F - Ford Motor Company

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
6.06
-0.04 (-0.66%)
At close: 4:02PM EDT

6.14 +0.08 (1.32%)
After hours: 7:59PM EDT

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close6.10
Open6.15
Bid6.06 x 36100
Ask6.09 x 39400
Day's range6.05 - 6.22
52-week range3.96 - 10.56
Volume78,147,331
Avg. volume88,631,626
Market cap24.101B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.30
PE ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-0.78
Earnings date30 Jul 2020
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend date29 Jan 2020
1y target est6.20
  • Ford blends tech and nostalgia in the 2021 Bronco
    TechCrunch

    Ford blends tech and nostalgia in the 2021 Bronco

    After 24 years, Ford relaunched the 2021 Bronco in a splashy reveal streamed Monday evening on ABC, ESPN and National Geographic, each short film showcasing a different member of the family: the Bronco 2-door, Bronco 4-door and Bronco Sport. The Bronco 2021 — Ford's flagship series of 4x4 vehicles — is a brand that leans heavily on nostalgia, customization, functional design and technology such as the automaker's next-generation infotainment system and a digital trail mapping feature that lets owners plan, record and share their experiences via an app. This is not the 1966 Ford Bronco, the first year that the rugged two-door off-roader came to market to compete with the Jeep CJ-5.

  • Business Wire

    Ford to Discuss Return of Legendary Bronco with BofA Securities

    Ford Motor Co. will discuss with BofA Securities the return of its famed Bronco brand and the launch of an all-new family of rugged, off-road Bronco vehicles on Friday, July 17.

  • Auto Stock Roundup: Ford's Q2 China Sales, Asbury-Park Place Deal & More
    Zacks

    Auto Stock Roundup: Ford's Q2 China Sales, Asbury-Park Place Deal & More

    While Ford's (F) second-quarter vehicle sales in China rise 3% year over year, Asbury (ABG) is set to acquire Park Place dealerships.

  • Ford's (F) Q2 China Sales Snap 3-Year Slump, Rise 3% Y/Y
    Zacks

    Ford's (F) Q2 China Sales Snap 3-Year Slump, Rise 3% Y/Y

    A strong vehicle lineup and robust demand amid the lifting of coronavirus-induced lockdown restrictions in China drive Ford's (F) second-quarter sales in the country.

  • Here's a Glimmer of Hope for Ford Investors
    Motley Fool

    Here's a Glimmer of Hope for Ford Investors

    For investors who have watched COVID-19 put the global automotive industry through pain, whether it's suppliers, manufacturers, dealerships, or many others, there's a glimmer of hope that automakers could recover from China's slump sooner than originally believed. Ford sold nearly 159,000 vehicles during the second quarter. Ford's transit commercial vehicles grew 60.9% compared to the prior year, and Lincoln luxury vehicles gained 12%.

  • Ford Motor’s China Vehicle Sales Rebound 3% in June Quarter as Coronavirus Restrictions Ease
    FX Empire

    Ford Motor’s China Vehicle Sales Rebound 3% in June Quarter as Coronavirus Restrictions Ease

    Ford Motor Co said that its vehicle sales in mainland China rebounded in the June quarter, growing 3% from the same period last year, largely driven by strong demand following the lifting of COVID-19 pandemic restrictions.

  • Ford's quarterly China sales rise for the first time in three years
    Reuters

    Ford's quarterly China sales rise for the first time in three years

    Ford Motor Co <F.N> said its China vehicle sales increased 3% in April-June from a year earlier, its first quarterly sales rise in the world's bigggest auto market in almost three years. Ford has been seeking to recover from a slump in sales unprecedented for a major global automaker in China, with sales sinking 26% last year after a 37% drop in 2018. China sales for the second quarter climbed to 158,589 units, Ford said in a statement, attributing the rise to a stronger vehicle lineup including new sport-utility vehicles and locally-made luxury Lincoln cars and "strong demand following the lifting of COVID-19 pandemic restrictions".

  • Why Nikola shares 'look attractive' long-term: JPMorgan analyst
    Yahoo Finance

    Why Nikola shares 'look attractive' long-term: JPMorgan analyst

    Shares of Nikola are “starting to look attractive for long-term investors” says JPMorgan analyst Paul Coster, upgrading the stock to Overweight from Neutral.

