GRG.L - Greggs plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
2,382.00
+2.00 (+0.08%)
At close: 4:35PM GMT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close2,380.00
Open2,366.00
Bid2,378.00 x 0
Ask2,330.00 x 0
Day's range2,346.00 - 2,388.12
52-week range1,524.00 - 2,550.00
Volume242,892
Avg. volume367,975
Market cap2.41B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.00
PE ratio (TTM)32.02
EPS (TTM)74.40
Earnings date03 Mar 2020
Forward dividend & yield0.37 (1.53%)
Ex-dividend date05 Sep 2019
1y target est1,340.00
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  • Britain's Greggs to roll out home delivery with Just Eat
    Reuters

    Britain's Greggs to roll out home delivery with Just Eat

    British baker Greggs has joined forces with online food ordering company Just Eat for its latest growth initiative - offering home delivery across the country. Greggs said on Wednesday that following a successful trial in London, Newcastle and Glasgow, it had opted to work exclusively with Just Eat, providing sausage rolls and steak bakes, including vegan-friendly versions, as well as sandwiches and sweet treats, direct to customers' doors. Last week Greggs said it would pay staff a special bonus after a "phenomenal" year that included the launch of the vegan-friendly sausage roll and higher-than-expected profits.

  • Greggs joins up with Just Eat for nationwide delivery rollout
    The Guardian

    Greggs joins up with Just Eat for nationwide delivery rollout

    Greggs joins up with Just Eat for nationwide delivery rolloutBakery firm will start deliveries in Bristol and Birmingham this week after trials elsewhere

  • Can Greggs shares continue to rise? Here’s 3 reasons why I think they can
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  • Horrid Holidays Can't All Be Blamed on Brexit
    Bloomberg

    Horrid Holidays Can't All Be Blamed on Brexit

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Christmas 2019 should be consigned to the dustbin along with the crumpled wrapping paper and the wilted tree. That’s the message that has come in loud and clear from British retailers. And it caps off a miserable year. Total sales for 2019 fell by 0.1%, the worst year on record, according to the British Retail Consortium and KPMG.There’s no doubt consumers were cautious in the run-up to the holidays. But store groups can’t blame it all on Brexit. There were some own goals, too.Wm Morrison Supermarkets Plc missed the halo effect from Black Friday by reining in promotions right as shoppers sought deals during the U.S-imported retail frenzy. Marks & Spencer Group Plc also hasn’t participated for the past few years. While it’s the right instinct to protect against diluting margins ahead of the holiday season, going too far to do so is painful too.John Lewis Partnership Plc warned that its profit would be “significantly lower” than a year ago, and parted company with the head of its department-store arm, Paula Nickolds. It’s hard not to think the privately held company’s challenges have been made worse by some of its own decisions, such as blindly sticking to its pledge to always be cheaper than rivals. Times have changed since the promise was made many years ago, and it’s become untenable in a market characterized by intense and constant discounting.But perhaps the performance by M&S is the most disappointing. After seeing some positive signs in women’s wear, it made a fashion faux pas in men’s clothing by getting too trendy for many of its customers. Its range of more contemporary, slim fitting shirts and suits weren’t on trend with its predominantly older shopper base, and it simply stocked too many small sizes than was reasonable.The high street stalwart also didn’t have the right Christmas gifts, having gone down market just as consumers were seeking more expensive items, such as cashmere sweaters, and more experiential gifts such as spa days. Consequently, M&S’s like-for-like sales in clothing and home furnishings fell 1.7% in the third quarter, worse than the consensus of analysts’ expectations for a 0.8% decline.The performance is particularly disappointing given that many of M&S’s key competitors, including Debenhams Plc, John Lewis department stores, Mike Ashley’s House of Fraser and Philip Green’s Arcadia, are not firing on all cylinders. And the self-inflicted damage wasn’t confined to clothing. Although demand for M&S’s Christmas food was strong, it wasn’t as pronounced as it had hoped. It misread the market, buying too much festive fare to make sure it had enough available and wound up with far too many leftovers once the holidays came to an end. Consequently, gross margins are expected to be at the lower end of expectations.The shares fell as much as 11.6%. It isn’t the first time M&S has messed up at Christmas. In the past, it suffered from problems at a key distribution center at Castle Donington in central England. This year that facility held up, but the new round of blunders is worrying. In contrast, other groups that have been operating quietly without hiccups, such as Tesco Plc, Greggs Plc and discount home-furnishings retailer Dunelm Group Plc, delivered solid performances. It will also be worth watching out for Associated British Foods Plc, which should have benefited from Primark’s strong selection of gifts and party dresses in the run up to the holiday.With any Boris bounce after the U.K. election proving elusive, 2020 is set to remain tough. The lesson from this Christmas trading season is that to prosper, retailers need to stick to their knitting, and ensure that their own actions don’t make an already difficult backdrop even worse.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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  • Sky News

