GSK.L - GlaxoSmithKline plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
1,822.80
-0.20 (-0.01%)
At close: 4:37PM GMT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close1,823.00
Open1,823.60
Bid1,822.60 x 0
Ask1,824.80 x 0
Day's range1,821.40 - 1,857.00
52-week range1,429.80 - 1,857.00
Volume7,133,504
Avg. volume7,795,919
Market cap91.1B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.37
PE ratio (TTM)19.96
EPS (TTM)91.30
Earnings date05 Feb 2020
Forward dividend & yield0.92 (5.05%)
Ex-dividend date20 Feb 2020
1y target est1,644.50
  • Bayer Looks Well Beyond Its $10 Billion Roundup Payout
    Bloomberg

    Bayer Looks Well Beyond Its $10 Billion Roundup Payout

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Investors aren’t waiting for a definitive deal to end the mass of lawsuits against Bayer AG before snapping up the shares. The German life sciences group’s 75 billion euro ($83 billion) market value is up some 26 billion euros in seven months on hopes that thousands of claims related to its glyphosate-based Roundup weedkiller, accused of causing cancer, might be resolved in a settlement. There’s a risk that shareholder expectations are getting carried away.Talks about a deal do appear constructive, based on the tone of limited statements made by the legal mediator Ken Feinberg. Bayer’s lawyers have in some discussions proposed the firm pays $8 billion to settle existing suits and sets aside $2 billion for future claims, Bloomberg News reported Thursday. That was well received by the market, which pushed up Bayer stock as much as 4%. The $10 billion total is consistent with the cost that analysts have put on a settlement.What’s striking about Bayer is that despite its recent rally the stock still trades at a substantial discount to peers, and removing this would be worth much more than the settlement costs being discussed. The company trades at 9 times expected Ebitda. Its pharmaceutical peers command valuations of 11.2 to 17.5 times. Just getting to a valuation matching its cheapest counterparts would add about 20 billion euros of market value, after deducting the estimated cost of ending litigation. A re-rating toward the average of its peer group would see Bayer’s market value rise even more substantially.Investors are right to retain a degree of caution amid the evidence of progress. What Bayer’s lawyers put forward in talks is only a piece of the jigsaw. The number for a final cap on the cost of the glyphosate litigation remains unknown. Bayer has suggested it’s willing to fight if an acceptable figure cannot be agreed. Citing studies, the company says glyphosate is safe when used as directed. There remains a real possibility that the saga endures for longer than investors believe.The other difficult question is whether Bayer deserves a valuation more generous than that commanded by its cheapest peers — such as GlaxoSmithKline Plc, Sanofi and Roche Holding AG. The same management is in place that led Bayer into this mess via an overpriced $66 billion acquisition of U.S. seeds group Monsanto Co. (the owner of Roundup). The touted benefits of that deal, and the logic of marrying crop science and pharmaceuticals, are yet to manifest themselves fully in sales and profit.A premium valuation will need to be earned. From here, the gains to Bayer’s shares will depend on definitive progress both on the litigation — and on operational performance.To contact the author of this story: Chris Hughes at chughes89@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Hughes is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals. He previously worked for Reuters Breakingviews, as well as the Financial Times and the Independent newspaper.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • No savings at 50? I’d buy these 2 FTSE 100 stocks to retire on a rising passive income
    Fool.co.uk

    No savings at 50? I’d buy these 2 FTSE 100 stocks to retire on a rising passive income

    These two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) dividend heroes could make your retirement more comfortable.The post No savings at 50? I'd buy these 2 FTSE 100 stocks to retire on a rising passive income appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Roche wins approval for cancer drug Kadcyla in fast-growing China market

    BEIJING/ZURICH Jan 22 (Reuters) - Roche said on Wednesday China had approved the import of its Kadcyla drug for breast cancer, another win for the Swiss drugmaker in its second-biggest market where rising demand has helped drive its increased sales and profit. Kadcyla, which also recently won expanded approval in the United States, Canada and Europe for more breast-cancer patients, is an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), a class of therapies that combine monoclonal antibodies with cytotoxic chemical that in 2019 picked up momentum with a record number of U.S. approvals.

