JD - JD.com, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real-time price. Currency in USD
30.99
+0.41 (+1.34%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close30.58
Open30.81
Bid30.85 x 800
Ask31.00 x 2200
Day's range30.81 - 31.28
52-week range19.21 - 37.40
Volume8,153,818
Avg. volume14,271,231
Market cap51.961B
Beta (3Y monthly)1.41
PE ratio (TTM)210.82
EPS (TTM)0.15
Earnings date14 Aug 2019 - 19 Aug 2019
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target est33.38
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Is JD.com (JD) Stock Outpacing Its Retail-Wholesale Peers This Year?
    Zacks2 days ago

    Is JD.com (JD) Stock Outpacing Its Retail-Wholesale Peers This Year?

    Is (JD) Outperforming Other Retail-Wholesale Stocks This Year?

  • JD.com, Inc. (JD) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks3 days ago

    JD.com, Inc. (JD) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, JD.com, Inc. (JD) closed at $30.58, marking a -0.42% move from the previous day.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: China Life Insurance, Qudian, Hexindai, JD.com and China Eastern Airlines
    Zacks4 days ago

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: China Life Insurance, Qudian, Hexindai, JD.com and China Eastern Airlines

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: China Life Insurance, Qudian, Hexindai, JD.com and China Eastern Airlines

  • Just How Far Ahead Is Alibaba in China’s e-Commerce Market?
    Market Realist4 days ago

    Just How Far Ahead Is Alibaba in China’s e-Commerce Market?

    Alibaba (BABA) is known as the leading e-commerce company in China, but just how far ahead is it?

  • Can You Still Bet on China's Economy? 5 Picks
    Zacks5 days ago

    Can You Still Bet on China's Economy? 5 Picks

    Key economic indicators have improved and authorities are likely to initiate fresh stimulus measures

  • 6 Internet Stocks to Snap Up in 2H19 for a Winning Portfolio (Revised)
    Zacks5 days ago

    6 Internet Stocks to Snap Up in 2H19 for a Winning Portfolio (Revised)

    Here we pick six Internet stocks that present good investment opportunities through the second half of 2019.

  • China’s GDP Falls to 27-Year Low, Worst Yet to Come?
    Market Realist6 days ago

    China’s GDP Falls to 27-Year Low, Worst Yet to Come?

    China released its second-quarter GDP report today. The country’s GDP expanded 6.2% in the second quarter, marking its slowest growth since 1992.

  • JD.com, Inc. (JD) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks9 days ago

    JD.com, Inc. (JD) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know

    JD.com, Inc. (JD) closed at $31.08 in the latest trading session, marking a +1.87% move from the prior day.

  • Top Ranked Momentum Stocks to Buy for July 12th
    Zacks9 days ago

    Top Ranked Momentum Stocks to Buy for July 12th

    Top Ranked Momentum Stocks to Buy for July 12th

  • Overstock.com (OSTK) Jumps: Stock Rises 7.2%
    Zacks10 days ago

    Overstock.com (OSTK) Jumps: Stock Rises 7.2%

    Overstock.com (OSTK) saw a big move last session, as its shares jumped more than 7% on the day, amid huge volumes.

  • Tiger Global Fuels India Startup Boom With Dealmaking Spree
    Bloomberg10 days ago