    Greggs to pay £7m to workers after 'exceptional' year boosted by vegan ranges

    Bakery chain Greggs is to pay out an employee bonus totalling £7m after a "phenomenal" year during which its sales have been boosted by new vegan ranges. The payment at the end of January, which will see thousands of workers each receive £300, was announced as the company's latest trading update saw it upgrade full-year profit expectations. Greggs, which has more than 2,000 shops across the UK and employs about 25,000 people, said like-for-like sales in company-managed stores rose by 9.2% in the year to 28 December.

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  • Greggs staff to cash in on UK vegan sausage roll success
    Reuters

    Greggs staff to cash in on UK vegan sausage roll success

    British bakery operator Greggs said will pay staff a special bonus after what the CEO described as a "phenomenal" year that included the launch of a vegan-friendly sausage roll and higher-than-expected profits. Greggs, present in more than 2,000 stores in Britain, recently also launched a vegan version of its steak bake as more and more Britons try to cut down on meat and dairy. The company said it would spend 7 million pounds ($9.2 million) on a one-off payment for its 25,000 employees, giving around 19,000 of its longest-serving staff about 300 pounds each.

  • Greggs employees to share £7m bonus after ‘exceptional’ year
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Greggs employees to share £7m bonus after ‘exceptional’ year

    Greggs said bumper growth in 2019 was driven by strong demand across its traditional product range and the 'huge popularity' of its vegan sausage roll.

  • Greggs to pay workers £7m bonus after vegan sausage roll success
    The Guardian

    Greggs to pay workers £7m bonus after vegan sausage roll success

    Greggs to pay workers £7m bonus after vegan sausage roll success. Bakery chain’s 25,000 employees will receive up to £300 in this month’s pay packet

  • Should you buy Greggs stock now the vegan steak bake is out?
    Fool.co.uk

    Should you buy Greggs stock now the vegan steak bake is out?

    Greggs is up 500% since 2013. Michael Taylor looks at whether it could still be a buy.

  • Greggs follows vegan sausage roll success with meatless steak bake
    Reuters

    Greggs follows vegan sausage roll success with meatless steak bake

    Britain's Greggs launched a vegan version of its popular steak bake on Thursday, aiming to capitalise on the success of the meatless sausage roll that has boosted the baker's profits and helped fuel an 80% rise in its share price last year. Greggs said the new product mirrored the original but used meat substitute Quorn instead of steak in its filling. The launch, which was trailed on social media, comes a year after it introduced its vegan sausage roll, which it said was one of its fastest selling products of the last six years.

  • Can Greggs plc's (LON:GRG) ROE Continue To Surpass The Industry Average?
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  • Sky News

    Greggs launches vegan steak bake to rival its meat-free sausage roll

    Vegan Greggs enthusiasts across the UK are starting the new year with good news. The new meat-free baked product follows on from the chain's vegan sausage roll, which proved so popular branches across the country repeatedly sold out of the item and was credited with the company's profit boost. Greggs, which has more than 2,000 outlets across the UK, reported that the vegan roll was one of its fastest-selling products of the last six years.

