GPS - The Gap, Inc.

NYSE - Nasdaq Real-time price. Currency in USD
17.27
+0.18 (+1.05%)
As of 11:55AM EST. Market open.
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Previous close17.09
Open17.09
Bid17.35 x 1100
Ask17.36 x 1400
Day's range16.91 - 17.40
52-week range15.11 - 31.39
Volume3,575,752
Avg. volume7,990,943
Market cap6.49B
Beta (3Y monthly)0.70
PE ratio (TTM)7.04
EPS (TTM)2.45
Earnings date21 Nov 2019
Forward dividend & yield0.97 (5.68%)
Ex-dividend date2019-10-08
1y target est17.05
  • Gap (GPS) to Report Q3 Earnings: What's in the Offing?
    Zacks

    Gap (GPS) to Report Q3 Earnings: What's in the Offing?

    Softness in Gap's (GPS) namesake brand is likely to reflect in Q3 performance. Also, the company is grappling with dismal comps and strained margins.

  • Fashion entrepreneur Rachel Zoe: This is the hardest time in fashion I’ve ever seen
    Yahoo Finance

    Fashion entrepreneur Rachel Zoe: This is the hardest time in fashion I’ve ever seen

    While Rachel Zoe has been able to successfully leverage her name into a handful of businesses, she isn’t so optimistic about the fashion industry at large.

  • Stock market news: November 8, 2019
    Yahoo Finance

    Stock market news: November 8, 2019

    Stocks ended slightly higher, shrugging off earlier losses after President Donald Trump wavered over whether tariffs would be rolled back as part of a partial deal with China.

  • Why Gap CEO Art Peck is finally out
    Yahoo Finance

    Why Gap CEO Art Peck is finally out

    Gap finally decided to make a change at the top after years of struggles under Art Peck. Here's why.

