JD - JD.com, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real-time price. Currency in USD
38.84
-0.53 (-1.35%)
At close: 4:00PM EST

38.82 -0.02 (-0.04%)
After hours: 5:35PM EST

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close39.37
Open40.00
Bid38.83 x 3100
Ask39.08 x 4000
Day's range38.40 - 40.35
52-week range25.48 - 43.09
Volume14,384,167
Avg. volume11,342,845
Market cap56.713B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.40
PE ratio (TTM)264.22
EPS (TTM)0.15
Earnings date01 Mar 2020
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target est298.37
  • Coronavirus' biggest winners: Tech providers in China, Hong Kong
    Yahoo Finance

    Coronavirus' biggest winners: Tech providers in China, Hong Kong

    The coronavirus outbreak is roiling China, but some startup technology companies are actually benefitting as isolated citizens flock to a range of solutions to achieve a sense of normalcy.

  • Bloomberg

    Alibaba’s China Disconnect Cuts Hong Kong Dead

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The decision to exclude shares of China's biggest e-commerce company from a cross-border trading link is a blow to Hong Kong. Is it a punishment, or simple self-interest at work? The answer matters, both for the city’s exchange and for Alibaba Group Holding Ltd.Alibaba can’t be included in the stock connect program linking Hong Kong with the Shanghai and Shenzhen exchanges at present, Bloomberg News reported Tuesday, citing people familiar with the matter. China’s securities regulator has yet to agree to rule changes proposed by Hong Kong Stock Exchanges & Clearing Ltd. that would allow the internet company to participate, one of the people was cited as saying.Granted, the Jack Ma-founded internet giant doesn’t qualify under the stock connect program’s existing arrangements, which exclude companies that have secondary listings with weighted voting rights. These were already in place before New York-listed Alibaba raised $13 billion selling shares in Hong Kong late last year.But exceptions have already been made. In October, China allowed companies with dual-class shares to join the connect, giving investors in the mainland access to Hong Kong-listed technology companies Xiaomi Corp. and Meituan Dianping. Rules can be changed when there is the desire to do so.Clearly, that was the expectation among investors here. The notice on dual-class shares was posted by the Shanghai and Shenzhen exchanges in mid-October and took effect Oct. 28. Three days later, Alibaba was reported to be planning its secondary listing in Hong Kong the following month. The shares started trading Nov. 26.Investors in Alibaba’s Hong Kong stock will have a right to feel short-changed if the shares lose steam as a result. They dropped as much as 2.5% after the Bloomberg News story published, before recovering to close little changed. Alibaba has rallied more than 20% since its debut in Hong Kong, at least partly on anticipation that the stock will draw a wall of money from mainland Chinese investors who wouldn’t otherwise be able to buy.The lack of support for Alibaba to join the stock connect is a severe blow to Hong Kong’s aspirations of marketing itself as the offshore listing venue of choice for Chinese technology companies, in an environment where the U.S. has become increasingly inhospitable and businesses are considering their options. Trip.com Group Ltd. and Netease Inc. are among U.S.-listed Chinese enterprises that are said to be looking at listing in Hong Kong. Bankers have talked of pitching other names including JD.com Inc. and Baidu Inc.The prospect of acquiring an enthusiastic mainland investor base that would help to buoy valuations is a key selling point for those who might be tempted to decamp from a U.S. exchange. If Alibaba — a marquee name with a $578 billion market capitalization — can’t get the nod, what’s the hope for any of the others?More worrying for Hong Kong is what the reluctance may say about China’s support for the city, as it contemplates the hit to its own economy from the coronavirus epidemic. HKEX, after all, is a competitor as well as a partner with the Shanghai and Shenzhen exchanges. If Hong Kong becomes too attractive a venue for China’s leading companies, that may hold back development of the mainland’s markets.In 2018, Hong Kong relaxed its listing rules to admit unprofitable technology companies, competing with the U.S. and making the exchange even more alluring to Chinese hopefuls than the Shanghai and Shenzhen markets. In turn, Shanghai introduced the tech-focused Star Board in July, a Chinese answer to the Nasdaq that accepts money-losing companies with weighted voting rights. After a lively start, the board’s performance has been underwhelming. It has drawn few big names and has thin turnover.All may not be lost. Smartphone maker Xiaomi had been public in Hong Kong for 15 months before it joined the connect, while food-delivery app Meituan had to wait 13 months. HKEX and Alibaba will have to hope this is the slow arm of bureaucracy rather than the cold shoulder. To contact the author of this story: Nisha Gopalan at ngopalan3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Nisha Gopalan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and banking. She previously worked for the Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones as an editor and a reporter.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Alibaba Blocked From Hong Kong Stock Link to China

