FB - Facebook, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real-time price. Currency in USD
198.36
-2.42 (-1.21%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

199.00 +0.64 (0.32%)
Pre-market: 5:46AM EDT

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Previous close200.78
Open202.18
Bid0.00 x 800
Ask199.28 x 1300
Day's range198.13 - 202.33
52-week range123.02 - 218.62
Volume12,098,262
Avg. volume17,241,684
Market cap566.217B
Beta (3Y monthly)1.30
PE ratio (TTM)29.44
EPS (TTM)6.74
Earnings date24 Jul 2019
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target est222.97
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Facebook Untrustworthy, Libra 'Never Going to Happen': Gerber
    Bloomberg3 days ago

    Facebook Untrustworthy, Libra 'Never Going to Happen': Gerber

    Jul.19 -- Ross Gerber, chief executive officer of Gerber Kawasaki Wealth and Investment Management, and Bloomberg Opinion's Shira Ovide, discuss Facebook Inc.'s plans for a new cryptocurrency on "Bloomberg Technology." Ovide's opinions are her own.

  • Earnings extravaganza, Q2 GDP — What to know in the week ahead
    Yahoo Finance16 hours ago

    Earnings extravaganza, Q2 GDP — What to know in the week ahead

    This week, the focus will be on earnings and second-quarter GDP data to be released at the end of the week.

  • Motley Fool14 hours ago

    5 Earnings Reports to Watch

    Earningspalooza is heating up -- here’s what to watch with five big companies reporting next week.

  • Stories Could Save Core Facebook Engagement
    Motley Fool16 hours ago

    Stories Could Save Core Facebook Engagement

    Stories usage increased 9% sequentially last quarter.

  • Facebook Earnings: What to Watch
    Motley Fool19 hours ago

    Facebook Earnings: What to Watch

    These three metrics will give investors a glimpse into the social network's recent performance.

  • Can Facebook Get Past the Antitrust Debacle When It Reports Earnings?
    Motley Fool2 days ago

    Can Facebook Get Past the Antitrust Debacle When It Reports Earnings?

    After recent reports of a record-setting fine, it needs to put its history of consumer privacy issues behind it.

  • CNBC2 days ago

    Libra hearings may give bitcoin 'much-needed political momentum': CoinShares strategy chief

    CoinShares Chief Strategy Officer Meltem Demirors discusses Facebook's Libra project and its impact on the cryptocurrency market after testifying to the House Financial Services Committee on Capitol Hill.

  • Meet Morgan Beller, the 26-year-old woman behind Facebook's plan to make its own currency
    CNBC2 days ago

    Meet Morgan Beller, the 26-year-old woman behind Facebook's plan to make its own currency

    Facebook Vice President David Marcus is the face of the company's Libra digital currency, but the original driving force was a 26-year-old female corporate-development employee, Morgan Beller.