    Tiger Global Fuels India Startup Boom With Dealmaking Spree

    (Bloomberg) -- Tiger Global Management has examined at least a dozen deals with Indian startups in recent months, according to multiple people with knowledge of the talks, illustrating global investors’ fierce interest in the country’s technology ecosystem.The ultra-secretive New York-based hedge fund has closed investments in at least half of these startups -- nearly all of them in fintech or enterprise software segments. Hedge funds, venture capital firms, and the likes of South Africa-headquartered internet group Naspers Ltd. are also chasing India’s rapidly growing consumer internet and enterprise software firms.The rising interest in India occurs as investment in China’s recently booming startup sector faces a steep drop-off. It’s a radical progression from just a few years ago when global investors worried about the prospects for India. Fewer smartphones and expensive wireless-data plans restricted internet access to a tiny user pool in a country of 1.3 billion people, pushing investors to chase the handful of entrepreneurs building consumer internet startups. Now cheap Chinese smartphones and inexpensive data rates offered by the aggressive telecom giant Reliance Jio Infocomm Ltd. and its rivals are luring millions of users online every month.There’s buoyancy also because India’s recent decisive election assured political stability, said venture capitalist Vani Kola, managing director at Kalaari Capital Advisors Pvt, prompting international funds to get back in the investment game. “Investors like Tiger Global are enthused that the market is stable and has reached a certain maturity,” she said. “There’s confidence in the depth of the market.”This year is already being dubbed Tiger Global India redux by some. The influential investor is renowned for its early bets on high-profile Indian consumer internet startups like Ola, and its triumphant exit last year from most-valuable Indian startup Flipkart, which netted a $3 billion return. In the first half of 2019, Tiger has already funded 13 Indian companies, according to researcher Tracxn Technologies Pvt, compared with 8 investments in 2018 and 6 the year before.The spigot remains open, according to the people, who didn’t want to be named as the deal signings are ongoing. On Thursday, supply chain software developer Moglix became the latest investment when the startup announced it had closed a $60 million financing round led by Tiger.Tiger’s new focus on enterprise software services coincides with management changes. Lee Fixel, the 39-year-old co-head of private equity for the technology-focused fund, recently departed the firm and Scott Shleifer, a partner, took over the portfolio. Schleifer, 41, best known for turning a $200 million investment in Chinese e-commerce platform JD.com Inc. into a $5 billion return, went on a whirlwind trip to India recently to meet entrepreneurs.The newest bets by the deep-pocketed hedge fund are mostly in the sub-$50 million range. They include logistics-management startup Locus, agritech provider Ninjacart, expense-management software provider Fyle, and Zenoti. All are spearheaded by Schleifer, the people said.India’s historical strength in IT services is also spawning thousands of software-as-a-service and business-to-business companies, a natural evolution given the expertise of the labor pool.“Investors are excited to see India’s transition from an IT services powerhouse to a rising B2B solutions hub,” said Sudheer Koneru, founder and chief executive officer of Zenoti, where Schleifer led a round of funding last month. Services can be virtually served on the cloud to customers anywhere in the world, making it viable to build SaaS startups in low-cost India.“Not just Tiger -- other global investors too are waking up to the exciting surge of B2B startups coming out of India,” said Koneru.Koneru’s Zenoti provides business and customer management and software services to beauty and wellness businesses, including spas, salons and gyms. Its 340 workers in the southern city of Hyderabad engineer the product, generate leads, and offer tech support to customers. After initially serving Indian businesses, nearly two thirds of Zenoti’s customers are in the U.S., and it’s doubling revenues year-on-year.Investments in Indian startups from other global names have also gathered pace in recent months. SoftBank Group Corp. and its Vision Fund, for instance, have invested in logistics provider Delhivery, and in Ola earlier this year, converting both into unicorns. India’s leading fintech startups are also in fund-raising mode.“Investors are finally seeing numbers, and the market is looking very very viable,” said Neha Singh, co-founder of researcher Tracxn.(Updates with latest deal announced in the sixth paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Saritha Rai in Bangalore at srai33@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, ;Tom Giles at tgiles5@bloomberg.net, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Default Isn't a Bad Word. Recovering $0, That's Scary
    Bloomberg11 days ago

