GE - General Electric Company

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
10.79
-0.11 (-1.01%)
At close: 4:00PM EST
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Previous close10.90
Open10.89
Bid0.00 x 800
Ask0.00 x 2200
Day's range10.76 - 10.96
52-week range6.40 - 11.84
Volume45,533,333
Avg. volume52,826,332
Market cap94.235B
Beta (3Y monthly)1.14
PE ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-0.62
Earnings date29 Jan 2020
Forward dividend & yield0.04 (0.36%)
Ex-dividend date2019-09-13
1y target est10.55
  • Business Wire

    Dowty Propellers is ready for the future of propeller systems with its new production facility, repair operation and headquarters near Gloucester in Brockworth, England

    Dowty Propellers today inaugurated its new facility in Brockworth, England to provide a modern operation for the company’s development, manufacture and support of state-of-the-art propeller systems with all-composite blades. Located just outside Gloucester at Brockworth’s Gloucester Business Park, this 183,000-sq. ft. building brings together Dowty Propellers’ primary resources at one site: from the full production process for its propeller systems to the company’s administrative offices, design and engineering teams, as well as the Dowty Propellers Repair and Overhaul (DPRO) center – the U.K. arm of Dowty Propellers’ global support network.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 1-Safran CEO cautious on supply chain once Boeing grounding lifted

    The head of French jet engine maker Safran has voiced caution over the ability of aerospace supply chains to ramp up quickly after the return to service of the Boeing 737 MAX, which has been grounded for months following two fatal accidents. Safran co-produces the LEAP engine for the MAX through its CFM International joint venture with General Electric. Once the jet returns to service - the timing of which is in the hands of regulators - Boeing plans to reach a previously targeted production level of 57 aircraft a month by end-2020 from its current rate of 42, down from 52 before the grounding.

  • General Electric Falls 3%
    Investing.com

    General Electric Falls 3%

    Investing.com - General Electric (NYSE:GE) fell by 3.05% to trade at $10.82 by 09:49 (14:49 GMT) on Tuesday on the NYSE exchange.

  • Business Wire

    GE Healthcare’s New Imaging Tech and Intelligent Apps Unveiled at #RSNA19 will Deliver Hundreds of Millions in Cost Savings and Provider Productivity

    GE Healthcare today launched more than 30 new, imaging intelligent applications and smart devices designed to drive efficiency in radiology departments, aiming to double productivity and cost savings for systems by 2025. Healthcare inefficiencies lead to nearly $1 trillion of annual financial waste in the United States alone.1 Healthcare executives report costs and transparency as their number one concern moving into next year and need new solutions to help solve these challenges.2 Recognizing the opportunity to reduce waste and increase efficiency across the healthcare industry, GE Healthcare is presenting the following new intelligent applications and smart devices at the 105th annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