  • Gap CEO Out, Done In by Fashion Missteps and Fading Brands
    Bloomberg

    Gap CEO Out, Done In by Fashion Missteps and Fading Brands

    (Bloomberg) -- No longer the khaki king of the ’90s, Gap Inc. has been in need of an overhaul for a very long time -- and Art Peck won’t be the one to deliver it after all.Gap fired its chief executive officer late Thursday after his turnaround efforts failed to reignite sales growth, with disappointing third-quarter performance sending shares plummeting in late trading. The apparel company, which includes the namesake Gap brand, Athleta and Banana Republic, brought back a member of the founding family to lead while it figures out a longer-term plan.The shares fell as much as 5% in New York on Friday. Through Thursday’s close, they had dropped about 30% for the year so far.Peck’s termination comes after years of struggles at the company. Although the retailer made several public missteps in recent years -- like making blazers without armholes big enough for an average woman and jumping on the regrettable Normcore bandwagon -- many of its problem areas aren’t even unique in today’s difficult retail environment: relying on routine 50% discounts and maintaining a major presence in declining American malls.“It was probably the most overdue management change that we’ve seen in a while,” said Stacey Widlitz, president of SW Retail Advisors. “There comes a point and time when you can’t sit and do the same thing over and over again.”Sales SlumpAfter a brief transition, Peck will exit the president and CEO role and vacate his post on the retailer’s board. Robert Fisher, the company’s current nonexecutive chairman and son of Gap co-founders Don and Doris, will step in as president and CEO on an interim basis.The company declined to comment beyond the press release announcing Peck’s departure.The company said in a statement that companywide comparable sales appeared to be down 4% in the third quarter, which ended Nov. 2, with that measure falling 7% at its namesake brand. That’s even worse than analysts surveyed by Consensus Metrix had been expecting.“This was a challenging quarter, as macro impacts and slower traffic further pressured results that have been hampered by product and operating challenges across key brands,” Teri List-Stoll, executive vice president and chief financial officer, said in the statement announcing Peck’s exit.The company needs to find a way to sell more goods at full price and figure out a way to capture a new, younger consumer base, Dana Telsey, CEO of Telsey Advisory Group, said on Bloomberg Television.“If you don’t have the right product, you aren’t able to sell goods at full price,” Telsey said. “There’s work to be done on the core product.”Peck will be eligible for severance pay based on his termination without cause, the company said in a filing. He’ll get $2.33 million severance and a payout of stock awards worth several million dollars, filings show. He’ll also be entitled to health benefits and financial counseling for 18 months.Years of StrugglesGap, founded in 1969 in San Francisco, rose to prominence as a denim emporium selling jeans from Levi Strauss & Co., another Bay Area institution. It helped pioneer the vertical integration of retail and started producing its own branded goods. By the 1990s, it had transformed into a fashion juggernaut as it jumped on the khaki-pants trend and built up robust secondary brands in Banana Republic and Old Navy.But struggles started brewing in the middle of the next decade, from declining mall traffic to operational issues. One of the most famous missteps came in 2010 when the company unveiled a new Gap logo. Some shoppers complained, so it ditched it just a week later.To try to turn things around, it turned to new CEO Glenn Murphy in 2007, who came from a drugstore chain. He closed a slew of U.S. stores, while expanding overseas and invested in the supply chain. But the recession hit shortly after and thwarted momentum by turning a generation of shoppers onto discounters. Low-priced fast-fashion chains, like Zara and Forever 21, captured the attention of millennials, pushing Gap further out of favor. After a decade at the company in various roles, Peck replaced Murphy in early 2015 as part of a succession plan.Peck, a former consultant, tried shaking up leadership and experimenting. But sales kept declining and the business declined to the point that the company decided to spin off Old Navy, its best-performing division and the motor for the company’s sales in recent years. The company didn’t even attach an official name to its new venture when it announced the separation in February -- instead referring to it as NewCo.Old Navy, which had anchored its parent company for years, was given to Sonia Syngal to shepherd. Peck was left saddled with Banana Republic, mired in a sales slump, and the aging namesake Gap brand. He’s tried to position the Athleta chain -- a Lululemon competitor -- as the bright spot within the portfolio he would run, but it hasn’t been enough to turn things around.Holiday Season“Gap is a company that clearly needed a change. Peck wasn’t moving the needle, except moving it backwards,” said Craig Johnson, president of retail researcher firm Customer Growth Partners. “It’s still a company that has great brand equity, but its residual brand equity that needs to be updated.”What Bloomberg Intelligence Says:“Gap’s next CEO will need to find a better way to connect with younger shoppers through product, marketing and digital.”Poonam Goyal, retail analystClick here to read the research.Still, while sales have been poor, the market didn’t see his departure coming, at least so close to the critical holiday period. Peck was well established as the face of Gap. In September, he and Old Navy chief Syngal hosted an event for analysts about the planned spinoff and their vision for the companies’ future. Peck spoke at length about how Gap had to broaden its appeal, including with larger sizes and more diversity.Despite the holidays being a make-or-break time in retail, Peck’s departure might actually be a good turning point for the company, Widlitz said, adding that merchandise and products have already been decided for this season.“It leaves the door open for ‘no matter how bad December is, let’s think about the future,’” she said.(Updates with shares trading.)\--With assistance from Anders Melin.To contact the reporters on this story: Matt Townsend in New York at mtownsend9@bloomberg.net;Jordyn Holman in New York at jholman19@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Anne Riley Moffat at ariley17@bloomberg.net, Jonathan RoederFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Gap Analysts Question Planned Old Navy Spinoff After CEO Change
    Bloomberg