    (Bloomberg) -- Investors betting on Alibaba Group Holding Ltd.’s inclusion in a program allowing mainland Chinese investors to buy its shares in Hong Kong could be in for a disappointment.China’s largest e-commerce company, valued at HK$4.56 trillion ($587 billion) in Hong Kong, can’t be included in the stock connect program linking the Asian financial hub with Chinese investors at present, according to people with knowledge of the matter, who asked not to be identified as the discussions are private.The exclusion of companies with secondary listings and weighted voting rights from the program was part of an arrangement agreed to by the mainland and Hong Kong exchanges before Alibaba’s Hong Kong debut last year, the people said. The Shanghai, Shenzhen and Hong Kong exchanges haven’t agreed to make an exception or revise the agreement for Alibaba, though that could change in the future, they said.With the bourses competing to draw the listings of local firms already floated in the U.S., allowing companies in Alibaba’s position into the program would run contrary to Beijing’s ambitions of developing its mainland exchanges, particularly as unrest grips Hong Kong. Other Chinese firms -- among the country’s largest corporations, from JD.com Inc. to Baidu Inc. -- may then be encouraged to also pick Hong Kong, bypassing the Shanghai or Shenzhen bourses.The Hong Kong Stock Exchanges & Clearing Ltd. has proposed changes to the China Securities Regulatory Commission, which hasn’t yet made a decision to revise the previous arrangement, one of the people said.Companies with weighted voting rights and a secondary listing are not currently included in the stock connect and there’s been no precedent for such a move, a Hong Kong Exchange spokesman said in response to questions on the agreement. “We look forward to discussing the potential for this with relevant parties in the future,” he said. “More generally, HKEX is not in the habit of banning things that it considers positive for the market.”Alibaba is not among the current batch of companies to be included in the stock connect, said a separate person, adding that the list will be updated on Feb. 17.Representatives for Alibaba and the Shanghai Stock Exchange declined to comment. Shenzhen Stock Exchange and China’s stock market watchdog, the China Securities Regulatory Commission, didn’t immediately reply to emails seeking comment.Alibaba’s landmark $13 billion secondary listing in Hong Kong last year was in part spurred by expectations that it would attract a vast pool of capital from its home country if included in the stock connect.In the Hong Kong offering, Alibaba preserved its governance structure: Granting a partnership of top executives the right to nominate a majority of board members. That system falls broadly into the definition of having weighted voting rights in Hong Kong.Alibaba’s shares are up about 20% since the November listing, prompting other U.S.-listed technology companies including Trip.com to look at a secondary listing in Hong Kong, people familiar have said. Alibaba fell as much as 2.5% in Hong Kong Tuesday, the biggest drop in two weeks, before paring losses. In the past, China has green-lit companies with weighted voting rights that conducted primary share sales in Hong Kong to join the stock connect program. For example, food delivery giant Meituan Dianping and smartphone maker Xiaomi Corp. joined in late October. Chinese firms with dual class shares started listing in July on Shanghai’s new tech-focused Star board.(Updates with shares)\--With assistance from Kiuyan Wong and Lucille Liu.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Evelyn Yu in Shanghai at yyu263@bloomberg.net;Lulu Yilun Chen in Hong Kong at ychen447@bloomberg.net;Steven Yang in Beijing at kyang74@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Candice Zachariahs at czachariahs2@bloomberg.net, Jonas Bergman, David ScanlanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Coronavirus Outbreak Drives Demand for China’s Online Grocers
    Bloomberg

