IAG.L - International Consolidated Airlines Group, S.A.

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
421.80
+5.50 (+1.32%)
At close: 4:37PM BST
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Previous close416.30
Open417.40
Bid402.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's range411.50 - 421.81
52-week range411.50 - 718.40
Volume3,625,298
Avg. volume9,887,683
Market cap8.37B
Beta (3Y monthly)0.88
PE ratio (TTM)2.63
EPS (TTM)160.10
Earnings date31 Oct 2019
Forward dividend & yield0.30 (6.96%)
Ex-dividend date2019-07-04
1y target est7.17
  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 1-Plane used to carry U.S. troops catches fire at Irish airport

    A plane that regularly carries U.S. troops through Ireland's Shannon Airport caught fire shortly before it was due to take off on Thursday, forcing a five-hour suspension of flights at Shannon and cancellation of some trips. Shannon Airport temporarily suspended operations at 0537 GMT after the incident involving an Omni Air International Boeing 767-300 due to depart for the Middle East. Air traffic controllers noticed a fire and smoke coming from the aircraft as it taxied along the runway after having to abort its take-off for technical reasons, according to Niall Maloney, operations director at Shannon Airport.

  • This is the FTSE 100’s cheapest stock. Is it worth buying?
    Fool.co.uk

    This is the FTSE 100’s cheapest stock. Is it worth buying?

    Could this be the most undervalued stock in the FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE: UKX)? Rupert Hargreaves takes a look.

  • Bloomberg

    Companies Puzzled After Report Says Their Biometric Data Leaked

    (Bloomberg) -- Millions of pieces of personal data, including fingerprints, may have been leaked from a cloud-based service that stores biometric data for companies and organizations worldwide, security researchers said.Computer scientists working with software firm VpnMentor said they discovered a vulnerability in South Korean Suprema Inc.’s Biostar 2 program, which left unencrypted usernames and passwords accessible to outsiders.However, implicated companies have expressed confusion and frustration at either being mistaken for different businesses with the same name, or simply not being told soon enough to help them avoid potential data-protection fines.Tile Mountain, a Stoke-on-Trent-based company that was listed in the report, told Bloomberg it hadn’t been made aware of the leak until Wednesday when journalists began getting in touch.“It is concerning that no contact was made to inform us that data may have been compromised," Tile Mountain Information Technology Direct Colin Hampson said in a statement.‘Secure’ Data "This could potentially have prevented Tile Mountain from carrying out its obligations under GDPR," he said, adding that the company is satisfied that its employee and customer data was secure.GDPR, Europe’s strict General Data Protection Regulation, allows companies that fail to adequately protect personal information or alert authorities to breaches, to be handed fines of as much as 4% of their global annual revenue. Marriott International Inc. and British Airways are among those to have fallen on the wrong side of this law.The report also named Phoenix Medical as a U.K.-based firm that had been compromised. But a spokeswoman for the company linked to by VpnMentor said it doesn’t use Biostar 2 and the wrong Phoenix Medical -- of which there are multiple registered on British business registry Companies House -- had been named. VpnMentor later updated its report to identify the correct Phoenix Medical, which is based in Tennessee. A spokesman for the U.S. health-care product manufacturer told Bloomberg it had used Biostar 2, but had not been made aware of a potential breach.London PoliceLondon’s Metropolitan Police force was referred to as a Suprema software user but not explicitly cited as having had its data leaked. Representatives for the Met didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.The South Korean company’s head of marketing, Andy Ahn, told the Guardian, which first reported the breach, it had reviewed information from VpnMentor and would contact any customers if they were discovered to be affected.Noam Rotem and Ran Locar, the internet privacy researchers who discovered the leak, said tens of millions of people could be affected, although there’s no evidence yet that anybody has been. Representatives at Suprema, which is valued at nearly $60 billion, did not respond to requests for comment for this story."With this leak, criminal hackers have complete access to admin accounts on Biostar 2," the researchers wrote in a published Wednesday. "They can use this to take over a high-level account with complete user permissions and security clearances, and make changes to the security settings in an entire network."The researchers said they discovered the vulnerability on Aug. 5 and informed fingerprint identification device maker Suprema, which has since fixed the vulnerability. It’s not clear how long the loophole may have existed.\--With assistance from Stephanie Bodoni.To contact the reporter on this story: Ali Ingersoll in London at aingersoll1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Giles Turner at gturner35@bloomberg.net, Nate Lanxon, Peter ChapmanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • What Hong Kong Airport Disruption Means for Your Travel Plans
    Bloomberg