  • Facebook Scorned by Advocacy Groups After Zuckerberg Meeting
    Bloomberg

    Facebook Scorned by Advocacy Groups After Zuckerberg Meeting

    (Bloomberg) -- Civil rights organizations criticized Facebook Inc. following a meeting with top executives Tuesday, claiming the company hasn’t taken seriously demands to better police its service from hate speech and misinformation.“Facebook approached our meeting today like it was nothing more than a PR exercise,” Jessica González, co-chief executive officer of Free Press, a non-profit media advocacy group, said in a statement following the meeting. “I’m deeply disappointed that Facebook still refuses to hold itself accountable to its users, its advertisers and society at large.”Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg also met with members of the NAACP, the Anti-Defamation League and Color of Change, who have organized a boycott of the company’s advertising products in seeking to prompt change. The executives didn’t “commit to a timeline” to remove disinformation and hate speech, Gonzalez said, but instead “delivered the same old talking points to try to placate us without meeting our demands.”“The meeting we just left was a disappointment,” said Rashad Robinson, president of Color of Change, on a call with reporters.The forum, which lasted about an hour and was held over video conference, was intended to be a venue to discuss proposed solutions to making the Facebook platform less toxic, such as adding executives with civil rights experience to its top ranks and fact-checking political speech, among other changes.“Today we saw little and heard just about nothing,” said Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, who was in the meeting. “The company is functionally flawed.”Since the groups called for the boycott, hundreds of advertisers, including well-known brands such as Unilever NV, Verizon Communications Inc., and Coca-Cola Co., have announced plans to pull advertising from Facebook’s properties over criticism the company doesn’t do enough to police user content. As the boycott grew, Facebook approached the civil rights organizations about a meeting, though the groups refused to meet without Zuckerberg in attendance.“They want Facebook to be free of hate speech and so do we,” Facebook said in a statement following the meeting. The company pointed to efforts it has made in recent years, including a mention of an audit of its policies and practices and noting that it has spent billions of dollars building systems to police its service. “We know we will be judged by our actions not by our words and are grateful to these groups and many others for their continued engagement.”Facebook has defended its attempts to fight hate speech and voter suppression in emails and phone calls with advertisers, talking up the company’s automated systems which find and remove these kinds of posts automatically. The company has also highlighted a voter registration initiative through which it hopes to register 4 million voters before the 2020 election.Greenblatt described Facebook’s claim that it catches 89% of hate speech automatically as an unacceptable number. “The Ford Motor Co. can’t say that 89% of our fleet has seatbelts that work,” he said, adding that it would require a recall. “Maybe it’s time we recall Facebook Groups? Maybe it’s time we recall the News Feed?”Another topic of discussion on the call was the civil rights audit of Facebook’s policies, which the company first started in mid-2018. Facebook, which has said it will publish the full report Wednesday, previewed some of the results with the civil rights groups during the meeting. The audit was carried out by a third party, meaning the results are independent of Facebook, but also that they are less likely to lead to change, Robinson said.“What we get is recommendations that they end up not implementing,” he added. Facebook will make some changes to add “long term civil rights infrastructure” to the company, but Robinson said the details were still “unclear.”What was clear from the outset was that the two sides wouldn’t likely come to a resolution on Tuesday. In a post before the meeting started, Sandberg acknowledged that Facebook needs to do more to fight hate speech, but also said that the company is unlikely to implement all the recommendations from the civil rights audit.The civil rights groups said that their fight with Facebook is far from over. “I believe this campaign will continue to grow,” Greenblatt said. “It will get more global, it will get more intense until we get the answers that I think we are looking for.”(Updates with more details from meeting starting from sixth paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bearish Tesla analyst explains why shares could surge to $2,070
    Yahoo Finance

    Bearish Tesla analyst explains why shares could surge to $2,070

    In a bull case, Tesla shares could surge as high as $2070, says Morgan Stanley’s Adam Jonas — though his official call is still bearish with a target of $740.

  • Why Shares of Velodyne Lidar Acquirer, Graf Industrial, Are Trading Lower Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Shares of Velodyne Lidar Acquirer, Graf Industrial, Are Trading Lower Today

    Shares of Graf Industrial (NYSE: GRAF) were trading lower on Tuesday, amid a broader sell-off of stocks in companies focused on the future of transportation. Graf is a special-purpose acquisition company that last week announced a deal to merge with Velodyne Lidar, the largest maker of lidar sensors. Velodyne's lidar sensors are used by highly automated and prototype self-driving vehicles, as well as by some types of robots.