  • Reuters

    'Pay-for-delay' deals over drug generics unlawful - EU court adviser

    An adviser to the European Court of Justice said on Wednesday that an agreement to settle a patent dispute between a pharmaceutical company and generic competitors may harm competition. The case relates to an agreement British drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline struck with generic drug companies to pay them over 50 million pounds to delay the potential entry of independent competitors to its antidepressant Seroxat.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    "Pay-for-delay" deals over drug generics unlawful- EU court adviser

    An adviser to the European Court of Justice said on Wednesday that an agreement to settle a patent dispute between a pharmaceutical company and generic competitors may harm competition. The case relates to an agreement British drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline struck with generic drug companies to pay them over 50 million pounds to delay the potential entry of independent competitors to its antidepressant Seroxat.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Pharma firms not making enough progress against superbugs - report

    Drug companies are not making progress against the spread of antibiotic resistance at a scale and speed great enough to tackle the global health threat posed by superbugs, a key benchmark analysis found on Tuesday. The findings of a second Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Benchmark report showed that while a few pharmaceutical companies are expanding their efforts, change is not happening at the scale needed to radically impact the problem. In India, drug resistance exceeds 70% for many widespread bacteria, the AMR report said.

  • Bloomberg

    Glaxo, Pfizer Executives Out of Step on Consumer Unit’s Future

    (Bloomberg) -- U.K. drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline Plc hasn’t made plans to pursue an initial public offering of the consumer-health company it set up with Pfizer Inc. last year, a top executive said, distancing himself from remarks made by Pfizer’s chief executive a day earlier.The comments could expose a lack of communication between the two partners. Pfizer’s Chief Executive Officer Albert Bourla yesterday said he expected Glaxo to pursue an IPO in three to four years.“This is the time that we will be able to exit from this partnership, and I’m sure that this business will have a fantastic IPO,” Bourla said at the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco.An IPO isn’t the only option, said David Redfern, Glaxo’s chief strategy officer, in an interview at the meeting. Glaxo said at the time of the deal that it would separate and list the company within three to five years.“Actually we haven’t decided anything,” Redfern said Wednesday. “When we announced the deal, we said we expect it to separate within three years, but actually up to five years. And it’s entirely our decision.”Both Glaxo, the majority owner, and Pfizer, which has about a third of the business, are looking to focus on drug development. Recent shifts in the health-care business and in the broader economy have challenged a model in which drugmakers control every corner of home medicine cabinets.Redfern said the consumer business needed to focus on integration and growing sales, not a spinoff or IPO.“We don’t want it too distracted right now thinking about capital markets,” he said. “Whether it’s an IPO or just a straight spin, all options are on the table. We’ve literally had no discussion” with Pfizer on that topic.With annual sales of about $13 billion, the consumer venture has brought under one roof Advil painkillers, Tums stomach tablets, Sensodyne toothpaste and Nicorette gum.The world’s biggest supplier of over-the-counter medicines will be one of the industry’s only standalones, facing off with companies integrated into larger entities such as Johnson & Johnson, Bayer AG and Procter & Gamble Co.\--With assistance from Mark Schoifet.To contact the reporter on this story: Riley Griffin in New York at rgriffin42@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Drew Armstrong at darmstrong17@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Pfizer Eyes IPO of Glaxo Consumer Venture in 3 to 4 Years
    Bloomberg

    Pfizer Eyes IPO of Glaxo Consumer Venture in 3 to 4 Years

    (Bloomberg) -- Pfizer Inc. is planning an initial public offering of its consumer-health joint venture with GlaxoSmithKline Plc in three to four years as the two drugmakers turn back toward the lab.Pfizer Chief Executive Officer Albert Bourla discussed the time frame for the IPO at the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco on Tuesday. The plan provides New York-based Pfizer with a clear exit strategy, he said.The world’s biggest supplier of over-the-counter medicines will be one of the industry’s only standalones, facing off with companies integrated into larger entities such as Johnson & Johnson, Bayer AG and Procter & Gamble Co.With annual sales of about $13 billion, it brings under one roof Advil painkillers, Tums stomach tablets, Sensodyne toothpaste and Nicorette gum.Both Glaxo, the majority owner, and Pfizer, which has about a third of the business, are looking to focus on drug development. Recent shifts in the health-care business and in the broader economy have challenged a model in which drugmakers control every corner of home medicine cabinets.Big pharma companies are increasingly focused on developing high-priced new medicines that draw on cutting-edge research in genetics and other fields. At the same time, the cost of researching new cures is climbing even as insurers and governments demand lower prices.On the consumer-health front, intense price competition online from the likes of Amazon as well as own-brand store products have dented margins in the U.S. and parts of Europe.When the deal was announced, Glaxo said it expected a listing within three years of its close, which took place last August.Glaxo shares rose less than 1% to 1,815 pence in London trading. (Updates with industry context in third and fourth paragraphs)To contact the reporter on this story: Mark Schoifet in New York at mschoifet@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Drew Armstrong at darmstrong17@bloomberg.net, Marthe FourcadeFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Measuring the quality of Glaxosmithkline as an investment
    Stockopedia