    What Hong Kong Airport Disruption Means for Your Travel Plans

    (Bloomberg) -- Flights to and from Hong Kong were disrupted for a second day after renewed protests grounded hundreds of services.The airport, Asia’s busiest for international traffic and a key transit point for European trips, resumed operations early Tuesday after Monday’s shutdown, before services were disrupted again when hundreds of black-shirted protesters returned to departure halls.Check-in for outbound flights was halted, though some long-haul operators said they’d maintain inbound services as arrival areas are less affected. Passengers were told to confirm their journeys with airlines before going to the airport.Here’s how carriers are responding to the latest upheaval:Cathay PacificThe Hong Kong airline and its Cathay Dragon unit suspended all check-ins and encouraged passengers to postpone non-essential travel from Hong Kong on Tuesday and Wednesday.Earlier, it canceled more than 200 incoming and outgoing flights amid rescheduling issues even as the airport reopened. Almost all the affected services were in Asia, though some flights to and from the U.S. and Europe were scrubbed.Qantas AirwaysEven before the return of protesters the Australian airline canceled three flights to Hong Kong that were scheduled to leave from Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney on Tuesday.Deutsche LufthansaEurope’s largest airline is looking at canceling Tuesday evening’s flights to Hong Kong from Frankfurt and Munich. The departures aren’t until around 11 p.m. and the carrier plans to reach a decision by about 6 p.m. Lufthansa scrapped the services Monday even after operators continued long-haul services.Air FranceA Tuesday service from Paris Charles de Gaulle arrived unhindered in Hong Kong but a spokesman said the return flight would be postponed amid the renewed protests.KLMSister company KLM said it was maintaining services, with a flight to Amsterdam having already departed Hong Kong before the protests sparked off again and an outbound service due to depart the Dutch city for Asia at 5 p.m.Virgin Atlantic AirwaysThe British carrier is still hoping to operate its departure from Hong Kong to London at 11:55 p.m. local time and said its service from the U.K. will leave as scheduled at 9:50 p.m. It avoided cancellations Monday after a jet that broke down in Hong Kong Sunday was able to make an unscheduled flight to Britain when the airport reopened.Hong Kong AirlinesMore than 20 departures flights into Hong Kong were canceled Tuesday from cities all over Asia including Bangkok, Beijing and Manila, many of them return services for operations that were scrapped Monday.Air ChinaThe state-owned airline said it canceled a dozen flights in and out of Hong Kong.American AirlinesAmerican Airlines Group Inc.’s Tuesday flights from Hong Kong to Dallas and Los Angeles departed as scheduled, a spokeswoman said. A flight from Los Angeles to Hong Kong was canceled.United AirlinesUnited, the U.S. airline with the most service to China, said its Hong Kong flights would operate as normal on Tuesday. The company issued a travel waiver for customers allowing changes to Hong Kong flights scheduled Aug. 12-15.\--With assistance from Ania Nussbaum, Mary Schlangenstein, Justin Bachman, Jack Pitcher, Layan Odeh and Tony Robinson.To contact the reporters on this story: Angus Whitley in Sydney at awhitley1@bloomberg.net;Christopher Jasper in London at cjasper@bloomberg.net;William Wilkes in Frankfurt at wwilkes1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Anthony Palazzo at apalazzo@bloomberg.net, Brendan Case, John BowkerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why Europe’s Short-Haul Aviation Market Is in Flux
    Skift

    Why Europe’s Short-Haul Aviation Market Is in Flux

    Flying within Europe was once a pretty expensive affair. National flag carriers enjoyed route monopolies and could charge whatever they wanted — that is, until the European Union created a single market leading to a boom in low-cost carriers. Not only was it cheaper to travel but there were now more places to travel to. […]The post Why Europe’s Short-Haul Aviation Market Is in Flux appeared first on Skift.