    Gap Analysts Question Planned Old Navy Spinoff After CEO Change

    (Bloomberg) -- Gap Inc. shares sank pre-market Friday as Wall Street questioned whether the planned spinoff of Old Navy will proceed after the company announced that Chief Executive Officer Art Peck would be stepping down and issued disappointing preliminary third-quarter results.“In our view, the timing [of Peck’s departure] is surprising in light of the pending separation of Old Navy (likely spearheaded by CEO Peck) and following the company’s recent analyst day in September which showcased the two new companies,” MKM Partner’s Roxanne Meyer wrote in a note.In addition to Peck’s departure, Gap also issued weak preliminary third-quarter results and reduced its full-year adjusted earnings-per-share forecast. Comparable store sales in the quarter fell more than expected at all three brands, including Old Navy, leading analysts to question whether a spin off would actually create the shareholder value they were hoping for. The weak preliminary results, along with Peck’s departure, led Telsey Advisory Group to downgrade the shares.Gap will hold a board meeting next week, at which the plan for Old Navy may be discussed. Analysts also expect more details on the third-quarter conference call later this month.Gap shares fell as much as 9.7% ahead of the bell. Shares were already down 30% this year through Thursday’s close. Other mall-based retailers may also slip today, with analysts cautioning that Gap’s weak quarter performance and forecast don’t bode well for its peers.Here’s more of what analysts had to say about Gap’s announcements:Telsey Advisory, Dana TelseyDowngrades to market perform from outperform, and reduces price target to $19 from $24The primary thesis to Telsey’s outperform rating had been the belief that the planned spinoff of the Old Navy business was a “potential opportunity to unlock value”Thursday’s announcements regarding the ongoing weakness at Old Navy and the CEO transition process may “extend the timeline” of a potential spinoff, while weaker results at the Old Navy business “reduce the upside potential to the value of a stand-alone entity”Jefferies, Randal Konik“With the CEO gone, that creates a vacuum of permanent leadership, and a number of questions like ‘does the spin still happen?’”The analyst believes market share loss “could be permanent” given that comparable sales results were again negative at all brands, underperforming many other retailers“Our sense is the buy-side wasn’t too enamored with Art, so him leaving could improve sentiment,” Konik wrote in a noteRates Gap buy given the low valuation, “but we need answers to these questions,” he wrote; price target $37RBC Capital Markets, Kate FitzsimonsFitzsimons believes the board may be “re-evaluating their options” given the CEO departure, she wroteMeanwhile, the updated outlook suggests EBIT margins down about 200 basis points in the third quarter and down 380-400 basis points in the fourth quarterThe updated year earnings-per-share-forecast implies that fourth-quarter EPS will be down around 50% year-over-year vs the 25% drop in the third quarter; “with all divisions landing below the Street in 3Q, the 4Q update suggests no relief into holiday, particularly out of Old Navy”Gap’s expectation for a “tougher holiday” is bad news for the rest of RBC’s mall-based coverageRates Gap shares sector perform, price target to $16 from $19Here’s What Bloomberg Intelligence Says:“Gap’s next CEO will need to find a better way to connect with younger shoppers through product, marketing and digital. The sudden appointment of interim CEO Robert J. Fisher to replace Art Peck likely comes from a failure to return the company to growth.”--Poonam Goyal, click here for noteMKM Partners, Roxanne MeyerWith Peck out of the picture, Meyer wonders if management will now reconsider the Old Navy spinoffA separation won’t create value for shareholders, given the disappointing 3Q and expected 4Q performance, and her assumption that weakness will carry into next yearShe believes the Old Navy separation plan, which was likely spearheaded by Peck, bought him more time, but the “3Q miss/revised 4Q guidance was likely the final straw”The analyst disagrees with the board’s plan to search for its “next great operator as CEO;” “in our opinion, simply put, in this late stage for GPS, an operator could be the final ax, unless the goal is to spin-off Athleta or shut the majority of stores”Rates neutral, price target $18B. Riley FBR, Susan AndersonAnderson believes the spinoff of Old Navy “could be in question,” given the CEO change and continued lackluster perform across the boardRates neutral, price target $20To contact the reporter on this story: Janet Freund in New York at jfreund11@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Catherine Larkin at clarkin4@bloomberg.net, Steven Fromm, Courtney DentchFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Gap commits to Old Navy split; CEO exit won't impact holiday shopping season
    Reuters

    Gap commits to Old Navy split; CEO exit won't impact holiday shopping season

    Gap shares fell 5.5% on Friday after Thursday's shock announcement, which came along with another weak batch of forecasts for quarterly sales and full-year earnings. The abrupt change in leadership comes just before the year's main holiday shopping season, with merchandise already ordered and stores stocking up ahead of the unofficial kickoff over the late November U.S. Thanksgiving weekend.

  • Investing.com

    Stocks - Walt Disney, Planet Fitness Rise Premarket; Gap Falls

    Investing.com - Stocks in focus in premarket trading on Friday:

  • Investing.com

    Stocks - U.S. Futures Pause on Reports of Tariff Roll-Back Uncertainty

    Investing.com - U.S. futures were flat on Friday after a record close during the prior trading session, as reports suggested that the White House’s plan to roll back tariffs on China isn’t as certain as originally thought.

