FRAS.L - Frasers Group plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
310.00
+3.40 (+1.11%)
At close: 4:38PM BST
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Previous close306.60
Open312.20
Bid309.20 x N/A
Ask310.60 x N/A
Day's range305.00 - 318.02
52-week range166.60 - 536.35
Volume883,188
Avg. volume885,369
Market cap1.61B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.77
PE ratio (TTM)12.45
EPS (TTM)24.90
Earnings date16 Jul 2020
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend date12 May 2010
1y target estN/A
  • Why quality and value are key drivers of the Frasers share price
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    Why quality and value are key drivers of the Frasers share price

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  • What to watch: Burberry donates 100,000 pieces of PPE, Sports Direct resolves tax dispute, and stocks fall
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  • Why Frasers Group plc’s (LON:FRAS) Return On Capital Employed Looks Uninspiring
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    Why Frasers Group plc’s (LON:FRAS) Return On Capital Employed Looks Uninspiring

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  • Are Sporting Goods Essential in a Pandemic?
    Bloomberg

    Are Sporting Goods Essential in a Pandemic?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- You really can’t blame Mike Ashley for trying.The billionaire founder of Frasers Group Plc tried to keep his sporting goods stores open, arguing that they provided essential supplies of fitness equipment to self-isolating Britons. The retailer has since made a U-turn, closing its Sports Direct and Evans Cycles stores on Tuesday as the U.K.’s nationwide lockdown took effect.Ashley may be everyone’s favorite pantomime villain — and his brash attempt to keep stores open prompted a backlash from politicians —  but as usual, the entrepreneur isn’t totally off point. People around the world are asking themselves exactly what they may need to stay healthy and sane as they hunker down at home to ride out the coronavirus crisis.There seems to be some logic missing in the categories that the British government has deemed essential and non-essential. Some are obvious: supermarkets and pharmacies, for example, should stay open. Clothing shops are clearly far less necessary. Many, including Next Plc, Arcadia Group Ltd.’s Topshop and Primark, the budget fashion chain owned by Associated Foods Plc, had already closed their doors.But other categories are more ambiguous. Why are bicycle shops deemed more essential than electronics and home appliance retailers? Dixons Carphone Plc was among the chains lobbying to be given essential status. The group has now shuttered stores. (Frasers closed Evans Cycles anyway while seeking more clarity from the government.)The government argues that bicycle shops are crucial to help workers get around while avoiding public transport. But surely with many Britons now forced to work from home, it’s also imperative for people to be able to buy computer and phone gear they didn’t know they really needed until now. If they’re out buying food, shouldn’t they be able to buy a cable or a printer too? And what if the washing machine breaks? Many large electronics and appliance stores are conveniently located in the same retail parks as supermarkets.True, people can order via the internet, and many sales will indeed migrate to this channel. But there is a danger that with so many online orders for essential items, delivery capacity for anything else won’t be able to keep up.And filling one’s virtual supermarket shopping cart with things like an extension cord or two, in order to collect it from their local store, risks putting more pressure on staff who are busy filling shelves with staple items and keeping up with an influx of panic-buyers.Kingfisher Plc, which owns B&Q in the U.K. and Castorama in France, has closed its U.K. DIY estate while it looks to find the best ways to still provide essential items. Its Screwfix business, which serves tradesmen, has moved to “click and collect” only. That may be a model worth trying to alleviate some of the issues created by the lockdown, as well as opening only a limited number of stores as Halfords Plc is set to do.  This could ensure much needed goods are available while discouraging shopping sprees.The debate about the right approach to take comes as retailers are facing a catastrophic loss of trade. Trying to do everything to salvage some sales is only logical. Especially as the shutdown could not have come at a worst time with quarterly rent payments due tomorrow.Of course retailers that do stay open must be conscious of protecting not only customers, by respecting social distancing best practices, but also their own staff, who need gloves and masks for example. At some point the virus will abate, and chains will want to emerge with their reputation in tact.But it’s a difficult balance to strike. And it is one that chains in the U.S. are facing as well as the virus case count increases there, although many companies, including Nike Inc., Apple Inc. and L Brands Inc.’s  Bath & Bodyworks, have already closed their stores.It’s important the government help British chains find the equilibrium they need to weather this crisis.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • A Sliding Share Price Has Us Looking At Frasers Group plc's (LON:FRAS) P/E Ratio
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    A Sliding Share Price Has Us Looking At Frasers Group plc's (LON:FRAS) P/E Ratio

    Unfortunately for some shareholders, the Frasers Group (LON:FRAS) share price has dived 35% in the last thirty days...

  • The Retail Apocalypse Isn’t Over Yet
    Bloomberg

    The Retail Apocalypse Isn’t Over Yet

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Intu Properties Plc is in an almighty pickle. The owner of the Lakeside and Trafford Centre shopping malls said on Wednesday that it had been unable to raise between 1 billion pounds ($1.3 billion) and 1.5 billion pounds of equity.That’s not surprising. Even before the outbreak of the new coronavirus, tapping shareholders looked like a long shot. Intu has 4.5 billion pounds of net debt, representing a whopping 68% of the market value of its properties. Despite the value of its estate plunging by 2 billion pounds, more pain on high streets and in malls looks likely. As my colleague Chris Bryant has argued, Intu left it far too late to raise equity.The failure leaves the company in a bind. Some of its borrowings are at a corporate level, but others are against individual properties. It has almost 1 billion pounds falling due in 2021. Intu can pay the interest on its debts, but covenants look tight. Intu said it was still within its borrowing limits right now, but there was a risk that it could breach covenants at its next test in July.Susan Munden, an analyst at Bloomberg Intelligence, estimates that a 10% fall in the value of its properties and rental income would require another 300 million pounds of liquidity. And that’s before any impact on Intu’s tenants from the Covid-19 scare. As I have noted, there is already anecdotal evidence that footfall has been hit by worries about contracting the disease in shops and malls. So far Intu said that it had not seen a meaningful drop.Options for securing this funding are limited.Intu could look to sell more assets. It has already offloaded its interest in two Spanish sites and part of a mall in Derby. It still owns 100% of the Trafford and Lakeside centers, so it could bring in partners there too.  But given the scale of the crisis, some form of debt-for-equity swap looks inevitable. The shares, which have fallen more than 90% over the past year, traded at less than 10 pence on Wednesday. At this level, they are pricing in expectations that there’s a chance of the equity being wiped out. That’s a boon for short sellers, including Crispin Odey, but a worry for long-suffering shareholders, as well as bondholders who would likely take a haircut in a radical restructuring.For all its woes, Intu has some decent assets. Some malls have adjoining land, which could be used for residential development.One wild card could be Mike Ashley, majority owner of Frasers Group Plc, formerly Sports Direct. He is no stranger to a bargain, and will have many stores in Intu malls. Frasers shareholders likely wouldn't welcome his intervention, especially after his debacle at Debenhams. But Intu investors and bondholders might. The property company certainly needs a solution and fast.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The Frasers Group (LON:FRAS) Share Price Is Up 80% And Shareholders Are Holding On
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    The Frasers Group (LON:FRAS) Share Price Is Up 80% And Shareholders Are Holding On

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  • A Rising Share Price Has Us Looking Closely At Frasers Group plc's (LON:FRAS) P/E Ratio
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    A Rising Share Price Has Us Looking Closely At Frasers Group plc's (LON:FRAS) P/E Ratio

    It's really great to see that even after a strong run, Frasers Group (LON:FRAS) shares have been powering on, with a...

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