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  • Why Greggs plc (LON:GRG) Should Be In Your Dividend Portfolio
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  • How a Vegan, Alcohol-Free Christmas Is Taking Over the World
    Bloomberg

    How a Vegan, Alcohol-Free Christmas Is Taking Over the World

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- This Christmas, instead of a free-range turkey, how about a beef-less Wellington washed down with a few glasses of “Nosecco”? And rather than falling asleep watching the Queen, why not tune in to your inner self with a spot of meditation?This might not sound like traditional festive fun, but now that the craze for all things vegan has crossed the Atlantic, it’s what British retailers are betting on to lift sluggish supermarket sales and see off brutal conditions on the high street, at least for a spell.A rough estimate suggests that across the big U.K. supermarket chains, meat-free offerings of traditional Christmas fare are up by between 40% and 400% this year. This underlines how veganism has moved from niche to mainstream over the course of 2019 as more  consumers cut out animal products altogether, or reduce their meat intake with a “flexitarian” diet. Just look at the popularity of the vegan sausage roll introduced by baker Greggs Plc. There’s likely to be at least one vegan at any big Christmas gathering, and so being able to cater for them with plant-based canapés is crucial. And while many families won’t ditch the turkey altogether, they may well replace another meat protein, such as beef or gammon, with a fancy nut roast, savory yule log or vegetable wreath. Sales of plant-based substitutes still represent a small share of the overall grocery market, but they can have a significant influence over shopping habits. Being able to buy a good selection of food for a vegan daughter, for example, is likely to determine where shoppers fill up their grocery carts for the whole family. No wonder the category has become a key battleground.There’s another reason why it’s worth supermarkets’ while to go vegan. Plant-based versions of festive favorites such as pigs in blankets tend to be more complex to make and require innovative ingredients. J Sainsbury Plc is this year offering party food made from the blossom of the banana tree, which can be used as a substitute for fish. This builds on the popularity of the jackfruit, a tropical fruit that is a good alternative to pulled pork. All of this added value means supermarkets can charge a premium.QuicktakeThe Vegan EconomyThat won’t last forever though. The U.K. arms of the German discounters Aldi and Lidl are piling into this market too. Lidl has two Christmas-specific vegan lines, while Aldi has nine, including pastry crowns and vegan cocktail sausage rolls. Neither had a plant-based offering last year. Wm Morrison Supermarkets Plc recently cut the price of its foods that are free from certain ingredients, such as gluten, while Tesco Plc has launched an affordable plant-based range.In another sign of the times, supermarkets this Christmas season are bulking up on party drinks that are low in alcohol, or contain none at all. Not only do they  tend to be premium products, particularly non-alcoholic spirits, but retailers don’t pay duty. So, while they can charge the same or more for a fancy but sober drink, they get to keep a bigger slice of the selling price.It helps that the market is growing rapidly, as many consumers, particularly younger people captivated more by their social media feeds than their real social life, reduce their alcohol intake. Beer led the way, spawning Budweiser’s Prohibition Brew and Brewdog’s Nanny State, with wines and particularly spirits exploding this year. Demand from supermarket shoppers follows the trend in clubs and pubs where “mocktails” are now a staple of the cocktail menu. Going on the wagon is usually associated with January, but the run-up to Christmas can also be a time for restraint as people become more conscious of pacing themselves through rounds of festive events, not to mention all of those designated drivers. Asda, the U.K. arm of Walmart Inc., estimated that December sales of low- and no-alcohol drinks are double those of the average month. It’s all part of the new mood around Christmas, characterized by rising environmental awareness and a focus on health and wellness. Throw in the ongoing uncertainty around Brexit and the general election, and there are fewer celebrity blockbuster Christmas advertisements this year, with most retailers returning to traditional themes such as family and nostalgia for the past.Even tree trimmings are falling in with the trend. The Sanctuary range from John Lewis features pastel hued baubles including Buddha heads and an ornament depicting a woman reclining in a luxurious bubble bath. Its focus is on serenity — something that’s often in short supply over the busy festive season.After the decorations come down, consumers may continue to embrace plant-based diets with Veganuary, which has rocketed in popularity over the past five years. Dry January will bolster sales of no- and low-alcohol ranges.  But beyond that, it could well be retailers themselves that are in need of some self-care. The months following the holidays are often lean ones, as consumers rein in spending after the excess of Christmas. It can also be tricky for supermarkets to accurately gauge demand and control waste when consumers switch in and out of different food and drink trends so dramatically. This year could be particularly hard if the election is followed by the return of fretting over Brexit. So these swings will be an extra burden to manage.The New Year hangover may still be with us, even if it is an alcohol-free one.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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