    Default Isn't a Bad Word. Recovering $0, That's Scary

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Before being detained by police in Shanghai, Lo Ching was lauded as the new-age Hua Mulan, the legendary female Chinese warrior. Now the downfall of Lo, chairman of a Hong Kong-listed conglomerate, has become a parable of the dangers of investing in China. Noah Holdings Ltd., one of China’s largest wealth managers catering to high-net-worth individuals, is among the first to find out. The U.S.-listed asset manager has filed a lawsuit against Camsing International Holding Ltd. related to a 3.4 billion yuan ($490 million) credit product in danger of default, according to a filing this week.  The word default, itself, isn’t so scary. After all, evaluating the risk that an obligation won’t be paid is what credit investors do every day. Nor is Camsing’s credit product all that unusual: The underlying assets are account receivables the company expects from China’s top-tier retailers, JD.com Inc. and Suning.com Co.Formal financing channels – such as bank loans, corporate bonds or exchange-traded asset-backed securities – aren’t readily available to smaller private enterprises in China. So while the likes of Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. can regularly issue account receivables-backed securities, small businesses often use their working capital as collateral for loans from asset managers. In the case of Camsing, Lo pledged her 62% stake in the company to Noah. The worrying part about all this is whether any money can be clawed back. JD.com and Suning said they don’t owe Noah the 3.4 billion yuan: “Camsing falsified JD.com’s business contracts,” a JD.com spokeswoman told Bloomberg News. Camsing held 5.7 billion yuan in account receivables, 74.4% from Suning and 23.2% from JD.com at the end of 2018, Caixin reported, citing Camsing financial documents the financial news site said it had seen.As for those shares Lo pledged, they’re hardly worth anything now. Camsing’s stock crashed 80.4% on Monday after news of Lo’s detainment broke. That 62% stake is worth just HK$340 million ($43.5 million) now.Noah can file as many lawsuits as it wants; the truth is its path to recovery doesn’t look good. Data on these types of shadow-credit products are slim, but reviewing defaults of exchange-traded corporate bonds, China Inc. has a lousy track record. Among the 128 issuers that have defaulted on their bond obligations since 2014, only 28 have paid back investors in full. Of the total 216 billion yuan in missed bond payments, only 31 billion yuan, or 14.5%, has been repaid, according to HSBC Holdings Plc. Private enterprises are the worst offenders. Of the 17 state-owned enterprises that have defaulted, 41% have paid investors back,  according to HSBC. By comparison, just 19% of the 111 private business that defaulted repaid creditors.As I argued last week, when it comes to private businesses, no one will come to rescue lenders and minority shareholders if things go sour. While cash-strapped local governments rarely pump their fiscal dollars into failing state enterprises these days, none of them wants to see a local champion fail. Somehow municipalities will wring money from bailout funds, strategic investors or even local banks to save struggling businesses. I’d love to laud the animal spirits of China’s private enterprises, but recent waves of corporate-governance scandals – from missing cash to potentially falsified business documents – are scaring investors. If you’re into stocks, by all means go with your heart. If you’re a credit investor, use your head instead.To contact the author of this story: Shuli Ren at sren38@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Rachel Rosenthal at rrosenthal21@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Shuli Ren is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Asian markets. She previously wrote on markets for Barron's, following a career as an investment banker, and is a CFA charterholder.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Go-Jek Snags Investment From Thailand's Largest Lender
    Bloomberg11 days ago

    Go-Jek Snags Investment From Thailand's Largest Lender

    (Bloomberg) -- Ride-hailing giant Go-Jek has secured an investment from Siam Commercial Bank Pcl, the Thai lender that counts King Maha Vajiralongkorn as its biggest shareholder, according to people familiar with the matter.It’s unclear how much Thailand’s biggest bank is investing in Go-Jek, the people said, who asked not to be identified because the matter is private. Their partnership will help Indonesia’s most valuable technology startup bolster its financial services, while Siam Commercial is counting on online growth to help increase revenue, they added.Southeast Asia’s banks are increasingly teaming up with technology firms that are getting onto their turf, offering financial services from digital payments to consumer loans. Thailand’s Kasikornbank Pcl has invested $50 million in Go-Jek’s rival, Grab, and the pair intend to establish a co-branded mobile wallet.Established over a century ago by royal charter, Siam Commercial Bank is Thailand’s oldest homegrown lender. It’s the latest to join Go-Jek’s ongoing series-F round, a term denoting late-stage financing.The startup has already raised over $1 billion as of the round’s first close, Bloomberg reported in February. Alphabet Inc.’s Google, JD.com Inc. and Tencent Holdings Ltd. invested alongside Provident Capital. This week, Go-Jek announced additional investment from Mitsubishi Motors Corp., Mitsubishi Corp. and Mitsubishi UFJ Lease & Finance Co. as part of the series F financing.Go-Jek, which debuted its app for hailing motorbike taxis in Jakarta in 2015, is expanding beyond Indonesia to cater to consumers across Southeast Asia, aiming to popularize an all-purpose consumer app similar to Tencent’s WeChat in China. It is valued at $10 billion according to CB Insights, and hosts more than 20 on-demand services on its platform from food delivery to cab-hailing.Representatives of the bank and Go-Jek declined to comment.To contact the reporters on this story: Yoolim Lee in Singapore at yoolim@bloomberg.net;Anuchit Nguyen in Bangkok at anguyen@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Divya Balji at dbalji1@bloomberg.net, ;Tom Giles at tgiles5@bloomberg.net, Edwin Chan, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Trade Truce Party Never Started, Asian Indexes Fall Again
    Market Realist12 days ago

    Trade Truce Party Never Started, Asian Indexes Fall Again

    On Monday, major China-focused ETFs ended deep in the red on US exchanges. The iShares MSCI China ETF (MCHI) lost 1.24%.