    Measuring the quality of Glaxosmithkline as an investment

    A company with a high Quality Rank has strong cash-generation, consistent profits, high rates of return on investment, high margins and robust financial health8230;

  • Have £3k to invest? 3 healthcare stocks I’d buy for 2020
    Fool.co.uk

    Have £3k to invest? 3 healthcare stocks I’d buy for 2020

    Ageing populations and fast-growing emerging markets make these stocks a buy, says Roland Head.

  • 2 FTSE 100 dividend stocks I’d buy and hold for the next 10 years
    Fool.co.uk

    2 FTSE 100 dividend stocks I’d buy and hold for the next 10 years

    These two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) shares could offer income investing potential in my opinion.

  • I think this FTSE 100 dividend stock could double investors’ money
    Fool.co.uk

    I think this FTSE 100 dividend stock could double investors’ money

    This FTSE 100 company is set to benefit tremendously from global growth, and investors should be well rewarded.

  • Should You Be Excited About GlaxoSmithKline plc's (LON:GSK) 28% Return On Equity?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should You Be Excited About GlaxoSmithKline plc's (LON:GSK) 28% Return On Equity?

    Many investors are still learning about the various metrics that can be useful when analysing a stock. This article is...

  • Exclusive: Drugmakers from Pfizer to GSK to hike U.S. prices on over 200 drugs
    Reuters

    Exclusive: Drugmakers from Pfizer to GSK to hike U.S. prices on over 200 drugs

    Drugmakers including Pfizer Inc , GlaxoSmithKline PLC and Sanofi SA are planning to hike U.S. list prices on more than 200 drugs in the United States on Wednesday, according to drugmakers and data analyzed by healthcare research firm 3 Axis Advisors. Nearly all of the price increases will be below 10%, and around half of them are in the range of 4 to 6%, said 3 Axis co-founder Eric Pachman. More price increases are expected to be announced later this week, which could affect the median and range.

  • Does GlaxoSmithKline (LON:GSK) have an economic moat?
    Stockopedia

    Does GlaxoSmithKline (LON:GSK) have an economic moat?

    When it comes to investing, I'm convinced it pays to buy and hold the best quality companies possible. I'm talking about some of the market's most respected na8230;

  • Looking for dividend stocks for retirement? I think you’ll love these FTSE 100 companies
    Fool.co.uk

    Looking for dividend stocks for retirement? I think you’ll love these FTSE 100 companies

    When it comes to dividend stocks for retirement, you need to be selective, says Edward Sheldon. Now is not the time to be taking large risks.

  • Investment lessons from Warren Buffett and the man who taught him how to make millions
    Fool.co.uk

    Investment lessons from Warren Buffett and the man who taught him how to make millions

    Even the Oracle of Omaha had a mentor in Benjamin Graham, and you can learn something from both of them.

  • A 4.5% FTSE 100 dividend yield I’d buy for my ISA and never sell!
    Fool.co.uk

    A 4.5% FTSE 100 dividend yield I’d buy for my ISA and never sell!

    Royston Wild explains why this FTSE 100 dividend stock is a top buy today.

  • Why I think the GSK share price could keep rising in 2020
    Fool.co.uk

    Why I think the GSK share price could keep rising in 2020

    The GlaxoSmithKline plc (LON: GSK) share price has hit an 18-year high. Roland Head remains bullish.

  • How I’d invest in 2020 to retire early
    Fool.co.uk

    How I’d invest in 2020 to retire early

    I'd say high-quality and consistent growth is key in stock selection.