  • Disney's earnings beat, Gap CEO steps down — What to know in markets Friday
    Yahoo Finance

    Disney's earnings beat, Gap CEO steps down — What to know in markets Friday

    Disney’s better-than-expected fiscal fourth quarter financial results and Gap’s c-suite shakeup will take the spotlight Friday.

  • Business Wire

    CORRECTING and REPLACING Gap Inc. Announces Art Peck to Step Down as Chief Executive Officer

    Chairman Robert J. Fisher to Serve as Interim Chief Executive Officer

  • Now the Gap Can Finally Move On
    Bloomberg

    Now the Gap Can Finally Move On

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- An overdue change is coming to Gap Inc.The retailer announced Thursday that CEO Art Peck, who has led the company (which also includes Banana Republic and Old Navy) since 2015, will step down. The company’s chairman, Robert J. Fisher, will serve as interim CEO while the board hunts for a successor.Under Peck’s tenure, the clothing retail empire never found its stride. The namesake chain has struggled with merchandising issues, from ill-fitting garments to unfashionable looks to the wrong mix of tops and bottoms in its stores. Banana Republic erred by veering too trendy instead of sticking with the sleek, classic professional attire its customer sought. Both brands have gotten stuck in a spiral of near-constant discounting, relying on “40% off” promotions to carry the business when the fashion itself wasn’t enough to get people in the door.Old Navy, which for many years was the rare bright spot of the Gap business, has recently started to sputter. It, too, has had problems with its merchandise, failing to deliver the right mix of print and patterns.The company said Thursday comparable sales were down 4% in the third quarter, a dismal showing that reflected declines at all three major brands.Plenty of other leaders have effectively taken the blame for Gap’s woes in the Peck era. Rebekka Bay, Gap’s one-time creative director, was pushed out in early 2015 after Peck was named CEO. Marissa Webb, creative director at Banana Republic, departed later that year. Andi Owen, the president of Banana Republic, departed in 2017. Jeff Kirwan, president of Gap brand, was axed in 2018 as the brand struggled with major inventory management issues. Owen and Kirwan, in particular, had been handpicked by Peck to lead a comeback.After all those senior-level castoffs, it has become abundantly clear that Peck is the one who bears responsibility for Gap’s inability to mount a turnaround. And after nearly five years, it is also clear that he did not have the answers to Gap’s problems.It was surprising that Peck did not vacate the CEO role earlier this year when the company announced its plan to split into two, with Old Navy set to become a standalone business. It seemed like a natural moment for a fresh start.Of course, whether or not Gap and Banana Republic are better off depends on who the board is able to convince to step into Peck’s shoes. But board members made the right call by seeking a leader with fresh vision.To contact the author of this story: Sarah Halzack at shalzack@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Newman at mnewman43@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Sarah Halzack is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She was previously a national retail reporter for the Washington Post.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Gap CEO exiting as forecast cut casts doubt on turnaround
    Reuters

    Gap CEO exiting as forecast cut casts doubt on turnaround

    Since taking the helm in 2015, Peck has tried to re-energize sales at the Gap brand, once a trend setter with its casual logo emblazoned hoodies and Khaki cargos, but it has recently struggled to keep pace with fast-fashion rivals such as Zara and H&M. On Thursday, the company estimated a 4% drop in third-quarter same-store sales, with declines across all its key brands including Old Navy. "Gap's whole portfolio is having a brand erosion crisis that we expect to only deepen with the current leadership vacuum," said Camilla Yanushevsky, research analyst at CFRA.

  • Morningstar

    Gap Shows CEO the Door in Wake of Awful Sales

    We view Gap as undervalued but expect to reduce our fair value estimate based on the sales trends and expected margin deterioration.