  • Bloomberg2 days ago

    `Bodyguard' Can't Save European TV from Netflix

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- In Europe, people are used to watching their TV for free. Or sort of. In much of the region – France, Germany, the U.K. – there’s a license fee: anyone with a TV set has to pay an annual fee of $100 to $200 for the privilege. The levies help to fund public-service broadcasters like the BBC and ARD.The problem is that broadcasters are hemorrhaging viewers to streaming platforms like Netflix Inc. or Amazon.com Inc.’s Prime video service. And for TV stations whose biggest revenue stream is advertising, fewer viewers mean fewer ad dollars, compounding the flight to digital ad platforms like Facebook Inc. and Google.In response, broadcasters want to create their own Netflix rivals to buttress themselves against the tech firms’ incursions. The streaming video giants’ advantage is their scale: They can justify the investment in major new productions because they can reach large global audiences. That, in theory, helps them charge higher prices, since they have better content and more of it.That’s harder when you’re a local European player, which is why commercial and public-funded broadcasters are trying to join forces. But they’re also butting up against regulators who are wary of giving too much power to one organization, or of consumers losing access to content for which they’ve theoretically already paid through a licence fee.On Friday, it was the U.K.’s turn. ITV Plc, the maker of the Golden Globe-nominated series Bodyguard, and the publicly owned British Broadcasting Corp. announced they were teaming up to offer Britbox in their home market. (A version of it already has 500,000 subscribers in the U.S.)It’s easy to find the problems with the service. For 5.99 pounds ($7.50) a month, customers will get a handful of new shows as well as access to both broadcasters’ back catalogs. For ITV, that means programs that have been on its existing video-on-demand platform for at least a month, and, for the BBC, a year. This could be a tough sell to domestic viewers who will have already had the chance to view them for free. That the regulator, Ofcom, was so quick to approve the arrangement suggests that the two have hardly created a new titan.In the circumstances, ITV Chief Executive Officer Carolyn McCall deserves some credit for getting the project across the line at all. It was an uphill struggle to get this far, with the BBC reportedly reluctant to share its treasure trove of content. It should now become easier to find further broadcast and distribution partners: Viacom Inc.’s Channel 5 or BT Group Plc are obvious potential candidates.French broadcasters are having similar issues. France Televisions, M6-Metropole Television SA and Television Francaise 1’s joint offering, Salto, has been struggling to secure regulatory clearance. It’s had to make 20 undertakings, including that it will get no more than 40% of content under exclusivity from its parent firms, according to a report this week in newspaper Les Echos.The European players may be following the lead of their American peers in steadily pulling more shows from Netflix in order to run them on their own rival platforms. But to reach the scale they need in order to compete, they are also encountering regulatory difficulties that the likes of Comcast Corp., AT&T Inc.’s WarnerMedia and Walt Disney Co. don’t face.Life is going to get tougher for Netflix and Amazon in Europe, for sure. But as long as the publicly-funded titans zealously guard their content and regulators remain reluctant to bless closer alliances, the region’s traditional commercial broadcasters are going to find it far harder to beef up and steal subscribers than their counterparts in the U.S.To contact the author of this story: Alex Webb at awebb25@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Edward Evans at eevans3@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Alex Webb is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Europe's technology, media and communications industries. He previously covered Apple and other technology companies for Bloomberg News in San Francisco.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Facebook (FB) to Report Q2 Earnings: What's in the Cards?
    Zacks3 days ago

    Facebook (FB) to Report Q2 Earnings: What's in the Cards?

    Facebook's (FB) second-quarter 2019 results are likely to gain from continued subscriber growth, driven by rapid adoption of Stories and Watch despite numerous controversies.

  • 3 Takeaways from Q2 Earnings Results Thus Far
    Zacks3 days ago

    3 Takeaways from Q2 Earnings Results Thus Far

    3 Takeaways from Q2 Earnings Results Thus Far

  • Is Microsoft a Buy After Solid Q4 Earnings?
    Zacks3 days ago

    Is Microsoft a Buy After Solid Q4 Earnings?

    Microsoft is set for new heights after a stellar quarter.

  • Snap's advertising platform saw a spike in interest in Q2
    Yahoo Finance3 days ago

    Snap's advertising platform saw a spike in interest in Q2

    Snap Inc. reports earnings on July 23 and new numbers from web analytics firm Similarweb show something to encourage investors.

  • Market Realist3 days ago

    Comcast Shares Pop on Goldman’s Optimism

    Comcast (CMCSA) shares popped after Goldman Sachs issued a positive note on the company recently. Goldman upgraded its rating for Comcast to "buy" from "hold."

  • Should Facebook Drop Libra and Buy Square?
    Motley Fool3 days ago

    Should Facebook Drop Libra and Buy Square?

    Would buying Square help Facebook fulfill its digital payment goals without tripping regulatory alarms?

  • Market Realist3 days ago

    Slack Stock Posted Biggest Daily Loss Yet: What’s Next?

    After making headlines with its astonishing public debut without the help of bankers, Slack (WORK) seems to have lost steam in July.

  • Market Realist3 days ago

    US Stock Markets Are Strong, Larry Fink Is Optimistic

    US stock markets made an all-time high earlier this week. BlackRock CEO Larry Fink expects the markets to move even higher.

  • Motley Fool3 days ago

    Ask a Fool: How Is Facebook's Libra Cryptocurrency Different From Bitcoin?

    There are two big differentiating factors to be aware of.

  • Investing.com3 days ago

    Bitcoin Above 10K, but Can't Avoid Weekly Slide

    Investing.com -- Bitcoin fell slightly Friday and remained on track for a weekly loss with little positive catalysts to prompt buying.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Spotify, Slack, Google, Facebook and Apple
    Zacks3 days ago

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Spotify, Slack, Google, Facebook and Apple

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Spotify, Slack, Google, Facebook and Apple

  • Israeli security company reportedly has tool that spies on Apple, Google and Facebook cloud data
    CNBC3 days ago

    Israeli security company reportedly has tool that spies on Apple, Google and Facebook cloud data

    An Israeli cybersecurity company has reportedly developed spyware that can scrape data from the servers of Apple, Google, Facebook, Amazon and Microsoft products.