  • Chinese Wealth Manager Claims $490 Million Fraud Behind Missed Repayments
    Bloomberg12 days ago

    Chinese Wealth Manager Claims $490 Million Fraud Behind Missed Repayments

    (Bloomberg) -- Noah Holdings Ltd., one of China’s largest wealth managers, levied accusations of fraud against Camsing International Holding Ltd., the Hong Kong-listed company that said last week its chairman had been detained by police.The asset manager has filed a lawsuit and reported Camsing to regulators in relation to a 3.4 billion yuan ($490 million) asset management product that’s in danger of default, Wang Jingbo, Noah’s chief executive officer and co-founder, said in an internal memo on Monday that was obtained by Bloomberg News. The product’s duration will be extended by as much as one year to ensure repayment, Wang said in the memo, the contents of which were confirmed by a spokeswoman.Camsing, a conglomerate with businesses spanning entertainment and health care, saw its stock plunge 80% in Hong Kong on Monday after the company said Chairman Lo Ching was being held in criminal custody by the Shanghai police. Noah’s shares fell 20% in New York after it said some credit funds managed by one of its affiliates provided “supply chain financing involving third-party companies related to Camsing.”A representative who answered the phone at Camsing’s office in Hong Kong declined to comment. The stock fell another 27% on Tuesday.Chinese investors have seen a slew of recent frauds involving listed companies, including false financial reporting by drugmaker Kangmei Pharmaceutical Co. and fake profits at laminating-film maker Kangde Xin Composite Material Group Co. The incidents are adding to an already stressed credit market: Bonds from at least 56 Chinese companies totaling $40 billion face repayment pressure, according to company and ratings firm statements compiled by Bloomberg.The incident “could significantly hit investor confidence, especially given current high macro-economic uncertainty and low risk appetite among clients,” Citigroup Inc. analysts led by Daphne Poon wrote in a note published on Tuesday.The underlying assets of the product are backed by accounts payable from Beijing JD Century Trade Holdings Ltd. to Camsing, Wang said in the Noah memo. In a statement on Tuesday, JD.com, JD Century Trade’s parent, denied any involvement.“Camsing falsified JD.com’s business contracts, engaging in fraudulent behavior,” a spokeswoman said by email. “We are shocked that this occurred and have been cooperating with the police on this issue.”In a statement on Tuesday, Noah said it had also sued JD.com, the online marketplace operator that Noah said had a longstanding relationship with Camsing. In response, JD.com said the lawsuit was “unmerited” and “severely impacted” its reputation.Citi’s analysts said that downward pressure on the economy could have contributed to the alleged fraud at Camsing. The company has worked with Noah for three years and previously had a good track-record, they said, with more than 6 billion yuan of asset management products having matured and been paid back.Shanghai-based Noah, which directly managed about $25 billion in assets at the end of March, has obtained additional shares of Camsing and its affiliates as collateral, Wang said in the memo. A Chinese court has frozen Camsing’s stock and bank accounts, she said, without providing more details.(Adds additional comments ninth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Zheping Huang.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Evelyn Yu in Shanghai at yyu263@bloomberg.net;Jun Luo in Shanghai at jluo6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sam Mamudi at smamudi@bloomberg.net, Charlie ZhuFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg12 days ago

    Former Kleiner Partner Is Said to Seek $250 Million in Funding

    (Bloomberg) -- China Creation Ventures, an investment outfit founded by former Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers partner Zhou Wei, is seeking to raise about $250 million in funding, according to people familiar with the matter.CCV, which was founded in 2017, is planning to raise a second U.S.-dollar fund to focus on early-stage Chinese startups, the people said, requesting not to be named because the matter is private. Yu Yi, a spokeswoman for CCV, declined to comment in a text statement.Zhou counts e-commerce giant JD.com Inc., online podcast and radio service Ximalaya and internet finance platform Creditease among his investments. His venture capital firm, founded together with a team of former KPCB portfolio managers, is mustering more ammunition at a time Chinese startups have struggled to attract backing.Chinese capital-raising is slowing after a five-year surge in VC activity, in part because risk-averse institutions gravitate toward top-tier investment targets while an escalating trade war depresses the world’s No. 2 economy. The value of investments in the country tumbled 77% to $9.4 billion in the second quarter from a year earlier, according to market research firm Preqin.CCV has deployed about-two thirds of its first U.S. dollar fund, which pooled about $200 million. About 90% of those deals were series A investments -- typically the first significant round of venture capital funding -- where it held a board seat, according to a company statement. The firm also operates a 1.5 billion yuan ($218 million) local-currency fund, giving it a total of roughly $400 million of assets under management. With a focus on China and Southeast Asia, CCV has four portfolio companies that are seeking a public offering before the end of 2020, the company said.To contact the reporter on this story: Lulu Yilun Chen in Hong Kong at ychen447@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tom Giles at tgiles5@bloomberg.net, Edwin Chan, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • China's Venture Capital Boom Shows Signs of Turning Into a Bust
    Bloomberg13 days ago

