spread around the world, raising fears of a pandemic that could plunge the global economy into recession. Lower air traffic growth projections prompted Spanish travel technology firm Amadeus to forecast slower 2020 core profit growth on Friday, but it stressed the outlook did not yet account for the uncertain impact of the virus outbreak.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    WRAPUP 2-Airlines at centre of storm as coronavirus spreads

    A new coronavirus, which emerged late last year in China, has sent demand for travel tumbling in recent weeks as the outbreak has spread around the world, raising fears of a pandemic that could plunge the global economy into recession. IAG, which also owns Iberia and Aer Lingus, usually gives an earnings forecast at this time of year, but said the uncertainty over the impact and duration of the coronavirus outbreak meant it could not give accurate guidance at this stage.

  • Airlines Feel Virus Pain With Travel Suspended, Events Canceled
    Bloomberg

    Airlines Feel Virus Pain With Travel Suspended, Events Canceled

    (Bloomberg) -- Europe’s travel industry is headed for its worst stock rout since the financial crisis more than a decade ago as the global spread of the coronavirus disrupts people’s movements and forces companies from Deutsche Lufthansa AG to British Airways to cut back their earnings projections.On Friday, British Airways parent IAG SA became the latest company to warn of the virus’s impact, saying it cannot provide an earnings forecast this year because weakened demand in Asia has now rippled across to Europe. Discount specialist EasyJet Plc said it will cancel some flights in response to slower demand across Italy, the epicenter of the outbreak in Europe, and other markets in the region.Airlines, airports and hotel operators are feeling the brunt of the growing virus crisis, with companies putting lucrative corporate travel on hold, industry groups canceling major events and leasure travelers reconsidering their vacation bookings. Swiss authorities on Friday banned events that draw more than 1,000 people, all but ensuring that next week’s Geneva International Motor Show won’t go ahead as planned.The International Air Transport Association has forecast that the industry will see its first annual decline in global passenger demand in over a decade in 2020, primarily weighed down by the impact of the virus in China. The next weeks will determine the severity of the crisis for the industry because the crucial summer-booking months are fast approaching, Daniel Roeska, senior transport analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein Ltd., said in a Bloomberg Television interview.“If we get a grip on this within the next three to four weeks, possibly it may not be quite as bad,” Roeska said. “But if it drags on into Easter and we don’t gain a higher comfort level than we have now, that’s going to be even tougher for European airlines.”Tough OutlookIAG slumped as much as 9.7%, the biggest drop on Europe’s Stoxx 600 Index, while EasyJet fell as much as 6.4% in London. In Frankfurt, Lufthansa was down as much as 6.1%. The Stoxx 600 Travel & Leisure Index is down 18% this week, headed for its worst return since late 2008.Besides curtailing some routes that connect to most affected regions, airlines have begun aggressively cutting costs to dig in for the longer term. Lufthansa said on Feb. 26 that it would implement a hiring freeze and expand part-time work options. Alitalia plans to extend temporary layoffs for about 4,000 workers following the coronavirus outbreak in Italy.Even before the virus outbreak, the travel industry had faced a tough start to the year amid a growing groundswell of people cutting back on what they perceive as non-essential travel. The trade tensions between the U.S and China have also put a damper on air freight, which fell the most last year since 2009, according to IATA.British Airways scrapped flights to China through the middle of April, and pared frequencies through March to Northern Italy and South Korea due to lower demand. Spanish unit Iberia has canceled flights to Shanghai to the end of April, and is allowing customers to postpone flights to Italy and Japan.“It’s a rapidly changing situation,” with weaker airlines in Europe in danger of failing, said IAG Chief Executive Officer Willie Walsh.Staying PutThe fallout has also affected auxiliary industry, from Amadeus IT Group SA, which operates the industry’s largest booking network, to Airbus SE, the world’s biggest maker of commercial jets that counts China as a major source of revenue.Amadeus reported ticket sales are decelerating globally, while Airbus shares fell as much as 7% on Friday. Fraport AG, the operator of the Frankfurt airport, said this week it would review all major investments, and that passenger and freight traffic to China and wider Asia had taken a major hit. Some companies have required employees to abandon business travel. Nestle SA, the Swiss maker of KitKat snack bars and Nespresso capsules, told employees to avoid traveling until at least mid-March. A similar recommendation at L’Oreal SA, the cosmetics owner of global brands like Lancome and Maybelline, extends through March 31. British American Tobacco Plc, the maker of Lucky Strike cigarettes, said it reduced travel to the bare minimum.A number of corporate exhibitions that usually draw large crowds have been outright canceled, including the Geneva luxury watch show that had been scheduled for April 25-28. While the falling oil price stands to benefit an industry that counts fuel costs as its single biggest expense, it probably won’t be enough to compensate for the damage wrought by the travel slump, Roeska of Bernstein said. Oil is on course for its biggest weekly loss since 2011, with crude prices down more than 14% this week.Still, the fallout does provide airlines with an opportunity to implement adjustments that will help streamline their operations, he said. These include review of fleet requirements, discretionary spending and capacity cuts on poorly performing routes.“This is a good time to approach these,” Roeska said. “Never let a good crisis go to waste.”\--With assistance from Matthew Miller and Anna Edwards.To contact the reporter on this story: Siddharth Philip in London at sphilip3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Anthony Palazzo at apalazzo@bloomberg.net, Benedikt KammelFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • BA-owner and easyJet warn on coronavirus impact
    Yahoo Finance UK