  • TE Connectivity (TEL) to Post Q3 Earnings: What's in Store?
    Zacks3 days ago

    TE Connectivity (TEL) to Post Q3 Earnings: What's in Store?

    TE Connectivity's (TEL) industrial and communications solutions portfolio is likely to aid fiscal Q3 results. Yet, weak market conditions in China & softness in European Auto may mar top-line growth.

  • Market Realist3 days ago

    Trump Calls for Revisit of JEDI Contract amid Complaints

    On Thursday, in response to a question about the JEDI contract, President Trump said he'd been hearing complaints.

  • FaceApp Might Have Your Picture. Facebook and Google Have a Lot More
    Bloomberg3 days ago

    FaceApp Might Have Your Picture. Facebook and Google Have a Lot More

    (Bloomberg) -- Sure, I like privacy in the abstract. But I’m applying for an apartment in New York City, and I just sent out my only slightly redacted W-2, credit history and screenshots of my bank account to several people just because they said they’re real estate brokers.So I cannot judge the thousands of Americans who sent in a picture of themselves to a Russian-made smartphone application that they hadn’t heard of the day before. FaceApp is a viral app that allows people to create startlingly realistic images of themselves as seniors or as children. And this week, it incited a panic as reports emerged that people using the app were sending their images to a little-known Russian company for doctoring.The scandal is not surprising. Whether it’s a hip thing like FaceApp (literally all it does is age you)—or the age-old torture of applying for an urban apartment—it doesn’t take much to get any of us to hand over our data.I have no idea whether people should be wary of FaceApp in particular. Security researchers have found no evidence that it sucks up all your photos or does anything similarly nefarious. The company said it deletes most images within 48 hours and that it will remove user data upon request.The fact that it’s Russian isn’t enough to discredit it. But Democratic Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer has called for an FBI investigation. And if we were living in a movie, the all-powerful facial recognition machine that brings humanity to its knees would certainly be built on the back of viral human vanity.It’s interesting to look at the FaceApp panic in the context of the broader privacy conversation around Silicon Valley’s tech giants. At Facebook Inc., the company has argued that its size is part of the reason it’s able to safeguard user data better than smaller, less controllable competitors. And compared to any random app, I’m sure Facebook is fairly responsible. (Listen to this podcast for a compelling argument that the whole Cambridge Analytica scandal might have been kind of overblown.)Facebook’s opponents argue that by breaking it up, its various pieces and their competitors would be forced to compete by offering superior privacy protections. But with so many people so willing to trade their data for convenience (or a discount, or an apartment, or a face filter), the invisible hand of the market probably won’t protect us from tech overreach.The most obvious answer is privacy regulation. This is why we elect leaders to create a regulatory state to watch out for us. I’m not particularly interested in investigating the factory farm that pumps out the eggs that I buy. That’s why I rely on the Food and Drug Administration to keep an eye on things.But in the absence of strong government oversight in the internet world, we’ve had to rely on app stores and other log-in tools to protect us. That has some mixed results. And it means the gatekeepers—Apple Inc., Google and Facebook, in particular—know a ton about us.I’m sure some privacy-minded people will object to this sort of defeatism. Yes, people can take some responsibility for their privacy. As in, maybe do some background googling before downloading an app from a company that you’ve never heard of? But more likely, people will just embrace the post-privacy dystopia. If regulators won’t police the most obvious targets, Apple, Google and Facebook (which has even called for regulations!), I guess the Russians can enjoy looking at our smiling, naïve faces.This article also ran in Bloomberg Technology’s Fully Charged newsletter. Sign up here.And here’s what you need to know in global technology newsWeWork's CEO reaps cash riches without IPO. Adam Neumann has sold $700 million through sales and loans, the Wall Street Journal reports.Trade wars aren't all bad. The markets seem to think that South Korean chipmakers stand to benefit.Grindr struggles under new management. The president of the gay dating app once said "holy matrimony" should be between a man and a woman. BuzzFeed dug into the company's challenges.Worried about making enough money? Getting that dream job? Take a moment to try the Bloomberg Work Wise career calculator and learn how your salary stacks up, and how much your dream job might pay.To contact the author of this story: Eric Newcomer in New York at enewcomer@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Anne VanderMey at avandermey@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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