    Coronavirus Outbreak Drives Demand for China’s Online Grocers

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up for Next China, a weekly email on where the nation stands now and where it's going next.Like their counterparts in Silicon Valley, China’s largest tech companies struggled to prove online groceries can be a viable business. Then the novel coronavirus struck.Its spread has extended a lifeline to a slew of money-burning businesses -- many backed by big name venture capital funds and tech giants from Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. to Tencent Holdings Ltd. -- that in some cases were on the brink of collapse in 2019. Millions of consumers shunning supermarkets and meal-delivery services are testing promises by Tencent-backed Missfresh or Alibaba’s nationwide Hema chain to ship fresh food to their doorsteps. Those that deliver can expect many of first-time customers to stay even after the epidemic burns itself out.The boom is one more way in which the abrupt onset of the epidemic is transforming consumer behavior in the world’s No. 2 economy. Usage of other online services from mobile gaming to internet malls is surging as the epidemic confines millions to their homes.“Before the Chinese New Year, many of these firms were looking precarious and their only lifeline was the deep pockets of their big backers,” said Michael Norris, research and strategy manager at Shanghai-based consultancy AgencyChina. “Right now, fresh grocery delivery platforms are seen as an essential for consumers to minimize risk of infection.”Not all of them are equipped to handle the sudden increase in demand. The most immediate obstacles include a shortage of delivery staff, inventory management and the difficulties of navigating physical roadblocks put up by local governments trying to curb the disease’s spread. And if the coronavirus outbreak hurts the economy, expect that also to squeeze funding overall for all tech startups.The epidemic has led consumers to seek eating options that are healthier than takeout, especially with online chatter about the risks of take-out delivery people transmitting the disease. There’s less of a concern around fresh food since delivery frequency is lower than takeout and many people take comfort in cooking their own meals.Norris sees the outbreak ushering in another boom era for e-commerce in China. Overall, he expects online to account for a third of China’s retail sales in 2020, up from around a quarter last year.Alibaba’s Hema chain, including 18 stores at the epicenter of the outbreak in Wuhan, have operated non-stop during the extended Lunar New Year break. Online orders have spiked, prompting Hema to increase its vegetable supply across Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou, the company said in a statement.Missfresh saw a quadrupling in online orders for groceries during the first five days of the Lunar New Year compared with the same time last year. The company sold 40 million food items including eggs, lettuce and beef during the seven-day period. And JD.com Inc. said its sales of fresh food increased by 215%, reaching almost 15,000 tons during the 10-day period ending Feb. 2, compared with the same period last year.Twenty-one-year-old Ye Xie would ordinarily be back at Fudan University in Shanghai by now, starting her last semester. But because of the epidemic, she’s stuck in her native Zhejiang province and her family has come to depend on the app Dingdong Buy Vegetables. “Before the outbreak, they would average once a week,” she said. “Now we use it three to four times a week.”It’s an unexpected windfall for grocery delivery services that have perennially struggled with the logistics of transporting perishables like fruit and vegetables and shoppers’ innate preference for testing and selecting the freshest produce on sight. That’s good news for a sector that faces a broader funding squeeze. Last year, a raft of startups raced to replenish their war chests before what many foresaw as a capital winter brought on by a slowing economy. Missfresh was said to be seeking a new round of fundraising last July at a $3 billion valuation. The company hasn’t announced completion of that financing.“The spike in online grocery demand presents an education opportunity,” said Snow Hua, managing partner of Cherubic Ventures, which has also invested in online grocery startups like China Fresh. “Long-term though, investors will still be looking at fundamentals like whether this business model is sustainable and which companies have a better supply chain, storage and delivery system.”For some, the boost may have come too late. Dingdong, backed by Sequoia and Qiming Ventures, halted expansion in certain regions last year amid setbacks in operation, Caijing reported. Dingdong discontinued all their services in Xie’s hometown of Ningbo as of Feb. 7. The suspension was to help combat the epidemic, a spokeswoman for the company said, adding that it’s fully operational in other cities including Shanghai, Hangzhou and Shenzhen.Signs of strain are also emerging. Missfresh manager Liu Guofeng said that, during the first week of the Lunar New Year holiday, its vegetable supply ran out every day around 4 p.m., whereas it would normally take three to four days to deplete. Users rush to place orders before midnight every day when the company replenishes its stock.It’s also tried to court drivers working for meal delivery services Meituan and Ele.me, doubling the payout for riders per order from Feb. 1 to Feb. 8 and handing out 1,000 yuan ($143) in subsidies if they work eight days straight. “There’s a huge shortage on deliverymen,” said Liu. “Also a lot of villages are blocking the roads so not many people have been able to return to work.” To address labor shortages, Hema has agreed to hire staff from Chinese restaurants now that dining out has plummeted.Delivery times too have elongated. Requests that used to take 30 minutes to deliver can now need half a day to arrive, Xie said.Yet once the chaff is weeded out, the remaining players will end up with a far more established and loyal customer base. The current crisis has forced customers to turn online and at least some will remain active buyers, while surviving startups will have had the chance to hone their infrastructure and offerings.“Even though the virus outbreak brings a lot of challenges, it will also create opportunities for these online grocery startups,” said Richard Peng, founder of Genesis Capital, a Missfresh backer. “It’s fundamentally changing user habits, as they open up to the idea of buying groceries online.”\--With assistance from Colum Murphy.To contact the reporters on this story: Lulu Yilun Chen in Hong Kong at ychen447@bloomberg.net;Kari Lindberg in Hong Kong at klindberg13@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alibaba, JD.com, Starbucks and Apple
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alibaba, JD.com, Starbucks and Apple