  • India’s Millennial Credit Card Boom Runs Into Ambani
    Bloomberg

    India’s Millennial Credit Card Boom Runs Into Ambani

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- For every 100 people in India, there are only three credit cards. A comparable penetration figure for the U.S. is 320.Statistics like these suggest that India’s first initial public offering of a credit card issuer is either an opportunity with boundless prospects — or a victim of arrested development. Which is it?The upcoming sale of shares in SBI Cards and Payment Services Ltd. will give investors a chance to find out. Between them, the controlling shareholder, State Bank of India, and its 26% partner, Carlyle Group, plan to sell up to 130.5 million shares. Throw in a simultaneous offer of new shares, and it could be a 96 billion rupee ($1.3 billion) IPO, India’s biggest in the current financial year, according to local media reports.   Business is booming at the country’s second-largest card issuer. After Carlyle arrived in 2017 to replace GE Capital in the two-decade-old venture, earnings were 7.4 rupees a share in the year through March 2018. The most recent six-monthly profit topped that figure. Younger millennials and Generation Z — those born after 2000 — are driving this growth. In India’s fiscal year ended in March 2016, barely 2% of credit card transactions were originated by people below 25 years of age. That number has jumped to 10%. Add the 26-30 age group, and the youth share of plastic is 35%, beating people over 40 by as much as eight percentage points. Yet only about 5% of Indians’ consumption per capita takes place through credit cards. After growing 12% annually over four years, average spending per card is stalling. While a slowdown is only to be expected given a sharp decline in economic momentum, the reason has more to do with the merchant than the spender.E-commerce, which is increasingly the most obvious use of a credit card, will account for barely 7% of India’s $1.2 trillion-a-year retail industry by 2021, according to Deloitte Consulting. Another 18% will go to malls, department stores and other forms of organized retail. But three-quarters of the market will remain with mom-and-pop stores. An average shop can hope to receive $775 in monthly business from cardholders. Card issuers would garner revenue of $11 of that, but the bank that acquired the merchant and fitted it up would receive just $1.50 a month. It’s simply not worth anyone’s while to expand the business into smaller towns dominated by small shops. Increasingly ubiquitous smartphones are far more suitable for payment authentication in a low-middle-income country than credit cards. Google Pay and Walmart’s PhonePe are leading people-to-people mobile payments in India, using the so-called unified payments interface, a system linking India’s banks. The same system will also drive people-to-merchant payments. Credit will just be an added layer. Banks will compete for whoever can bring them a lot of customers. India’s richest man, Mukesh Ambani, has 355 million customers for his 4G mobile network, Jio. Unsurprisingly, the oil-to-telecom tycoon wants to connect 30 million small retailers with common inventory-management, billing and tax platforms as well as low-cost payment terminals. He won’t be alone. Even in Indian e-commerce, Walmart Inc.’s Flipkart Online Services Pvt is promoting “cardless” credit, where the financing comes from banks and nonbank lenders. During the recent local holiday sale season, three out of four Amazon.com Inc. customers who availed themselves of credit to make purchases came from Tier 2 and 3 cities, where card penetration is low; every second buyer who borrowed to buy something did so for the first time.The parent State Bank’s opportunity in unsecured retail loans will be far larger than that of its IPO-bound cards unit. India’s largest commercial bank will make its low-cost deposits available to Ambani, Walmart and other digital commerce hopefuls who might be looking to sweeten their proposition to customers with a dollop of credit. That should still leave plenty of headroom for SBI Cards to grow. Its 18% market share means the company will remain a sought-after choice for co-branded partnerships, such as with Indian Railways and ride-hailing app Ola.Carlyle’s partial exit would value the U.S. buyout firm’s 26% stake at about seven times what it paid in 2017, according to Reuters. That’s a neat pile to make from plastic in such a short time, and in a country where it hasn’t really taken off. IPO investors will be content with a lot less.To contact the author of this story: Andy Mukherjee at amukherjee@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Patrick McDowell at pmcdowell10@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andy Mukherjee is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies and financial services. He previously was a columnist for Reuters Breakingviews. He has also worked for the Straits Times, ET NOW and Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Business Wire

    GE Healthcare Expands Intelligent Health Ecosystem with Launch of Edison Developer Program to Ease AI Adoption for Providers

    GE Healthcare today launched the Edison Developer Program to accelerate the adoption and impact of intelligent applications and developer services across health systems. The program is based on Edison, GE Healthcare’s secure intelligence platform, and helps healthcare providers gain easier access to market-ready algorithms and applications by directly integrating these technologies into existing workflows.