  • Motor Show Schedules Turn Topsy-Turvy, Launches Go Digital
    Zacks

    Motor Show Schedules Turn Topsy-Turvy, Launches Go Digital

    Amid the coronavirus mayhem, which has caused motor show schedules go haywire, automakers are now aggressively switching from in-person reveals to online events.

  • Auto Stock Roundup: General Motors' $223M Contract, Ford-Disney Pact & More
    Zacks

    Auto Stock Roundup: General Motors' $223M Contract, Ford-Disney Pact & More

    While General Motors' (GM) defense arm secures contracts worth $223 million to manufacture infantry squad vehicle, Ford (F) ties up with Disney for the launch of its Bronco SUV.

  • Reuters

    Ford's Bronco SUV bucking to take on FCA's Jeep

    Ford Motor Co <F.N> on Monday rolled out the product and marketing strategy for its new family of Bronco SUVs designed to take a bite out of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles' <FCHA.MI> <FCAU.N> profitable Jeep franchise. Ford's Bronco lineup, launching later this month, will include two- and four-door models, as well as a smaller Bronco Sport. The vehicles' boxy looks, their new bucking bronco logo, a "Bronco Nation" online fan club along with the "Built Wild" marketing campaign are all part of Ford's plan to muscle into the lucrative off-road adventure segment that Jeep has dominated for decades.