    BA-owner and easyJet warn on coronavirus impact

    Both easyJet and British Airways are cutting flights in the face of falling demand for travel, as coronavirus continues to spread around the world.

  • These 3 FTSE 100 stocks have crashed up to 44%. I’d buy them today
    Fool.co.uk

    These 3 FTSE 100 stocks have crashed up to 44%. I’d buy them today

    G A Chester suggests investors should be 'greedy when others are fearful' with these three big FTSE 100 fallers.The post These 3 FTSE 100 stocks have crashed up to 44%. I'd buy them today appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • EasyJet to cancel flights as coronavirus hits demand
    Reuters

    EasyJet to cancel flights as coronavirus hits demand

    British budget airline easyJet said on Friday it would cancel flights and cut costs across its business after the coronavirus outbreak hit demand for travel to Italy and other European markets. EasyJet said it had seen a "significant" softening of demand into and out of its northern Italian bases and a reduction across its other European markets following the increased incidence of coronavirus. As a result it will be cancelling some flights, particularly those into and out of Italy, while continuing to monitor the situation and adapting its flying programme to support demand, the airline said.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    EasyJet warns of softer Italian demand in wake of coronavirus

    British budget airline easyJet warned on Friday it had seen a significant softening of demand and load factors into and out of its northern Italian bases and slower demand in other European markets due to coronavirus.

  • The easyJet share price is dirt cheap! Here’s what I’d do now
    Fool.co.uk

    The easyJet share price is dirt cheap! Here’s what I’d do now

    easyJet has shot to the top of the most traded FTSE 100 shares list. Is the budget UK airline now a screaming buy or a value trap?The post The easyJet share price is dirt cheap! Here's what I'd do now appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Is now a good time to buy shares in easyJet, Ryanair, and TUI?
    Fool.co.uk

    Is now a good time to buy shares in easyJet, Ryanair, and TUI?

    Shares in Ryanair, easyJet, and TUI have fallen sharply in recent days. Is now a good time to buy?The post Is now a good time to buy shares in easyJet, Ryanair, and TUI? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • What to Watch: Topps Tiles and WPP shares crash, virus spooks European markets
    Yahoo Finance UK

    What to Watch: Topps Tiles and WPP shares crash, virus spooks European markets

    A daily overview of the top business, market and economic stories you should be watching today in the UK and abroad.

  • Global stock turmoil deepens as investors panic over coronavirus
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Global stock turmoil deepens as investors panic over coronavirus

    Investors are assessing the longer-term impact of the spread of coronavirus on trade, supply chains, and consumer confidence.

