HPQ - HP Inc.

NYSE - Nasdaq Real-time price. Currency in USD
15.97
+0.25 (+1.59%)
At close: 4:02PM EDT

15.97 0.00 (0.00%)
After hours: 4:40PM EDT

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Previous close15.72
Open16.03
Bid15.76 x 800
Ask15.97 x 1200
Day's range15.85 - 16.49
52-week range12.54 - 23.93
Volume10,951,388
Avg. volume14,204,565
Market cap22.833B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.35
PE ratio (TTM)7.90
EPS (TTM)2.02
Earnings date06 May 2020 - 10 May 2020
Forward dividend & yield0.70 (4.48%)
Ex-dividend date09 Mar 2020
1y target est20.88
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  • Bloomberg

    Samsung's Symptom-Less Earnings Don't Make It Immune

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Earnings released early Tuesday by Samsung Electronics Co. show that the technology giant dodged any major impact from the Covid-19 pandemic. Expect that to change.Revenue growth was the strongest in six quarters, though 5% is hardly stellar. And while it was in line with estimates, analysts had been trimming expectations over the past few months. That also applies to the better-than-forecast operating profit, with analysts having lowered the bar in recent weeks.Investors should also note that earnings are reported in Korean won. Samsung’s numbers may have been helped by the fact that the won weakened 6.1% against the U.S. dollar in the quarter, the most in more than four years (the currency swung wildly during the period, so the company’s average exchange rate may have been different).With the coronavirus having shut down swathes of the global economy, any growth is to be lauded. Peers including Apple Inc. aren’t likely to have performed as well. But don’t be fooled into thinking that Samsung is in the clear. Much of the strength during the period probably came from its chip business, driven by the needs of internet companies like web-conferencing provider Zoom Video Communications Inc. These have had to boost server capacity to cope with higher demand from employees forced to work from home amid the pandemic.More than 40% of Samsung’s revenue comes from handsets. This sector was already looking lackluster before the coronavirus outbreak. Now, with the U.S. having reported an astonishing 10 million new jobless claims within two weeks, much of Europe on lockdown, and most of Asia in varying degrees of economic strife, it’s unlikely that consumers are eager to pony up for a flashy new smartphone.Apple’s largest supplier has already felt the pinch. On Monday, its Taiwanese assembler Hon Hai Precision Industry Co. announced first-quarter revenue dropped 12%. While Apple accounts for half of Hon Hai’s sales, the other half comes from a broad collection of companies including Dell Technologies Inc., HP Inc. and Xiaomi Corp. It’s unlikely any of them will come through this economic downturn unscathed.Samsung has the strength, and most importantly the cash, to ride out what will certainly be a tough few quarters for the global economy. That size doesn’t give it immunity.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tim Culpan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Virus Didn't Have to Ground This Aviation Deal

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Who’s willing to bet on the aerospace industry’s quick return from the coronavirus devastation? Not the CEOs of two of its leading suppliers. Woodward Inc. and Hexcel Corp. mutually agreed to call off their planned merger in light of the current pandemic. More than half of the world’s fleet has been grounded as travel bans and fear of contagion keep fliers at home, forcing the aerospace industry into a fight for its survival. This isn’t the first deal to get scotched because of the coronavirus: Xerox Holdings Corp. called off its $35 billion hostile pursuit of HP Inc. and private equity firm Apollo Global Management Inc. reportedly abandoned talks with TV-station owner Tegna Inc. for an $8.5 billion takeover. But both of those transactions reportedly involved at least some cash, which has become a precious commodity in the age of the coronavirus. The Woodward-Hexcel merger, by contrast, was all-stock, and as such, not dependent on capricious debt markets and an ill-timed overloading of balance sheets.There were some signs the companies were still being punished for going through with the deal: As of Friday, Hexcel and Woodward had each dropped more than 55% since the merger was announced in mid-January, compared with a decline of about 35% for the SPDR S&P Aerospace & Defense ETF. At those prices, the deal terms valued Hexcel at about $32 a share, or about $3.7 billion including debt, compared with an enterprise value of about $7.5 billion when the merger was first announced.While Hexcel shares declined Monday on news that the merger was off, Woodward’s stock rallied more than 10%. That gain feels short-sighted. If you liked an aerospace combination that “brings together a broad, unparalleled portfolio of leading-edge technologies” with a “strong balance sheet” in January, you should like it even more in April. The fact that the companies themselves aren’t convinced of this is on the one hand a sign of just how deep and long-lasting the slump in aerospace will be. But it also feels like a missed opportunity. A famous Warren Buffett maxim comes to mind: Be fearful when others are greedy and be greedy when others are fearful. To be sure, one of the big selling points of the Woodward-Hexcel merger was the ability to significantly ramp up research and development spending to better position the combined company to compete on the next generation of aircraft technology, with an eye toward better fuel efficiency and lower emissions. That has likely fallen further down the list of priorities for aerospace companies right now given the virus cash crunch and a drop in oil prices that’s made it more economical to keep flying older, clunkier models. There is also the question of distraction. Big deals are complicated. For all of Hexcel and Woodward’s previous talk of complementary cultures, there are bound to be integration hiccups, particularly when the virus fallout makes it likely job cuts will be in order. Separately on Monday, Woodward said it was implementing “workforce management” policies including a hiring freeze, layoffs and furloughs, without specifying the number of jobs that would be affected. It will also reduce its dividend, eliminate 2020 bonus payments and trim pay for the CEO, board and top officers. Hexcel also announced plans to evaluate employment levels and reduce spending.Still, the trend toward more climate-friendly aircraft is likely to be sustained over the longer term and the companies would have gotten more out of these cost-reduction actions if they were spread out across a bigger, combined entity. “Calling off the merger is clearly bad news for both companies, as we think scaling up makes a lot of sense, particularly when it comes to dealing with a crisis,” Vertical Research Partners analyst Rob Stallard wrote in a note. Both Woodward and Hexcel also announced shareholder rights plans meant to guard against unwanted takeover advances in a sign they are worried someone else will have take advantage of their depressed stock prices and have the gumption to pull off a deal that they couldn’t.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brooke Sutherland is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and industrial companies. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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  • Coronavirus Crisis Brings Xerox-HP Takeover Battle to End
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  • Bloomberg