  • GE's New CFO Lacks 'Wow' Factor and That's Fine
    Bloomberg

    GE's New CFO Lacks 'Wow' Factor and That's Fine

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- General Electric Co.’s choice for its next chief financial officer lacks a “wow” factor but checks the right boxes.  The industrial giant announced on Monday that it had hired Carolina Dybeck Happe – currently the CFO at Copenhagen-based shipping company A.P. Moller-Maersk A/S – to help CEO Larry Culp carry out a turnaround that’s finally starting to yield some results. Jamie Miller announced her intention to step down as GE’s CFO in July, and the company’s been looking for a replacement ever since. Miller will officially hand over the reins to Dybeck Happe in early 2020.Dybeck Happe previously spent more than 15 years at Stockholm-based lock maker Assa Abloy AB, but she has little name recognition in the U.S. Certainly, this isn’t the kind of blockbuster hire that some investors had been hoping to see. Many had their eye on Daniel Comas, Culp’s previous right-hand man at Danaher Corp.  A hire like that would have gotten more reaction out of the stock. Instead, shares of GE traded up about 1% Monday amid a broader rally. Still, amid ongoing investigations by the Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission into GE’s accounting practices, the value of simply announcing a hire and putting this matter to bed shouldn’t be discounted. And frankly, there is enough of a cult of personality already baked in to the current price. Most investors would tell you the stock could easily be 50% lower if it weren’t for Culp and the reputation for operational excellency he earned in his Danaher years.Culp has managed to so far avoid fresh nasty surprises in the long-term care insurance business and elsewhere at GE Capital, while the troubled power business no longer appears to be in free fall. There’s still a long way to go in this turnaround story, though. Remaining headaches for GE include a competitive market for what little demand remains for gas turbines in a world increasingly turning to renewable energy; the impact from divestitures; a fierce debate about the sustainability of its aviation unit’s free cash flow; and a continuing need to restructure, particularly in Europe where cost-cutting discussions can be notoriously difficult. Culp needs someone to help him execute on further operational changes, of course. He also could use the perspective of another outsider to continue to root out the cultural problems that led the company into this mess. Miller did a stint at insurance company WellPoint Inc., but she’s been with GE since 2008 and was likely too much of an insider to execute the kind of overhaul the company really needs. This includes finally breaking with its tendency to over-engineer its financial statements and prioritize optics over reality.There’s no reason why Dybeck Happe can’t be that person. Shares in Assa Abloy returned more than 150% to investors over the course of Dybeck Happe’s tenure as CFO there amid a spike in earnings, fueled in part by prudent cost control and in part by a steady stream of M&A. She’s only been at Moller-Maersk since January, but also sits on the board of Schneider Electric SE. Dybeck Happe’s European background could prove particularly helpful to GE on the cost-cutting dilemmas tied to its ill-fated acquisition of Alstom SA’s energy arm. And it’s nice to see a female executive replaced by another female executive for a change. Dybeck Happe was the first female CFO in Moller-Maersk’s 115-year history and was appointed there after at least one investor asked for more diversity, so her departure will be felt at the male-heavy company. Moller-Maersk’s loss may just be GE’s gain.To contact the author of this story: Brooke Sutherland at bsutherland7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brooke Sutherland is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and industrial companies. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • GE brings in shipper Maersk's CFO as finance chief
    Reuters

    GE brings in shipper Maersk's CFO as finance chief

    Carolina Dybeck Happe will start in early 2020 and replaces Jamie Miller, whose departure was announced earlier this year as new Chief Executive Officer Larry Culp seeks to simplify operations and generate cash after booking billions of dollars in losses. The company is betting on Happe's experience at Maersk, where her focus was on lowering costs, as it looks to stabilize its power business, which has long been a drag on earnings. The analysts added that while Happe does not have much experience of highly levered turnarounds, her focus while working with Culp will likely be on improving margins and cash flow.

  • GE Names Carolina Dybeck Happe As Chief Financial Officer
    Business Wire

    GE Names Carolina Dybeck Happe As Chief Financial Officer

    GE (GE) today announced that Carolina Dybeck Happe, Chief Financial Officer and Executive Vice President of A.P. Moller-Maersk, has been named Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of GE, effective in early 2020. After a rigorous global search process, I’m excited to welcome Carolina to GE. As CFO, Ms. Dybeck Happe will lead GE's global finance organization and financial activities including accounting and controllership, financial planning and analysis, tax, investor relations, internal audit, and treasury.