  • Suddenly, That Beach Holiday Has Lost Its Appeal
    Bloomberg

    Suddenly, That Beach Holiday Has Lost Its Appeal

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The deadly coronavirus has spread to European holiday destinations. That’s of huge concern to a travel industry that will soon be gearing up for its peak summer season.When the outbreak emerged in China, worries centered on airlines and hotels in that region, as well as valuable outbound tourism from the country. But now the disease has shown up in Italy, and notably in Spain’s Canary Islands, shorter haul European travel is being drawn into the fray.Shares in TUI AG, Europe’s biggest travel operator, have fallen about 18% this week, while those of the budget airlines EasyJet Plc and Ryanair Holdings Plc are down by about 20%.Already reeling from the “flight shame” phenomenon, which has seen some environmentally conscious consumers shunning air travel, and disruption from grounded Boeing 737 Max jets, a global viral outbreak will have a profound effect on the confidence of travelers and vacationers everywhere.Europe’s peak period for early holiday bookings, stretching from Boxing Day to the third week of January, ended just as the virus was emerging. The first Saturday in January is known as “Sunshine Saturday,” when holidaymakers hit the travel agents or, more probably, buy their flight and accommodation on the internet.But even booked trips are at risk of cancellation as Europeans digest what’s happening in the Spanish holiday island of Tenerife, where 700 people have been contained in a hotel after several guests were found to have the virus. What’s more troubling for the travel industry is that most of their profit doesn’t come from early bookers, but rather from people who are buying holidays from now onward.The outbreak in northern Italy is equally difficult for the airlines (it is a big part of Ryanair’s business) and travel companies, but that country tends to offer more upmarket destinations. The Canary Islands and mainland Spain — where some cases have also been identified —  are firmly in the middle and mass markets, so the impact there could be bigger. TUI AG’s RIU hotel chain has a strong presence in Spain and the Canary Islands.Cruises, obviously, have been hit hard by the outbreak, given the pictures of passengers quarantined on ships being beamed around the world. That’s another big worry for TUI, which which has been building its ships business. Analysts at Morgan Stanley estimate that the volume of bookings has fallen by double digits across the whole of the cruise market in the U.S. and Europe in recent weeks.If the outbreak is contained relatively soon, the effect on tour operators might be short-lived. Holidaymakers who have held off from booking should come back to the market. But if infections continue beyond May, as looks increasingly likely, the industry’s problems will intensify.At this point, the travel groups are usually snapping up airline capacity for the peak summer months. As they make all of their profit during this period, a prolonged outbreak now would be doubly damaging. One poor summer season in 2018, because of a European heatwave, helped to sink the British travel giant Thomas Cook. That company was also burdened by more than 1 billion pounds ($1.3 billion) of debt, but it’s fate underlines just how dependent the travel industry is on the traditional beach getaway.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why I think this FTSE 100 stock could be high risk and high reward
    Fool.co.uk

    Why I think this FTSE 100 stock could be high risk and high reward

    Jabran Khan reviews this FTSE 100 airline and its current investment viability.The post Why I think this FTSE 100 stock could be high risk and high reward appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Closing snapshot: Another sell-off after Black Monday

    You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@tr.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@tr.com), Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@tr.com) in London and Danilo Masoni (danilo.masoni@tr.com) in Milan. After a Black Monday that wiped nearly $474 billion off the value of European stock markets, shares in the region suffered more heavy losses. The STOXX 600 plunged to its lowest since December 11, ending down 1.8% and after losing 3.8% in the previous session.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Coronavirus: who's next?

    You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@tr.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@tr.com), Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@tr.com) in London and Danilo Masoni (danilo.masoni@tr.com) in Milan.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Airlines: virus headwinds, fuel tailwinds

    You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@tr.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@tr.com), Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@tr.com) in London and Danilo Masoni (danilo.masoni@tr.com) in Milan. AIRLINES: VIRUS HEADWINDS, FUEL TAILWINDS (1502 GMT) Airlines are struggling to recover after Monday's savage sell-off and while virus concerns are no doubt going to create some damage, falling fuel costs need to be added to the equation to get a better picture of the sector's earnings outlook. Analysts at Credit Suisse did some number crunching.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-"Crash like never before"

    You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@tr.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@tr.com), Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@tr.com) in London and Danilo Masoni (danilo.masoni@tr.com) in Milan.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Airlines plunge as Italian coronavirus outbreak threatens longer crisis

    PARIS/LONDON, Feb 24 (Reuters) - European budget airlines bore the brunt of Monday's plunge in global stock markets as the arrival of the coronavirus in Italy pointed to a longer, deeper crisis than many have banked on. EasyJet dropped 16.4% and Ryanair 13.5% as airlines were forced to reassess the fallout from the rapid spread of the COVID-19 virus across Asia and beyond, with South Korea, Italy and Iran now struggling to contain outbreaks. "Concerns are growing that COVID-19 continues to spread and will impact demand to and from other European countries," Credit Suisse analysts said.

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