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alibaba, JD.com, Starbucks and Apple

  • Bloomberg

    Virus Pushes Robots to the Frontlines of Hospitals

    (Bloomberg) -- Sign up for Next China, a weekly email on where the nation stands now and where it's going next.The deadly coronavirus outbreak, which has pushed the Chinese medical community into overdrive, has also prompted the country’s hospitals to more quickly adopt robots as medical assistants.Telepresence bots that allow remote video communication, patient health monitoring and safe delivery of medical goods are growing in number on hospital floors in urban China. They’re now acting as a safe go-between that helps curb the spread of the coronavirus.Keenon Robotics Co., a Shanghai-based company, deployed 16 robots of a model nicknamed “little peanut” to a hospital in Hangzhou after a group of Wuhan travelers to Singapore were held in quarantine. Siasun Robot and Automation Co. donated seven medical robots and 14 catering service robots to the Shenyang Red Cross to help hospitals combat the virus on Wednesday, according to a media release on the company’s website. Keenon and Siasun didn’t reply immediately to requests for comment. JD.com Inc. is testing the use of autonomous delivery robots in Wuhan, the company said in a statement. Local media has also reported robots being used in hospitals in the city as well as in Guangzhou, Jiangxi, Chengdu, Beijing, Shanghai, and Tianjin.The rapid spread of the coronavirus has left provincial hospitals straining to cope and helped accelerate the embrace of robots as one solution, turning the gadgets into medical assistants. These bots join China’s tech-heavy response to the coronavirus outbreak, which also includes airborne drones and work-from-home apps. The jury remains out on how effective these coping tactics will be.China’s rapid buildout of fifth-generation wireless networking in areas around urban hospitals has also seen a rise in 5G-powered medical robots -- equipped with cameras that allow remote video communication and patient monitoring. These are in contrast to robots like little peanut, whose primary function is to make indoor deliveries.“The technology of robots used in Chinese hospitals isn’t high, but what this virus is also highlighting -- and it could be the next stage of Chinese robots -- is the use of medical robot deployment,” said Bloomberg Intelligence analyst Nikkie Lu.China Mobile Ltd. donated one 5G robot each to both Wuhan Union Hospital and Tongji Tianyou Hospital this week, according to a report by ThePaper.cn. Riding the 5G network, these assistant bots carry a disinfectant tank on board and will be used to safely clean hospital areas along a predetermined route, reducing the risk to medical personnel.Zhejiang People’s Hospital used a 5G robot to diagnose its first coronavirus patient on Sunday, according to a report by the Hangzhou news center run by the State Council Information Office. Beijing Jishuitan Hospital performed remote surgery on a patient in Shandong province via China Telecom Corp.’s 5G network last June.While it may take patients a moment or two to get over the shock of being helped by a robot rather than a medical professional, bots have already permeated a growing number of sectors in Chinese society including nursing homes, restaurants, warehouses, banks and over 200 kindergartens.Financial services company Huachuang Securities Co. believes even more robots are in China’s immediate future. Pointing to National Bureau of Statistics data suggesting that domestic production of industrial robots increased by 15.3% in the month of December, they predict similarly fast growth in the current quarter, according to a report published by Finance Sina.The increased quantity of robots deployed to combat the coronavirus has helped accelerate China’s path to the goal it had already set for itself. The country wants to become one of the world’s top 10 most intensively automated nations by the end of this year.To contact the reporter on this story: Kari Lindberg in Hong Kong at klindberg13@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Vlad Savov, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • JD.com, Inc. (JD) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    JD.com, Inc. (JD) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, JD.com, Inc. (JD) closed at $39.94, marking a -1.02% move from the previous day.