  • A Once-Core Business for GE and Siemens Shows New Signs of Life
    Bloomberg

    A Once-Core Business for GE and Siemens Shows New Signs of Life

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- To get Brooke Sutherland’s newsletter delivered directly to your inbox, sign up here.A once mighty engine of profit for Siemens AG and General Electric Co. isn’t dead just yet, but the business will remain a ghost of its former self. The market in question is gas turbines, equipment that sits at the heart of natural gas power plants and helps to generate electricity. A glut of capacity and the reduced cost of renewable energy tanked demand for these engines, sparking years of painful slides in profitability and massive rounds of cost-cutting. Recently, though, orders have started to perk up modestly; regions such as China are converting to gas from coal or nuclear power, while elsewhere there is a growing recognition that the flexibility and reliability of turbines gives them a role to play even in a world tilting increasingly toward alternatives. In what may be a nod to this recent improvement, Siemens CEO Joe Kaeser told Bloomberg News this week that the company may keep only a 25% stake in the struggling energy unit it plans to spin off. That would constitute a more extensive break than what was envisioned when Siemens announced the overhaul in May with the intention of retaining a “somewhat less than 50%” holding — seemingly a bet that the apparent bottoming in demand will entice more support from the public market.Indeed, Siemens saw a 9% increase in comparable orders in its gas-and-power division in the fiscal fourth quarter and said its market share in large gas turbines held roughly steady in 2019. Deutsche Bank AG analysts led by Gael de-Bray this week outlined a path for a 20% recovery in Siemens gas turbine orders to 10 gigawatts annually. The analysts acknowledge this is an out-of-consensus view, but even GE, the poster child for gas power woes, has seen business come in better than expected. Year to date, GE logged gas power orders of 12.8 GWs, compared with 7.2 GWs in the same period in 2018, Chief Financial Officer Jamie Miller said on the company’s third-quarter earnings call. That adds support to CEO Larry Culp’s optimism that overall market volume may exceed GE’s dire forecast of just 25 to 30 GWs at the beginning of the year. This recent stabilization in demand is encouraging, but the question isn’t just whether companies can attract orders, but whether they can deliver them and any associated maintenance work profitably. The Deutsche Bank analysts estimate the Siemens Energy spinoff (which includes a 59% stake in Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy SA) can reach its goal of doubling its adjusted profit margin to about 8% by 2021, a reflection of growth in more profitable service work and targeted cost savings of 700 million euros. Progress is progress, but it should be noted that an 8% margin isn’t exactly blockbuster profitability, and that number reinforces the idea that there is a more structural shift in the power market that will keep a lid on further improvements.GE, for its part, has said fixed costs are down 9% year to date in the gas power business, although it has also pushed out some restructuring work, in part because negotiations in Europe are taking longer than expected. Its own gas-power service revenue has declined in the past three quarters. Even so, Melius Research analyst Scott Davis has argued there’s no structural reason that margins can’t return to the mid-teen levels of yesteryear. He bases this in part on the idea that Siemens, as its top competitor, cares deeply about boosting its own margins and that will help keep pricing rational. In response to that, I would point you to the other power market news making the headlines this week: Mitsubishi Heavy Industries CEO Seiji Izumisawa is leaving the door open to a combination or collaboration with Siemens’s power business once it’s carved out. Siemens had reportedly been in talks to merge the gas-turbine business with Mitsubishi before deciding to go ahead with the spinoff instead.(1) “We do have a good relationship with Siemens,” Izumisawa said in an interview at Bloomberg Headquarters this week. “I will not deny the possibility that we could possibly work with them.”Such a move would substantially shift the competitive landscape, and it’s far from clear that Mitsubishi would have the same discipline if it was in charge of the pricing for Siemens’s new units and service agreements. Asked whether market share or profitability was more important amid weak demand for turbines, Izumisawa said that the most important thing was for the business to make money and generate value for shareholders, but within that, there’s an understanding that after-market services are responsible for most of the profit in the gas turbine business. That gives the company an interest in making sure it’s delivering a consistent number of units, he said. While Izumisawa said the Siemens spinoff doesn’t directly affect Mitsubishi’s business strategy, he acknowledged competition is only getting tougher. Siemens’s Kaeser has spoken about the likelihood that China will want its own national champion to capitalize on an expected boom in gas power demand as the country converts from coal. To that end, Izumisawa touted the productivity and reliability benefits offered by Mitsubishi’s high-efficiency J-series turbines as a tool for luring customers. The company’s