    China's Venture Capital Boom Shows Signs of Turning Into a Bust

    (Bloomberg) -- China went through a five-year surge in venture capital investment that fostered a new generation of startups from ride-hailing giant Didi Chuxing to TikTok-parent Bytedance Ltd. Now the boom may be over.Venture deals in China plummeted in the second quarter as investors pulled back amid unpredictable trade talks and growing concerns about startup valuations. The value of investments in the country tumbled 77% to $9.4 billion in the second quarter from a year earlier, while the number of deals roughly halved to 692, according to the market research firm Preqin.The second quarter of 2018 marked the peak for China venture deals with a total of $41.3 billion invested. That included a $14 billion round for digital payments giant Ant Financial, $3 billion for e-commerce upstart Pinduoduo Inc. and $1.9 billion for truck-sharing service Manbang Group (known also as Full Truck Alliance Group). By comparison, the largest venture deal in the second quarter of 2019 was a $1 billion investment in JD Health, the health care affiliate of e-commerce provider JD.com Inc.China has never been through a widespread bust like the U.S. did after the dotcom boom, in part because the country’s venture market is so new. Years of steady growth in tech investments resulted in predictable -- and enormous -- profits. Whether the current downturn becomes a painful crash depends in large part on how VCs, entrepreneurs and regulators navigate terrain they’ve never seen before.“We’re seeing real stress in the system for the first time,” said Gary Rieschel, a founding partner at Qiming Venture Partners who has worked in China and the U.S. “We have never seen a downturn in the China market. For 20 years, it’s been pretty much up and to the right.”China’s venture boom began in 2014 when Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. went public in the largest-ever initial public offering, making clear to investors the potential riches in the world’s most populous country. Venture deals tripled that year to more than $17 billion and proceeded to rise every year through 2018 when the total topped $105 billion, almost as much as in the U.S.Along the way, firms like Qiming, Sequoia China, Tiger Global Management and SoftBank Group Corp. fostered some of the most valuable startups in the world. Bytedance, the force behind short-video app TikTok and other addictive services, sports a valuation of $75 billion, the highest anywhere according to CB Insights. Didi, the ride-hailing service that ousted Uber Technologies Inc. from China, was last valued at $56 billion, the second highest.But the rise of China’s tech industry put it squarely in the crossfire of the trade war. The Trump administration has accused China of stealing intellectual property and unfairly subsidizing companies in strategic fields, including semiconductors, artificial intelligence and autonomous driving. In May, the U.S. blacklisted Huawei Technologies Co., preventing the telecom giant from buying American components, and is considering doing the same to a swath of startups.The trade war gives investors one more reason for caution. Valuations had already grown vertiginous. High-profile startups such as smartphone-maker Xiaomi Corp. and delivery giant Meituan Dianping saw their stocks tumble after they went public, reinforcing the impression that private-market valuations had gotten out of hand.So-called sharing economy startups have also tested the patience of their investors. Companies like Didi, Meituan and bike-sharing provider Ofo blitzed the market with heavy subsidies to grab market share from rivals, making up for their losses with venture money. Now there’s skepticism that many such companies will ever turn a profit.“You’re really reaching the end of the shared economy -- this idea of let’s give away services for free and make up for it in volume,” Rieschel said. “Some companies -- Didi is the classic case -- are just not showing any ability to become profitable.”A Didi representative didn’t respond to a message and email seeking comment.Valuations haven’t declined yet in China though. The country’s startups have resisted so-called down rounds, when they raise money at lower valuations than an earlier round. “China entrepreneurs, more than any on the planet, will do unnatural things to avoid a down round,” Rieschel said.Meanwhile, venture firms are pivoting to alternative business models, like enterprise software. Such startups are not only less capital intensive, they are at a stage of development where they require less money.This also may simply be a time when venture investors opt for caution. Given the volatile negotiations between Donald Trump and Xi Jinping, it’s not clear what kind of opportunities China’s tech startups will face in the years ahead or how capital markets will treat the next big IPO filing.“It won’t cost you that much to sit on your hands for a few months,” Rieschel said.\--With assistance from Lulu Yilun Chen.To contact the reporter on this story: Peter Elstrom in Tokyo at pelstrom@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Edwin Chan, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Nope, Pinduoduo Isn't a Bigger E-Commerce Player Than JD.com
    Motley Fool14 days ago