  • Is JD.com, Inc. (NASDAQ:JD) Expensive For A Reason? A Look At Its Intrinsic Value
    Simply Wall St.

    Is JD.com, Inc. (NASDAQ:JD) Expensive For A Reason? A Look At Its Intrinsic Value

    In this article we are going to estimate the intrinsic value of JD.com, Inc. (NASDAQ:JD) by taking the expected future...

  • JD.com, Inc. (JD) Gains As Market Dips: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    JD.com, Inc. (JD) Gains As Market Dips: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, JD.com, Inc. (JD) closed at $39.14, marking a +0.59% move from the previous day.

  • New Strong Sell Stocks for January 23rd
    Zacks

    New Strong Sell Stocks for January 23rd

    Here are 3 stocks added to the Zacks Rank 5 (Strong Sell) List today

  • Hong Kong Risks Squandering Its Alibaba Dividend
    Bloomberg

    Hong Kong Risks Squandering Its Alibaba Dividend

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Hong Kong is missing an opportunity to displace the U.S. as an offshore listing venue for Chinese companies by keeping trading fees too high. Alibaba Group Holding Ltd.’s $11 billion offering in November showed the potential for the city’s stock exchange to attract U.S.-listed mainland enterprises amid an unsettled trade relationship between the two largest economies. Relatively expensive costs threaten to undermine that appeal.Investors get more for their dollar when they trade on the New York Stock Exchange. In Hong Kong, bid-ask spreads are wider and minimum investment requirements are higher. That increases the chance of so-called slippage, when there is a difference between the expected price of a trade and the level at which it is actually executed. With zero stamp duty and lower minimum trade requirements, the NYSE has a more favorable environment for active investors.Alibaba’s Hong Kong trading volume has slumped since the internet giant made its debut on the local exchange. On Nov. 26, shares valued at the equivalent of about $1.79 billion changed hands. Since mid-December, that figure has dropped to a daily average of about $322 million. The Hong Kong listing has made no dent in Alibaba’s stock trading in New York, where volume has averaged $3.2 billion since late November.To be sure, trading costs are by no means the only factor — or even the main one — in deciding where to buy and sell. To begin with, the U.S. is a more deep and liquid market. It has other advantages, including a more active and developed options market that gives traders more ways to hedge or speculate on stocks. That said, Hong Kong could do a better job of rolling out the welcome mat.Since losing out to New York for Alibaba’s record $25 billion initial public offering in 2014, Hong Kong Exchanges & Clearing Ltd. has made a number of rule changes to enhance its viability as a platform for technology startups from China and elsewhere. In April 2018, the exchange amended its provisions to admit companies with dual-class shares. Smartphone maker Xiaomi Corp.  and internet services company Meituan Dianping listed soon after, demonstrating that when HKEX makes smart decisions, the exchange benefits.More U.S.-traded Chinese companies are looking at Hong Kong for potential secondary listings. They include travel services provider Trip.com Group Ltd., formerly known as Ctrip; game and website operator Netease Inc.; web search provider Baidu Inc.; and e-commerce giant JD.com Inc. The way is open for Hong Kong to create a new offshore ecosystem for U.S.-listed Chinese companies seeking better positioning for the mainland while hedging their bets against a renewed deterioration in the U.S.-China relationship after the phase one agreement was signed this month.It makes little sense to squander this opportunity by maintaining trading costs that are a major barrier to entry. The Hong Kong government and the exchange must work together to make dual listing opportunities both beneficial and attractive to companies while encouraging investors to trade here. However, HKEX regulators seem to have their heads in the sand when it comes to reducing fees and the minimum buy-in to entice more companies. That may be a reflection of its monopoly status: Unlike the NYSE, which must compete with Nasdaq, HKEX has no local rival.Reducing fees would lower the barrier to entry for active investors and increase trading volume. As I wrote in September, cutting stamp duty would help improve liquidity and make Hong Kong stocks more attractive to retail and institutional investors. The ripple effect from this would further strengthen Hong Kong’s position as a global financial center. It’s time for the government and exchange to look beyond the immediate impact of reduced revenue and consider the long term.  To contact the author of this story: Ronald W. Chan at chartwellhk@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Ronald W. Chan is the founder and CIO of Chartwell Capital in Hong Kong. He is the author of “The Value Investors” and “Behind the Berkshire Hathaway Curtain.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Internet-Commerce Outlook: Weak Earnings Outlook & Rich Valuation
    Zacks