  • Facebook Helps Explain Why ESG Investing Matters
    Bloomberg

    Facebook Helps Explain Why ESG Investing Matters

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- If you’re not clear on Environmental, Social and Governance investing, you’re not alone. The Department of Labor appears to be just as confused. Luckily, Facebook Inc. may serve as an example to help clarify the burgeoning investing movement. The Labor Department issued a proposed rule recently that is being widely interpreted as a ban on ESG investing in retirement accounts. A news release said the rule “is intended to provide clear regulatory guideposts” for corporate pensions and 401(k) plans around ESG investing. What it’s actually doing, however, is sowing utter confusion.  “Private employer-sponsored retirement plans are not vehicles for furthering social goals or policy objectives that are not in the financial interest of the plan,” Secretary of Labor Eugene Scalia said. But ESG has nothing to do with furthering social goals or policy objectives. By definition, ESG investing is strictly a financial endeavor, an attempt to improve the performance of portfolios by limiting their exposure to companies whose environmental, social or governance policies, or lack of them, are deemed risky. In that regard, it’s no different from striking a balance between stocks and bonds, investment-grade bonds and junk, stocks of large and small companies, or any number of decisions investors routinely make to manage risk and attempt to boost risk-adjusted returns. Consider Facebook. The social media behemoth has problems. A growing number of big corporate advertisers such as Coca-Cola Co., Starbucks Corp., Microsoft Corp. and Ford Motor Co. are pulling their ads, fearing they might appear alongside hate speech, misinformation and other divisive content routinely posted on the platform. Facebook also faces a slew of antitrust inquiries from Congress, the Justice Department and a coalition of state attorneys general, as well as increasing bipartisan calls to remove legal protections that limit the company’s liability over content posted by users. Complaints about Facebook aren’t new. There have been widespread concerns about how the company handles user data since at least 2018, when news surfaced that Cambridge Analytica had obtained personal data of up to 87 million users. But Facebook has largely ignored its critics, mainly because co-founder and Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg controls the company and doesn’t appear to share the concerns, at least not enough to do anything meaningful about them. So far, Zuckerberg has made mostly symbolic gestures, such as rolling out a new voter information hub and agreeing to meet with civil rights groups who organized the advertising boycott. Zuckerberg no doubt prefers to wield absolute power, but it’s a risky proposition for Facebook’s shareholders. There is growing evidence that companies with strong governance generally perform better and are less likely to fail than those with weak governance, which also makes them a less volatile and better-performing investment over time. The best ones have policies that hold management accountable and balance the competing demands of shareholders, creditors, workers, suppliers, customers and regulators. Suffice it to say, while Zuckerberg is on the throne, Facebook has few of those checks and balances.That’s a problem because Zuckerberg is the sole arbiter of what is and isn’t a hazard for Facebook, even if all indications are to the contrary. And clearly, not everyone at the company agrees with Zuckerberg’s sanguine outlook. Facebook employees recently staged a virtual walkout, and some senior figures publicly expressed their disapproval of Zuckerberg’s laissez-faire approach to policing content. If there were a greater diversity of opinion in Facebook’s decision-making process, perhaps it would have been more attune to the many threats it now faces.    The risk posed by Facebook’s strongman governance is the “G” in ESG. Not surprisingly, Facebook receives poor marks for governance. Institutional Shareholder Services, a leading provider of ESG ratings, gives Facebook a 10 for governance, the highest risk score on its 10-point scale. And according to various governance metrics tracked by Bloomberg, such as percentage of independent directors and board size, governance has weakened at Facebook over the last decade. For investors worried about the governance risk around Facebook, reducing their exposure to the company, or even eliminating it entirely, is a reasonable financial move — one that is consistent with, in fact prescribed by, the Labor Department’s “longstanding position” that retirement plans “select investments and investment courses of action based on financial considerations relevant to the risk-adjusted economic value of a particular investment.” It’s also the essence of ESG.Scalia and the Labor Department appear to confuse ESG with what would more accurately be called socially responsible investing, or SRI, which attempts to align investors’ portfolios with their values by excluding companies and industries that conflict with those values, regardless of financial impact. It’s no less odd that the Labor Department wants to ban SRI. While I suspect SRI investors will pay a price for mixing their money and their values, there’s little evidence so far that SRI is a drag on portfolios or that it would undermine the “retirement security of American workers,” as Scalia seems to fear. So if 401(k) participants and pension beneficiaries want their money aligned with their conscience, it’s not clear why the Labor Department should stand in the way, particularly when it’s part of an administration that professes devotion to deregulation, small government and religious freedom. But at the very least, the Labor Department should clarify that it’s targeting SRI, not ESG.If the rule stands, one silver lining is that it might promote a clearer separation between ESG and SRI, which would help investors navigate the growing social investing landscape. Funds that blend the two are a particular source of confusion. The iShares ESG MSCI USA ETF, for example, both invests in stocks with strong ESG scores and excludes tobacco and weapons companies. The Labor Department’s proposed rule would presumably disqualify it from inclusion in retirement plans, and thereby discourage more funds from mixing ESG and SRI.  However the rule shakes out, one thing should be clear: When ESG takes issue with companies such as Facebook, it’s about money, not values. If the Labor Department finds that confusing, imagine how ordinary investors must feel.  This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Nir Kaissar is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the markets. He is the founder of Unison Advisors, an asset management firm. He has worked as a lawyer at Sullivan & Cromwell and a consultant at Ernst & Young. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Q2 Sales Plummet at GM and Ford as Coronavirus Takes a Toll
    Motley Fool

    Q2 Sales Plummet at GM and Ford as Coronavirus Takes a Toll

    U.S. automakers have been squeezed this year by a combination of falling demand because of the weak economy and supply constraints because of coronavirus-related plant shutdowns. GM and its dealers delivered 492,489 vehicles in the U.S. during the second quarter: down 34% year over year. All four of its brands posted sales declines in excess of 30%, including a 41.4% drop at Cadillac, which was hurt by a soft luxury vehicle market.

  • Ford Sees 33.3% Fall in Q2 Sales Volume, Partners With Disney
    Zacks

    Ford Sees 33.3% Fall in Q2 Sales Volume, Partners With Disney

    While Ford's (F) retail sales decline 14.3% in Q2, it records the best retail share of 13.3% in five years, driven by the Built for America campaign and a winning portfolio of pickups, vans and SUVs.