  • This is how much £1K invested in GSK shares 5 years ago would be worth today
    Fool.co.uk

    This is how much £1K invested in GSK shares 5 years ago would be worth today

    GlaxoSmithKline plc (LON: GSK) is a popular stock. But has it been a good investment?

  • Britain's GSK seeks U.S approval for rival to J&J's multiple myeloma drug
    Reuters

    Britain's GSK seeks U.S approval for rival to J&J's multiple myeloma drug

    New data from the treatment, belantamab mafodotin, showed 30 of 97 patients experienced a reduction in their myeloma cells at the end of a mid-stage study, DREAMM-2. The trial was testing belantamab mafodotin, also known as GSK2857916, in patients who had received four to seven prior other treatments, including J&J and Genmab's blockbuster drug Darzalex. Data earlier this month showed Darzalex cut the risk of death or worsening cancer by 37% in patients with multiple myeloma, a cancer of the white blood cells.

  • Dealmakers Will Test Johnson’s Open-Market Cred
    Bloomberg

    Dealmakers Will Test Johnson’s Open-Market Cred

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The U.K.’s election of a right-wing, pro-market government with a thumping majority would certainly seem like a green light to foreign companies wanting to buy London-listed rivals. But the new political climate for takeovers may be hazier than it seems.Boris Johnson’s administration is still only four months old, so it’s hard to know precisely how it would approach a sizable, serious, fully funded foreign takeover bid. The old chestnuts that surface now and again include an attempt on the big drugmakers, AstraZeneca Plc or GlaxoSmithKline Plc, a tilt by Exxon Mobil Corp. for BP Plc, or even a U.S. bid for BAE Systems Plc, despite the government having a veto via a “golden share.”A proposal to take over these particular British icons would be controversial, and each has its strategic and financial obstacles (AstraZeneca is expensive; oil companies are trying to get away from oil, not buy more). Yet getting the political calculation right may prove even trickier.Although Johnson hasn’t made the same protectionist noises as his predecessor, Theresa May, the U.K. has been taking a more interventionist stance on M&A lately. It’s now the norm for bidders in sensitive sectors to accept restrictions on how they’ll manage the assets they acquire, as seen most recently with the private-equity-led deals for defense contractor Cobham Plc and satellite operator Inmarsat Plc. The Competition and Markets Authority, the U.K.’s trustbuster, is getting tougher too. Witness its examination of Amazon.com Inc.’s minority stake in food-delivery group Deliveroo, even though the e-commerce giant would not have control.The question is whether the current level of scrutiny is where it peaks.Johnson is in a bind. The extra seats that delivered his majority were secured by votes potentially “lent,” to use the premier’s own phrase, from supporters of the opposition Labour Party, including those in Britain’s industrial heartlands. Johnson won’t want to alienate these voters by hastily endorsing deals that could threaten U.K. jobs or deliver prized national assets to foreign owners. Despite the Conservative Party’s longstanding laissez-faire approach to markets, the nationalist undercurrent remains strong in British politics.On the other hand, if the bearish analyses of Brexit's impact prove true, the U.K. economy is in for a difficult time in the years ahead. Johnson will want to attract foreign investment, and flat resistance to any overseas bid would surely be a deterrent to the international business audience. Potential U.S. bidders may judge that Johnson will also want to keep President Donald Trump happy if he is to secure the wide-ranging free-trade deal he campaigned on.Johnson, then, will be torn between his new Labour supporters and global business. Predicting where he’ll side isn’t easy. But when push comes to shove, and with the next election years away, it seems likely that he’d follow the money. Logic suggests that deal-hungry CEOs will now feel more confident testing Britain’s open-market credentials.To contact the author of this story: Chris Hughes at chughes89@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Timothy Lavin at tlavin1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Hughes is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals. He previously worked for Reuters Breakingviews, as well as the Financial Times and the Independent newspaper.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Forget the Cash ISA! I’d buy this FTSE 100 dividend stock to retire on
    Fool.co.uk

    Forget the Cash ISA! I’d buy this FTSE 100 dividend stock to retire on

    With its healthy cash flows and defensive market position, this FTSE 100 stock is worth owning in your retirement portfolio, says Rupert Hargreaves.

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