  • Carbon Offsets Mask Aviation Industry’s Lack of Green Alternatives
    Skift

    Carbon Offsets Mask Aviation Industry’s Lack of Green Alternatives

    The airline industry is facing an environmental reckoning. Manufacturers and carriers are still hooked on kerosene with alternative biofuels yet to make any real dent in the market and electric planes still decades away. It's put airlines and governments in a difficult position but at the moment they still seem determined to paper over the […]The post Carbon Offsets Mask Aviation Industry’s Lack of Green Alternatives appeared first on Skift.

  • Tempted by the Thomas Cook share price? Here’s what I think you should know
    Fool.co.uk

    Tempted by the Thomas Cook share price? Here’s what I think you should know

    Thomas Cook Group plc (LON:TCG) looks a bargain, but there may be a better option in rival International Consolidated Airlines Group.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    British Airways cancels some flights due to IT failure

    British Airways said on Wednesday it had cancelled some short-haul flights from Heathrow, Gatwick and London City airports because of an IT systems failure. It said it was offering customers booked on short-haul services departing from London airports the opportunity to rebook on another day.

  • British Airways resuming services after latest IT meltdown
    Reuters

    British Airways resuming services after latest IT meltdown

    British Airways said its flights were returning to normal after passengers had to endure cancellations, delays and long queues at London airports as the airline suffered its third major computer failure in a little more than two years. BA, owned by International Airlines Group, apologised to customers for Wednesday's disruption and warned it would take time for operations to return to normal. More than 60 flights to and from Heathrow and Gatwick were cancelled and more than 100 were delayed, according to the departure boards at the two airports.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 6-British Airways resuming services after latest IT meltdown

    British Airways said its flights were returning to normal after passengers had to endure cancellations, delays and long queues at London airports as the airline suffered its third major computer failure in a little more than two years. BA, owned by International Airlines Group, apologised to customers for Wednesday's disruption and warned it would take time for operations to return to normal.