estimate of greater than 64% efficiency for that product exceeds the 62.2% for GE’s 9HA turbine, and Mitsubishi is working to further expand that lead with its next generation turbine, Gordon Haskett analyst John Inch wrote in a June report. Here I will remind you that GE has cut R&D at its power unit substantially over the past few years. Point being, demand may be stabilizing, but the market is only getting more competitive. LEAKING FUELSome worrying signals for the aerospace market emanated from the Dubai Air Show this week. Emirates trimmed order commitments for both Boeing Co. and Airbus SE jets, with the reductions adding up to $24 billion at list prices. Big aircraft like Boeing’s 777X are falling out of favor as weakening demand and fare competition sparks concern about airlines’ ability to fill the planes profitably. Emirates will take 126 777X jets, including six orders for older models that were upgraded to the newest version, and 30 of Boeing’s smaller 787 Dreamliners. All in, that’s 40 fewer planes than planned. The airline upped its order for Airbus’s A350 wide-body jet, but seemingly scrapped a commitment for 40 A330neos that was part of the original deal, resulting in a net loss.A bright spot was Airbus’s longer-range A321 XLR model. Boeing’s counter to that, a potential new middle-market aircraft, remains a question mark amid the continuing crisis engulfing its 737 Max. The more orders Airbus is able to rack up in the meantime, the weaker the business case for that Boeing jet. Airbus is already moving on: The manufacturer talked about developing a narrow-body jet by the end of the 2020s if key technologies are available, likely kicking off a new front in the arms race with Boeing, notes Bloomberg Intelligence’s George Ferguson. The MCAS software system blamed for the Max’s two fatal crashes was installed to make up for the fact that the existing 737 model infrastructure was less adaptable to more fuel-efficient engines. Clean-sheet development programs like the one Airbus is contemplating won’t come cheap and the fact that the planemakers’ are considering them speaks to a potentially more structural shift away from wide-bodies in the current demand environment. DEALS, ACTIVISTS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Thyssenkrupp AG’s plan to sell off its prized elevator division got more complicated this week. The company plunged the most since 2000 on Thursday after warning that a deepening cash crunch would force it to suspend dividend payments. Selling off the entire elevator business – whose exposure to the growing urbanization trend makes it a rare bright spot for Thyssenkrupp – would bring in much needed cash to fund restructuring for the remaining steel, submarines and industrial businesses. But that would also deprive Thyssenkrupp of its top source of cash flow should the turnaround plan fail to gain traction. Binding bids for the elevator unit are due in mid-January, people familiar with the matter told Bloomberg News. Rival Kone Oyj has partnered with private equity firm CVC Capital Partners for a bid and has reportedly offered a sizable breakup fee to help convince Thyssenkrupp to put aside antitrust concerns. Also in the running are a consortium of Blackstone Group Inc., Carlyle Group LP and Canada Pension Plan Investment Board; an Advent International, Cinven and Abu Dhabi Investment Authority team; Brookfield Asset Management; Asian private equity firm Hillhouse Capital, whose connection to China may also draw scrutiny; and 3G Capital, which is better known for its troubled food investments.Cobham Plc’s planned sale to Advent International advanced a step this week after the U.K. government said it was likely to accept remedies designed to address national security concerns over the $5 billion takeover of a military supplier. The deal still risks being caught in the political crossfire with a final ruling not expected to come until Dec. 17, five days after the U.K. general election. The opposition Labour Party has taken a dim view of the deal amid a spike in foreign acquirers taking advantage of the pound’s Brexit-fueled weakness. The deal has few benefits for Britain, but a block on purely protectionist grounds would set a bad precedent, as my colleague Chris Hughes has written. “If the U.K. merely rues that Cobham is worth more in U.S. hands, it should instead ask whether past industrial policy is to blame and learn the lessons,” Chris writes. Approval likely comes with some strings, though, including job commitments and potentially an agreement to keep Cobham’s headquarters in the U.K.BONUS READINGAmazon Has Become America’s CEO Factory The Inglorious End of the Airline Mile as a Unique Travel Reward Conoco's 2020s Plan Is to Embrace the FUD: Liam Denning Amtrak CEO Has a Plan for Profitability, and You Won’t Like It General Motors Declares Corporate War on Fiat: Chris Bryant Major TARP Survivor Sees Warning in Exuberant Florida Developers(1) That was likely a reflection of an unwillingness by Kaeser (who’s due to retire in 2021) to risk having another bruising fight with European antitrust regulators slow down his plans for a boosted valuation.To contact the author of this story: Brooke Sutherland at bsutherland7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brooke Sutherland is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and industrial companies. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 1-Emirates' Clark says Rolls-Royce needs to sort itself out after engine delays