  • Pregnant Women Have No Choice But to Wear Ugly Clothes
    Bloomberg

    Pregnant Women Have No Choice But to Wear Ugly Clothes

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- When I became pregnant, I figured plenty of things were going to get harder as my belly grew bigger, such as getting a good night’s sleep or sticking to my workout routine. One thing, however, I did not anticipate: how infuriatingly difficult it would be to find a half-decent outfit.A year ago, I believed the conventional wisdom that maternity clothes have vastly improved since my baby boomer mom and Gen-X cousins were pregnant. Now that I’m shopping for a third-trimester baby bump, I realize my faith was misplaced. The maternity clothing market is a floral-festooned, polyester-laden sartorial wasteland. It utterly fails to account for either the varied lives women lead or the different ways they wish to present themselves. And the shopping experience ranges from maddening to puzzling.View this post on Instagram A post shared by A Pea In The Pod (@apeainthepodmaternity) on Mar 8, 2019 at 12:00pm PSTAll of this amounts to an indefensible and avoidable failure on the part of the beleaguered retail industry. Great maternity departments should be an easy way to attract millennial moms — ostensibly one of the industry’s most coveted demographic groups. True, newcomer websites such as Asos Plc and Boohoo Plc carry garments that reflect actual current trends. But much of what’s out there has a distinct, one-note look I have come to think of as “mommycore”: bland t-shirts, juvenile-looking babydoll frocks, uncomfortably low-cut wrap dresses, and flower patterns that resemble the upholstery on your grandmother’s couch. The industry’s idea of creativity seems to be confined to inane tops stamped with Instagrammable messages like “Milkmachine” and “I like to think wine misses me too.”View this post on Instagram A post shared by Motherhood Maternity (@motherhoodmaternity) on Oct 1, 2019 at 4:26pm PDTWomen embrace all sorts of styles in everyday life — edgy motorcycle jackets, elegant sheath dresses, Supreme-inspired streetwear. But in pregnancy, they have little choice but to sport the mommycore uniform.Need something to project confidence for a big client presentation? Ann Taylor has no maternity suiting to offer you, nor does Express or White House Black Market. Working up a sweat at the gym? Lululemon Athletica Inc. and Nike Inc. will be of little help. Searches for maternity gear on their websites turn up no specially designed products.Now, you might say this is what specialty maternity stores are for: They have outfits for all occasions that accommodate a baby bump. But consider what women are in for when they hit up one of these retailers. Destination Maternity Corp. is the corporate parent of its namesake chain, as well as Motherhood Maternity and A Pea in the Pod. The company’s revenue has nosedived as it struggled to adapt to changing fashion trends, the rise of e-commerce and new competitors. It has had five CEOs in five years, a mess that culminated in an October bankruptcy filing. Put another way, the one company that essentially has had the U.S. specialty maternity market to itself has been spectacularly bad at giving expectant women what they want.And it’s not as if higher-end retailers are doing much better. Poke around the limited selection on the websites of Saks Fifth Avenue or Net-a-Porter, and you might think rich women just don’t get pregnant.It’s more than the narrow clothing choices that are frustrating. The process of selecting maternity wear is a hassle. I appreciate that Macy’s Inc. and Rent the Runway, for example, allow me to sort their online offerings by trimester, a welcome acknowledgment that the clothes which fit me now would’ve made me look like a deflated balloon just a few months ago.But the industry could do much more. More retailers should carry maternity clothes in brick-and-mortar stores instead of restricting them to e-commerce. Ariane Goldman, the founder of maternity-focused startup Hatch, told me she is opening stores because she found that Hatch customers spend three times as much in person than they typically do online. No wonder: When your bust and waist measurements are an ever-growing surprise, it’s especially helpful to try things on before buying.For online customers, product descriptions should clearly explain how a “maternity cardigan” is cut differently than a regular one. Stores such as J. Crew, which curate a selection of regular-size clothes deemed maternity-friendly, should show a picture of how the pieces fit on a pregnant model. They should provide recommendations for whether to go one or two sizes up.These changes are necessary not simply because women deserve better, though they do. They’re needed because they make business sense.Kohl’s Corp., for example, offers a relatively small selection of maternity wear compared with rivals — even though CEO Michelle Gass earlier this year expressed a desire “to gain share among millennials, especially millennial moms.” What better way to get them to give Kohl’s a shot than making them feel fashionable in the run-up to baby’s arrival?Similarly, Macy’s CEO Jeff Gennette has said the chain must do better with women under 40 — exactly the crowd that needs bump-friendly clothes. Yet it has chosen to depend on troubled Destination Maternity for much of its maternity merchandise, with the specialist operating 390 licensed departments in Macy’s stores as of February.I understand that in some ways the maternity market might look unattractive to retailers. The U.S. birth rate has fallen, for one. Maternity is also a category where it’s virtually impossible to get a customer to come back year after year. Once you’re done having kids, you’re done with maternity clothes.But that is simplistic. A future mom who goes to Target Corp. for its maternity department might end up buying a onesie for the baby — and diapers and groceries, too. Gap Inc. has found that maternity clothing customers of its namesake chain are more likely to be loyal to the brand even after their pregnancy is over. The fashion industry is gradually awakening to the power of inclusivity in its products and marketing. More chains are adding plus sizes, using models with diverse body types or shunning airbrushing in ads. And yet, bewilderingly, this new awareness has not translated into paying more attention to the needs of pregnant women.It is a reality I am acutely aware of: The button-up shirtdress I’m wearing as I write this is literally taped together at my belly. It’s my attempt to prolong the life of an item I bought less than two months ago, because I can’t bear any more hours on the internet or at the mall looking at clothes that don’t flatter me or give me confidence.It doesn’t have to be this way. I typically enjoy shopping for new clothes. If retailers try harder, my baby bump — and countless other baby bumps — could be the birth of a new and lucrative customer relationship.To contact the author of this story: Sarah Halzack at shalzack@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Newman at mnewman43@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Sarah Halzack is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She was previously a national retail reporter for the Washington Post.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Should You Be Pleased About The CEO Pay At The Gap, Inc.'s (NYSE:GPS)
    Simply Wall St.