    Xerox Ends Its Hostile Pursuit of HP, Finally

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- It’s finally over.Xerox Holdings Corp. announced late Tuesday that it is abandoning its tender offer to acquire HP Inc., citing the global health crisis from Covid-19 and the ensuing difficult market environment. The maker of photocopiers also called off its effort to enter into a proxy fight to replace HP’s board. It marks the end of a dramatic back-and-forth struggle that began last November, when Xerox began its pursuit of  HP, the second-largest computer maker. HP has repeatedly rejected Xerox’s overtures, including its most recent offer, valued at about $35 billion. But while Xerox is blaming coronavirus, its attempt to take over a company more than three times its size never made much sense in the first place. Not only would it require tens of billions in inherently risky debt financing —  the whole strategy of buying a secularly challenged business and relying primarily on cost savings was never a winner.In February, for example, HP reported a 7% decline in its printer revenue and a 10% drop in printer-hardware unit sales for its fiscal first quarter ended in January. Cost cutting is not going to save this troubled business. Xerox wasn’t much better when it posted a sales decline for its December quarter.Both companies should instead focus on figuring out new growth strategies for their respective businesses, instead of being distracted by M&A and financial engineering.Adding two dinosaurs together was never going to magically make a new tech behemoth.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tae Kim is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Barron's, following an earlier career as an equity analyst.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Xerox drops $34B HP takeover bid amid COVID-19 uncertainty
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    Xerox drops $34B HP takeover bid amid COVID-19 uncertainty

    Xerox announced today that it would be dropping its hostile takeover bid of HP. The drama began last fall with a flurry of increasingly angry letters between the two companies, and confrontational actions from Xerox, including an attempt to take over the HP board that had rejected its takeover overtures. All that came crashing to the ground today when Xerox officially announced it was backing down amid worldwide economic uncertainty related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Bloomberg

    Xerox to Drop Its Hostile Bid for HP

    (Bloomberg) -- Xerox Holdings Corp. ended its hostile takeover bid for HP Inc. because of uncertainty stemming from the Covid-19 pandemic, marking a blow to the photocopier company’s efforts to stimulate future growth.The Norwalk, Connecticut-based company will withdraw its tender offer to HP shareholders and stop an effort to win a slate of board directors. Xerox believes the underlying logic behind a combination remains sound and may revisit the idea in the future, said a person familiar with the issue who asked not to be identified discussing company deliberations.“The current global health crisis and resulting macroeconomic and market turmoil caused by Covid-19 have created an environment that is not conducive to Xerox continuing to pursue an acquisition of HP Inc.,” Xerox said Tuesday in a statement. “While it is disappointing to take this step, we are prioritizing the health, safety and well-being of our employees, customers, partners and other stakeholders, and our broader response to the pandemic, over and above all other considerations.”HP, the world’s second-largest computer maker, has repeatedly rebuffed Xerox’s cash-and-stock offers, most recently valued at an estimated $35 billion. In the most recent proposal, an HP holder would have received $18.40 in cash and 0.149 Xerox shares. The offer was set to expire April 21.“We remain firmly committed to driving value for HP shareholders,” the Palo Alto, California-based company said in a statement. “We have a healthy cash position and balance sheet that enable us to navigate unanticipated challenges such as the global pandemic now before us, while preserving strategic optionality for the future.”HP had earlier implored shareholders to reject the tender offer and Xerox board nominees, suggesting that a debt-enabled combination would be “disastrous” for the hardware giant in the current economic environment.HP’s shares fell 1.5% in extended trading after closing at $17.36. Xerox’s stock was little-changed after ending Tuesday’s session at $18.94. The news of Xerox’s decision was reported earlier by the Wall Street Journal.Xerox, which has reported falling revenue, had hitched its future to an acquisition. The company expected that combining the companies would yield $2 billion in cost savings and more than $1 billion in additional revenue growth. Both hardware companies invented technologies still in use by consumers and office workers, and have struggled in a world increasingly driven by software.HP’s board characterized Xerox’s offers as undervaluing the company, and said it will return $16 billion to shareholders in an effort to show HP can stand on its own.Xerox criticized HP for failing to enter into substantive talks that could have led to a merger.“The refusal of HP’s Board to meaningfully engage over many months and its continued delay tactics have proven to be a great disservice to HP stockholders, who have shown tremendous support for the transaction,” Xerox said.(Updates with comment from HP in the fifth paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Xerox abandons $35 billion hostile bid for HP
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    Xerox's decision came after it said earlier this month it would postpone meetings with HP shareholders to focus on coping with the coronavirus pandemic. It represents a victory for HP CEO Enrique Lores, who faced a takeover battle as soon as he took over the reins of the Palo Alto, California-based company in November, and a defeat for Xerox CEO John Visentin, a former Hewlett-Packard and IBM Corp executive with ties to the private equity industry who took over as Xerox CEO in 2018. It is also a blow for billionaire investor Carl Icahn, who owns big stakes in both companies and had pushed for their merger.

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