  • Bloomberg

    Tesla's Overexcited Fans Should Cool Down a Little

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Back when Tesla Inc. delivered 95,000 cars to customers during the spring quarter of 2019, the stock price was languishing at about $235 and Elon Musk’s electric car company was valued at “only” $40 billion. Fast forward a year and the shares are now priced at more than $1,200. With a market capitalization of $224 billion, Tesla has surpassed Toyota Motor Corp. as the world’s most valuable automaker.Yet in the second quarter of 2020, Tesla delivered 91,000 vehicles — about 5% fewer than the same period last year. That’s pretty underwhelming for a company whose fans view it as a fast-growing technology company in the mold of Amazon.com Inc., rather than a sluggish metal-bashing carmaker. So how is the massive recent jump in its market value justified?In fairness, it shows resilience to sell this many cars when the company’s main California plant was shut by the pandemic for much of the spring period. Doubtless, Tesla’s new Shanghai plant picked up the production slack, which suggests the expense and effort of getting that China factory up and running was worth it. The launch of Tesla’s new Model Y crossover vehicle will have helped. Ford Motor Co. and General Motors Co. both saw their U.S. deliveries decline by a third in the same quarter. Nevertheless, Tesla’s stock market acolytes pushed the shares up another 8% on Thursday, adding $16.5 billion to the market value. Such exuberance is hard to understand. Musk’s company sold 7,650 more vehicles than analysts expected during the second quarter, and the stock price jump equates to about $2 million of added shareholder value for each of those additional sales. This seems a little excessive given that a Tesla Model 3 sells for less than $40,000, and the profit margin on those cars is pretty slim.  The shareholder reaction makes even less sense when you consider that Tesla investors aren’t really meant to buying the stock because of the company’s current sales, which are less than 4% of Volkswagen AG’s. Rather, the investment case is a long-term one: that it will come to occupy a dominant position in clean transport and energy in the years ahead. That explains why the shares trade at 320 times its analyst-estimated earnings this year. Viewed through this lens, Tesla’s ability to shift a few thousand extra cars in recent weeks shouldn’t matter so much for the valuation.  Investors’ tendency to overreact to Tesla news made more sense when its survival was open to doubt. A year ago it was laying off workers, U.S. sales were slowing and its retail strategy was confused. Senior staff kept heading for the exit. The company was burning through cash and ran pretty low on financial fuel. It had just $2.2 billion of cash in March 2019, compared with more than $8 billion now.But subsequent evidence that Tesla can sell cars for more than it costs to produce them has transformed the mood — and with it Tesla’s stock price.Instead of “killing” off Tesla, the tepid electric offerings of established carmakers such as Audi and Mercedes have only underscored the quality of their rival’s battery and powertrain technology (the same can’t be said of Tesla’s build quality). Volkswagen’s software problems with its forthcoming ID.3 electric vehicle suggest catching Tesla won’t be straightforward, even with the Germans’ vast resources.Tesla’s stratospheric valuation appears to have become self-reinforcing. Should it require more money to fund its roughly $9 billion of capital expenditure over the next three years, it can raise it from shareholders without worrying about diluting them too much.Similarly, holders of more than $4 billion of convertible bonds that Tesla issued to fund its expansion should be happy to convert them into stock, rather than demand cash repayment, taking some of the pressure off the company and its balance sheet.  Still, Tesla’s valuation remains impossible to justify by any standard metrics. Analysts’ average price target is more than 40% below the current level. Even Musk has suggested that the share price, which has almost trebled since the start of 2020, is too high — although, as with his taunting of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and his comments about “fascist” lockdowns, it’s usually better to tune out what Musk says and focus on his actions instead.  The skeptics might have more faith in Tesla’s new position as the leader of the automaker pack when Musk stops his provocations and his shareholders stop getting giddy over modest good news.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Bryant is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies. He previously worked for the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why Shares of Graf Industrial Are Soaring Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Shares of Graf Industrial Are Soaring Today

    Shares of Graf Industrial (NYSE: GRAF) gained 20% on Thursday after the special purpose acquisition company (SPAC) announced plans to merge with a maker of sensors for self-driving vehicles. The deal would move its merger partner, Velodyne Lidar, onto public markets, joining a host of other companies to use SPACs to go public in recent months. Velodyne Lidar said Thursday it would combine with Graf Industrial to create a company with a pro forma market capitalization of $1.8 billion.

  • Disney Finds New Avenue for Revenue in Partnership With Ford
    Motley Fool

    Disney Finds New Avenue for Revenue in Partnership With Ford

    Entertainment giant Walt Disney (NYSE: DIS) has been suffering for the past few months while its parks and experiences were closed, and only a few have recently reopened. Its main revenue driver during the COVID-19 pandemic has been its streaming services, and it's been finding innovative ways to make them more profitable, such as releasing new films straight to streaming. A new partnership with the Ford Motor Company (NYSE: F) is another path to bringing in much-needed cash.

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