    The board of Rolls-Royce must urgently address its engine performance problems, the head of Dubai's Emirates said, as the world's largest buyer of wide-body jets weighs up who will power its order of Boeing 787 jets. Emirates agreed to buy its first 787 Dreamliners in a last-minute, $9 billion deal at the Dubai Airshow on Wednesday, without specifying what engine would power it, while reducing its order for the U.S. planemaker's delayed 777X model. The 787s, which can take either Rolls or rival GE Aviation's GEnx engines, will be delivered to Emirates in 2023, a year later than a tentative purchase plan outlined two years ago.

  • GE Rises to 2019 High, Extending Gain After 75% Collapse
    Bloomberg

    GE Rises to 2019 High, Extending Gain After 75% Collapse

    (Bloomberg) -- General Electric Co. rallied mid-afternoon Thursday to touch the highest level in more than a year despite a mixed tape for the broader market.The stunning rebound in GE means it’s risen 45% since the bombshell allegations of accounting fraud against the company in mid-August from prominent financial examiner Harry Markopolos. The turn in investor sentiment was bolstered by GE’s third-quarter results when GE raised its cash-flow forecast for 2019 in the face of both tariff headwinds and pressures on the jet-engine business caused by the grounding of Boeing Co.’s 737 Max.The Boston-based company was among the top performers in the S&P 500 Index, which remains on track to extend its worst three-day stretch since early Oct. Thursday’s 2% rise for GE continues its comeback from a decade low last December. The conglomerate’s now worth about $101 billion -- still a far cry from a 2000 peak of almost $600 billion.GE collapsed 76% in the two calendar years 2017-2018, falling to a little more than $7 from more than $30.To contact the reporters on this story: Esha Dey in New York at edey@bloomberg.net;Bailey Lipschultz in New York at blipschultz@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Catherine Larkin at clarkin4@bloomberg.net, Scott SchnipperFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 4-Sales of grounded Boeing 737 MAX gather pace at Dubai Airshow

    Boeing Co won fresh support for its grounded 737 MAX at the Dubai Airshow on Tuesday as airlines laid out plans to buy up to 50 of the jets worth $6 billion at list prices, a day after securing the first firm order since a safety ban in March. Kazakhstan flag carrier Air Astana said it had signed a letter of intent to order 30 Boeing 737 MAX 8 jets for its recently launched FlyArystan low-cost subsidiary. Such draft deals can take time to turn into final contracts but the signing gave embattled Boeing a public boost as it faces concerns over increased regulatory scrutiny following two fatal accidents that led to the eight-month-old grounding.

  • 14 High Dividend Stocks You Can Count On
    Investor's Business Daily

    14 High Dividend Stocks You Can Count On

    High-dividend stocks can be misleading. Here's a smart way to find stable stocks with high dividends. Watch these 14 dividend payers on IBD's radar.

  • Acquired Assets Aid Danaher (DHR) Despite Rise in Costs
    Zacks

    Acquired Assets Aid Danaher (DHR) Despite Rise in Costs

    Danaher's (DHR) acquisitive nature has been driving its top line. High product demand and shareholder-friendly policies are added positives. However, high costs, forex woes and debts are concerning.