    Nope, Pinduoduo Isn't a Bigger E-Commerce Player Than JD.com

    The Chinese e-commerce newcomer has more shoppers than JD, but it’s making a lot less money.

  • Why JD.com Stock Soared 17.6% in June
    Motley Fool15 days ago

    Why JD.com Stock Soared 17.6% in June

    A banner annual sale and broader market gains helped the Chinese e-commerce site rebound.

  • 6 Internet Stocks to Snap Up in 2H19 for a Winning Portfolio
    Zacks16 days ago

    6 Internet Stocks to Snap Up in 2H19 for a Winning Portfolio

    Here we pick six Internet stocks that present good investment opportunities through the second half of 2019.

  • $2 Billion Firm Doubles Down on Chinese Tech Investments
    Bloomberg19 days ago

    $2 Billion Firm Doubles Down on Chinese Tech Investments

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up for Next China, a weekly email on where the nation stands now and where it's going next.One tech-focused investor is putting money to work at a record pace as trade tensions and economic-slowdown concerns deflate lofty valuations.All-Stars Investment Ltd. has invested, or increased its stake, in six privately held Chinese technology companies over the past year, seizing on cheaper valuations, Hong Kong-based Chief Investment Officer Richard Ji said. That’s “double or triple” the number of private deals it strikes in a typical year, he said.As China and the U.S. engage in a stop-go trade spat, slowing economic growth in Asia’s biggest economy is damping investor appetite for listed giants such as Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. and Tencent Holdings Ltd., as well as their unlisted peers. The country’s vaunted tech sector is undergoing a period of pain as companies including JD.com Inc. lay off staff and trim costs, while startup investment fizzles.Against that backdrop, Ji sees an opportunity.“The macroeconomic overhang is the worst we’ve seen in 10 years,” he said. “The market has become more rational, and that’s helpful for value investors like us.”Forecast valuations for unlisted Chinese tech firms that plan to go public within three years have dropped at least 20% to 30% versus a year to 18 months ago, Ji said. There have been isolated cases of sharper declines of as much as 50%, he added.All-Stars is targeting firms that can sustain robust growth throughout an economic cycle by helping customers cut costs, improve efficiencies and innovate, Ji, a former head of Asia internet and media research at Morgan Stanley, said.New-Economy ChampionsHong Kong-based All-Stars manages almost $2 billion in hedge and private equity funds that focus on “new-economy champions” in China. The majority is in private equity, including $600 million the group closed in January for a seven-year fund. Unlike early-stage venture capital investors, All-Stars’ private-equity investments focus on more mature companies that are close to public share sales.All-Stars’ new investments include artificial intelligence outfit SenseTime Group Ltd., online financing company Lufax, co-working firm Ucommune and WeDoctor. It added to its investments in Tujia.com, a Chinese rival to Airbnb Inc., and Full Truck Alliance Group, China’s largest truck-sharing platform, Ji said.Besides cheaper valuations, muted sentiment has made it easier to negotiate terms that are more favorable to investors, he said. Having deployed a majority of the money in the $600 million fund, All-Stars plans to tap investors for another private-equity fund in the second half, he said.To contact the reporter on this story: Bei Hu in Hong Kong at bhu5@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Katrina Nicholas at knicholas2@bloomberg.net, Peter VercoeFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • JD.com Shares Gained Almost 18.0% in June
    Market Realist19 days ago

    JD.com Shares Gained Almost 18.0% in June

    JD.com stock is trading at $31.19 per share, which is 62.4% above its 52-week low of $31.19 and 22.0% below its 52-week high of $40.04.

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