  • Nissan's Loveless Renault Marriage Is Laid Bare
    Bloomberg

    Nissan's Loveless Renault Marriage Is Laid Bare

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Even after a relationship is dead, couples often go through the motions of remaining in a marriage. That’s the best way to characterize what’s left of the alliance between Renault SA and Nissan Motor Co. Renault must sell down its 43.4% stake in its Japanese partner to 5%-10% and both sides should “invest in new ventures,” Nissan’s Senior Vice President Hari Nada wrote in an e-mail to colleagues, saying this was the view of independent director Masakazu Toyoda, the Wall Street Journal reported at the weekend. In Toyoda’s view, the two sides should come up with some sort of joint venture in order to show that the alliance isn’t dead, giving Renault Chairman Jean-Dominique Senard the room to unwind the cross-shareholdings that underpin the relationship, the Journal reported.To judge by the picture this paints of internal discussions within Nissan, the Japanese company is only interested in maintaining the appearance of an alliance with Renault and its 15% shareholder, the French government. Making a joint commitment to reaffirm a bond isn’t uncommon for people in a failing relationship, but it’s no way to run a business.If Nissan is sincerely committed to a joint venture, the first thing it should do is identify a strategic opportunity, work out what synergies it would bring, and find a way to operate it. Forming a JV just to get your partner to agree to the terms of a divorce puts your employees’ careers at the mercy of these corporate maneuverings.For those at Renault most committed to the logic of the merger with Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV that was declared dead in June, this might count as good news. Senard has publicly talked down the prospect of the tie-up being renewed, but this suggests that Renault has been looking for ways to revive the alliance behind the scenes.A tie-up between European giants, in the manner of the mergers that created Airbus SE, Air France-KLM, and IAG SA, seems a far more congenial outcome than the bitter remains of the Renault-Nissan marriage. Fiat Chrysler’s strong business in SUVs and North America would also complement one of the most obvious shortcomings that Renault would suffer if it lost its alliance with Nissan.At the same time, the writing is on the wall for any further integration between France and Japan. Nissan seems committed to preventing any further convergence. Whether or not a Potemkin village JV is agreed to, the sort of ambitious activities pushed in the Carlos Ghosn era – development of modular designs shared between Renault and Nissan vehicles, or moving the manufacturing of the Nissan Micra from the Japanese company’s Chennai plant to a Renault factory north of Paris – are unlikely to see the light of day again. The more likely outcome would be something eventually resembling the far more limited cooperation between Daimler AG and the alliance.Does it matter whether Renault and Nissan are married, or merely cohabiting? In many ways, the alliance has been dead since Ghosn and his deputy Greg Kelly were arrested by Japanese authorities last November. As my colleague Anjani Trivedi has written, Nissan in particular may be better off resolving its substantial problems on its own rather than getting involved in the complexity of another multi-billion dollar cross-border merger.Still, the risk for Nissan is that by turning away from its European partnership it will leave itself too small to manage the vast capital expenditures and research and development costs necessary as the global car industry seeks to reverse slumping sales and manage the transition to electric vehicles and greater automation. Ghosn’s pursuit of volume growth at any cost is one reason why Nissan is now plagued with overcapacity and facing drastic job cuts. But the vision he was pursuing before his arrest – of a company as transnational as he is, headquartered in the Netherlands and with operations all over the world, and not especially beholden to either the Japanese or French governments – is now unlikely ever to materialize.That’s a tragedy. A Renault-Nissan alliance free to pursue profitable growth in the interests of the business as a whole, rather than being turned into the plaything of nationalist interests, is the likeliest way for the two companies and their workforces to prosper. If management in Paris and Yokohama are quietly giving up on that future, both companies may live to regret it.A marriage where neither partner is committed is the worst of all worlds. If separation is out of the question, Nissan and Renault need to find a way to make this relationship work.To contact the author of this story: David Fickling at dfickling@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.David Fickling is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities, as well as industrial and consumer companies. He has been a reporter for Bloomberg News, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and the Guardian.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • What Should Investors Know About International Consolidated Airlines Group, S.A.'s (LON:IAG) Growth?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Should Investors Know About International Consolidated Airlines Group, S.A.'s (LON:IAG) Growth?

    Based on International Consolidated Airlines Group, S.A.'s (LON:IAG) earnings update on 30 June 2019, the consensus...

  • Pilots union in talks with British Airways over pay dispute
    Reuters

    Pilots union in talks with British Airways over pay dispute

    British Airways and the pilots agreed to continue talks next week, BALPA said, adding it would not announce any dates for industrial action at this time http://bit.ly/2OBiDNa. Pilots at British Airways voted for strike action on pay in early July, and the airline's bid to bring a High Court injunction to stop it failed.

  • British Airways Owner Rips Into Heathrow Airport Over ‘Outrageous’ Expansion Costs
    Skift

    British Airways Owner Rips Into Heathrow Airport Over ‘Outrageous’ Expansion Costs

    Willie Walsh, the CEO of Iberia and British Airways parent company IAG, has renewed his battle with Heathrow Airport over the “outrageous costs” associated with its plans for a third runway. Walsh has long been critical of the project and wants it stopped or at least done much cheaper. Of course, he isn't an objective […]The post British Airways Owner Rips Into Heathrow Airport Over 'Outrageous' Expansion Costs appeared first on Skift.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Asset managers: Less-liquid funds and growing risks

    STOXX 600 down 2.3% * Moves deepens worries about U.S.-China trade dispute * DAX down more than 3%, on track for worst day since December * Miners, cars and tech top fallers * BA gets lift-off after results Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Josephine Mason. Reach her on Messenger to share your thoughts on market moves: josephine.mason.thomsonreuters.com@reuters.net ASSET MANAGERS: LESS-LIQUID FUNDS AND GROWING RISKS (1422 GMT) Fund ratings at Woodford and Switzerland's GAM, and sudden redemptions in Natixis' H2O all highlight growing risks as investors are chasing yield in a low interest rate environment via less liquid assets, Morgan Stanley analysts write in a note today.

  • Tempted by the IAG share price and 7% yield? Here’s what you need to know
    Fool.co.uk

    Tempted by the IAG share price and 7% yield? Here’s what you need to know

    Is International Consolidated Airlines Group SA (LON: IAG) heading for a crash landing?