    Should You Be Pleased About The CEO Pay At The Gap, Inc.'s (NYSE:GPS)

    Art Peck became the CEO of The Gap, Inc. (NYSE:GPS) in 2015. First, this article will compare CEO compensation with...

  • Old Navy Offers 50% Off Everything In-Store & Online During Three-Day Extended Black Friday Sale
    Business Wire

    Old Navy Offers 50% Off Everything In-Store & Online During Three-Day Extended Black Friday Sale

    Old Navy to Donate $1 to Boys & Girls Clubs for Every Pair of $1 Cozy Socks Purchased During Two-Day ‘Shock of a Dolla’ Sale, Up to $1 Million

  • Janie and Jack and Fashion Influencer Eva Chen Debut Second Limited Edition Juno Valentine Collection
    Business Wire

    Janie and Jack and Fashion Influencer Eva Chen Debut Second Limited Edition Juno Valentine Collection

    Today, children’s fashion brand Janie and Jack and fashion influencer Eva Chen debut the second installment of the Juno Valentine by Janie and Jack Collection. The collection consists of clothing, swimsuits, shoes, and accessories inspired by the fashion icons from Chen’s newest children’s book, Juno Valentine and the Fantastic Fashion Adventure, published by Feiwel and Friends and released on October 29th.

  • JUUL Continues to Unravel as Altria's (MO) Q3 Earnings Near
    Zacks

    JUUL Continues to Unravel as Altria's (MO) Q3 Earnings Near

    Altria (MO) is set to report its third quarter results on Thursday, October 31 before the opening bell.

  • Zacks Value Trader Highlights: Merck, Disney, Whitestone REIT, Gap and Wells Fargo
    Zacks

    Zacks Value Trader Highlights: Merck, Disney, Whitestone REIT, Gap and Wells Fargo

    Zacks Value Trader Highlights: Merck, Disney, Whitestone REIT, Gap and Wells Fargo

  • Lessons on How to Build a Million Dollar Portfolio
    Zacks

    Lessons on How to Build a Million Dollar Portfolio

    Anne Scheiber started with $5,000 and in the end her portfolio was worth $22 million. Here???s how she did it.

  • Investing.com

    Stocks - S&P Struggles to a Tiny Gain; Boeing Rises

    Investing.com – Stocks finished the day barely higher as bad news for computer chips was offset by gains for Boeing (NYSE:BA), whose bad news on the 737 Max wasn't as bad as feared.

  • Gap (GPS) Loses 29% YTD: Can Growth Strategies Aid Stock?
    Zacks

    Gap (GPS) Loses 29% YTD: Can Growth Strategies Aid Stock?

    Gap (GPS) witnesses sluggishness at its flagship brand due to traffic challenges and operational headwinds. However, its brand revitalization and omni-channel initiatives are encouraging.

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