  • General Electric Secures Wind Turbine Deal From Innergex
    Zacks

    General Electric Secures Wind Turbine Deal From Innergex

    General Electric's (GE) advanced 2.X-127 onshore wind turbines help its customers to reduce cost of energy with low and medium wind speed sites.

  • Simple Market Timing Strategies That Work - November 19, 2019
    Zacks

    Simple Market Timing Strategies That Work - November 19, 2019

    Have you ever dreamed of being that one in a million investor who has the talent to perfectly time the markets?

  • Airplanes Aren’t Selling Like They Used To
    Bloomberg

    Airplanes Aren’t Selling Like They Used To

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Airplanes just aren’t selling like they used to.Monday marked the second day of the Dubai Air Show, and while there was the usual smattering of headlines with big-dollar figures, there was also fresh evidence that the robust aerospace cycle that’s propelled the industry’s stocks to new highs is getting long in the tooth. Carriers including Emirates and Etihad Airways rejiggered orders at the Air Show as they sought to adapt to a global growth slowdown and weaker demand for travel in the Middle East amid stubbornly low oil prices. This follows similar rethinks at British Airways-parent IAG SA and Deutsche Lufthansa AG earlier this month, with both carriers seemingly pushing out or putting on hold orders for Boeing Co.’s 777X wide-body model. The general takeaway is that the world doesn’t need as many planes right now as airlines might have thought just a few years ago, especially when it comes to the biggest jets used for long-distance international flights. The 777X in particular appears to be in trouble, with launch customer Emirates also reportedly contemplating cutting or delaying its order for 150 of the jets, perhaps in part by swapping in some of the smaller 787 Dreamliners. The Middle East is one of the more attractive markets for the 777 model, which is too big to fly in many other regions. So if airlines there are balking, then production rates may need to come down. Complicating things is a delay in the first deliveries of the 777X until 2021 due to durability issues with a General Electric Co. jet engine. Emirates chief Tim Clark has made it clear he’s fed up with a pattern of delayed rollouts, or worse, post-delivery glitches that force costly groundings, and the delay could factor into any decision. Stanley Deal, who took over as head of Boeing’s commercial airplanes division in October following the ouster of Kevin McAllister, told reporters over the weekend that the company was still in talks with Emirates on the 777X and a still yet-to-be-confirmed order for 40 Dreamliners. “Long term, the 777X’s value remains intact,” Deal said.Boeing has also trimmed its production targets for the Dreamliner after expected orders from China failed to materialize. Etihad Airways said at the Dubai Air Show that it will take 20 fewer Dreamliners over the next four years than originally planned as it grapples with eye-popping losses. Airbus SE models weren’t spared from weakening demand, either. Emirates finalized a $16 billion order for 50 Airbus A350 widebody jets — more than it had committed to in February — but appears to have backed away from an earlier commitment to buy 40 A330neos as well, meaning the total value of the deal before customary discounts is less than originally outlined.The news was better in the narrow-body market. Air Arabia inked a firm order for 120 of Airbus’s A320-model jets. Even Boeing’s troubled 737 Max got some love, with Turkish holiday carrier SunExpress exercising an option to add 10 more of the jets to its fleet. Indian low-cost carrier SpiceJet Ltd. may also seize on the dearth of Max orders as an opportunity to pick up some of the jets at a discount as it contemplates a new hub in the Middle East. In an interview with Bloomberg TV, SpiceJet chairman Ajay Singh wouldn’t rule out signing a deal at the air show, although the size and ultimate timing remain up in the air. Even so, the early returns on the Air Show would seem to be at odds with Airbus CEO Guillaume Faury’s  comments last week that aviation demand continues to move “up and up.” Global passenger traffic is indeed still growing, but at a much lower rate than over the past few years. And that matters, because aviation stocks aren’t cheap right now. The SPDR S&P Aerospace and Defense ETF is up 42% so far this year, well outpacing the broader S&P 500 benchmark. The high valuations for aerospace stocks can hold to the extent margins are still on an uptrend and the rebound investors are positioning for in the manufacturing industry plays out, Denise Chisholm, Fidelity’s head of sector strategy, said in a Bloomberg TV interview. At least some airlines, though, are choosing to plan more conservatively.To contact the author of this story: Brooke Sutherland at bsutherland7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brooke Sutherland is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and industrial companies. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: General Electric, Siemens Aktiengesellschaft, Intuitive Surgical, Honeywell International and SAP
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: General Electric, Siemens Aktiengesellschaft, Intuitive Surgical, Honeywell International and SAP