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 3-British Airways owner IAG's profit propelled by North American tailwind

    British Airways owner IAG gave an optimistic outlook on Friday as growing revenues in North America and an easing in fuel cost growth helped it exceed profit forecasts for the first half of its key summer period, lifting its shares. IAG Chief Executive Willie Walsh also said he "would like to hope" that British Airways could reach a deal with its pilots, who last month voted for strike action in a dispute over pay, although they have not yet served notice.

  • Bloomberg

    British Airways Parent Reports Rising Profit Amid Pilot Feud

    (Bloomberg) -- A pilot strike at British Airways is emerging as the biggest threat to earnings at parent IAG SA as lucrative long-haul destinations help insulate the group from the impact of falling prices on European routes.IAG rose as much as 4.7% after reporting an 18% jump in profit led by results at the former U.K. flag carrier. The performance was the best among Europe’s top airlines for the June quarter, but is in jeopardy from walkouts that could begin later this month at the height of Europe’s summer travel season.Chief Executive Officer Willie Walsh declined to comment on last-ditch labor negotiations due Friday after failing to get a U.K. court to outlaw the first strikes by pilots in four decades. A walkout at British Airways would crimp earnings that have helped offset the poorer performance of IAG units more vulnerable to a fare war in the region.IAG’s outlook for the rest of the year is surprisingly bullish in light of current uncertainties, Sanford C. Bernstein analyst Daniel Roeska said in a note. The British Airline Pilots’ Association, which will meet with BA managers at a conciliation service in London, could call a strike at two weeks’ notice at a cost of 40 million pounds ($48 million) a day, based on the carrier’s estimates.Pricing OptimismIAG stuck with guidance for full-year earnings in line with the 2018 pro forma figure at constant fuel prices and exchange rates. Second-quarter operating profit before items rose to 960 million euros ($1.1 billion), beating the analyst consensus. Walsh predicted pricing should improve in the second half and said the results show the value of a diversified portfolio that includes Spain’s Iberia, Dublin-based Aer Lingus and discount operators Vueling and Level. “Our assessment of both demand and supply is ok at the moment,” the CEO said. While the economic environment “is clearly softening,” a glut in seats that’s prompted a European fare war should ease as weaker competitors rein in capacity or exit the market, he predicted.Walsh said there’s no evidence concern about Brexit is putting people of flying, with U.K.-point-of-sale demand higher. He added that the company has preparations in place for a no-deal split, though there could still be an impact from any hit on the British economy. IAG shares traded 1.6% higher at 420.3 pence as of 9:41 a.m. in London, paring the stock’s decline this year to 27%.To contact the reporters on this story: Benjamin Katz in London at bkatz38@bloomberg.net;Simon Foy in London at sfoy8@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Anthony Palazzo at apalazzo@bloomberg.net, Christopher Jasper, Tara PatelFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 2-FTSE 100 endures worst day of 2019, Brexit worries hit RBS

    UK shares plunged to their lowest in a over a month on Friday after U.S. President Donald Trump threatened to hit China with more trade tariffs, while a Brexit-induced warning on targets knocked shares in Royal Bank of Scotland. The FTSE 100 index slumped 2.3% on its worst day fo far this year, while the FTSE 250 midcap index weakened by 1.7%.

  • IAG says it hopes to bring forward first MAX delivery to 2022
    Reuters

    IAG says it hopes to bring forward first MAX delivery to 2022

    British Airways owner IAG is in talks with Boeing to bring forward the first delivery of 200 737 MAX jets by a year to 2022, and said it was confident that the issues that led to its grounding would be addressed. IAG stunned industry executives at the Paris Airshow in June by signing a letter of intent to buy 200 737 MAX jets, with a plan for deliveries between 2023 and 2027. "We are having very constructive discussions with Boeing.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    CORRECTED-UPDATE 2-BA-owner IAG gains on profit rise, outlook despite strike threat

    British Airways owner IAG gave an optimistic outlook for the year, lifting its shares on Friday, as it exceeded profit forecasts for the first half of its key summer period with growing revenues and easing fuel cost growth.

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