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: General Electric, Siemens Aktiengesellschaft, Intuitive Surgical, Honeywell International and SAP

  • Business Wire

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  • Smart Factory Revolution Puts 4 Stocks in Focus
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    PREVIEW -Jet grounding and delays overshadow Dubai Airshow

    An eight-month crisis over the grounding of Boeing's 737 MAX jets and widespread industrial delays are setting an unpredictable backdrop to next week's Dubai Airshow, with some airlines reviewing fleet plans even as others look for bargains. Top of their agenda will be the worldwide grounding of the 737 MAX in the wake of two deadly crashes. Investors who have pushed up Boeing shares believe the planemaker is turning a corner after the eight month grounding, with the company predicting commercial flights in January.

  • Bloomberg

    Tinder for Utilities Matches Power Buyers and Sellers

    (Bloomberg) -- It can be hard for a company to find that special wind or solar farm that ticks all the right boxes.As businesses and governments set targets to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, contracts to buy power directly from renewable energy producers are becoming more popular than ever. Last year a record $1.4 billion of contracts were signed in Europe, according to an estimate from renewable energy company Pexapark AG.New matchmaking programs likened to the iconic app built by Tinder LLC aim to eliminate the costs of looking for the right supplier. It opens new possibilities for smaller companies that don’t have the resources to employ whole procurement teams.This has been a banner year for clean these power purchase agreements. Companies already have signed contracts to buy a record 15.5 gigawatts of clean energy, 14% more than in all of last year, according to research from BloombergNEF. But the vast majority of those deals have been in the U.S., where the biggest technology companies have built data centers hungry for more electricity.“If you’re a small company, it’s difficult to know where to start,” said Helen Dewhurst, an analyst at BloombergNEF. “What the platforms do is allow smaller companies to look for projects that match their demand in a cheaper way, but also saves time.”On the Instatrust platform from Norwegian risk assessment and quality assurance company DNV GL Group, renewable energy developers and companies create profiles with projects or energy needs. An interactive map displays the various projects, with more information available at the click of a mouse. The potential buyer can see features such as the size of the project, credit rating and when the development is set to be complete.An upcoming feature will automate the process. Rather than have to look for the right purchaser or provider, an algorithm will make the connection between buyers and sellers.“If you get a match, you’ll get a notification,” Caroline Brun Ellefsen, global head of Instatrust, said in an interview. “It is a bit like Tinder.”Starting next year, DNV GL will have more competition from General Electric Co.’s renewables unit and Swiss utility Axpo Holding AG. A new platform known as The Green Accelerator will launch in Spain and Sweden early next year before being rolled out in other European markets, said Uli Suedhoff, director of business development for GE Renewable Energy in Europe, the Middle East and Africa.The Green Accelerator doesn’t display all the available projects like Instatrust does. Instead it takes in all the suppliers’ offers and buyers’ demands and pairs them up in a monthly auction. Once the parties are connected, the program offers a standardized contract, which helps reduce the time and cost of the transaction, Suedhoff said. Participation is free, but if the parties sign a contract, then the platform takes a fee.“We can accelerate the PPA market in Europe,” Suedhoff said. “Creating more transparency and a more efficient form for buyers and sellers to match their needs and provide as much standardization is the way to go.”So what does the future hold for these platforms?Ultimately they could capture as much as 20% of the market in Europe, Suedhoff said.To contact the reporter on this story: William Mathis in London at wmathis2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Reed Landberg at landberg@bloomberg.net, Lars Paulsson, Andrew ReiersonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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    Zacks

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    General Electric's (GE) advanced 2 MW turbines will help ENGIE North America in providing clean and renewable energy in Oklahoma and South Dakota.

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