    Internet-Commerce Outlook: Weak Earnings Outlook & Rich Valuation

    Internet-Commerce Outlook: Weak Earnings Outlook & Rich Valuation

  • Didi Rival Is Said to Seek Up to $300 Million in Pre-IPO Round
    Bloomberg

    Didi Rival Is Said to Seek Up to $300 Million in Pre-IPO Round

    (Bloomberg) -- Chinese ride-hailing startup Dida Chuxing is seeking to raise as much as $300 million and is considering an initial public offering, escalating competition with larger rival Didi Chuxing, according to people familiar with the matter.IDG Capital-backed Dida is raising between $250 million to $300 million in a pre-IPO round that it pitched to a wide range of investors, the people said, asking not to be named because the matter is private. Dida has mulled floating on exchanges in mainland China or Hong Kong, but prefers the latter, one person said. A Dida spokeswoman declined to comment.Ride-hailing operators are grappling with dwindling investor sentiment after Uber Technologies Inc. went public last May only to see its shares tumble. Dida, which infuses social elements into its car and taxi-hailing operation, has been trying to raise capital since around the middle of last year, the people said. It’s unclear what valuation the Chinese company is targeting.In May 2015, Dida received a $100 million funding from China Renaissance Capital Investment, according to Dida’s website. In March 2017, Chinese private equity fund Nio Capital led a new round in Dida. Hillhouse Capital, IDG, JD.com and Nio Capital participated in the company’s last funding round, according to a slide deck created in August but that’s been recently circulated to investors and viewed by Bloomberg News.Dida says it became profitable last April, earning 29 million yuan ($4.2 million) in the second quarter of 2019, according to the investor presentation slides. The company generated 151 million yuan in revenue for 2018, and expects that to have jumped to 643 million yuan last year, the same presentation shows.Beijing-based Dida is a distant second to Didi in China’s ride-hailing arena but its popularity grew after two female passengers were murdered while using the services of competitor Didi. Dida operates a network of 1.2 million taxi drivers and its daily orders has surpassed 3.65 million, according to the deck.To contact the reporters on this story: Zheping Huang in Hong Kong at zhuang245@bloomberg.net;Dong Cao in Beijing at dcao59@bloomberg.net;Manuel Baigorri in Hong Kong at mbaigorri@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Colum Murphy, Peter ElstromFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why this Cheap E-Commerce Stock Up 140% in a Year is a Strong Buy for 2020
    Zacks

    Why this Cheap E-Commerce Stock Up 140% in a Year is a Strong Buy for 2020

    Vipshop Holdings (VIPS) stock has soared 140% in the last year to crush Alibaba as the online discount retailer expands its customer base...

  • Display Maker Royole Is Said to Have Filed for Confidential U.S. IPO
    Bloomberg

    Display Maker Royole Is Said to Have Filed for Confidential U.S. IPO

    (Bloomberg) -- Chinese flexible display maker Royole Corp. has filed confidentially for a U.S. initial public offering to raise about $1 billion, people familiar with the matter said.The startup seeks funding to expand its sales and marketing and research facilities, the people said, requesting not to be named because the matter is private. It had originally planned to raise that amount via a private financing round at a valuation of about $8 billion, people familiar with that deal said in March. But the Chinese company is now tapping U.S. markets after liquidity tightened during a downturn in China’s venture capital sector, the people said.Royole, known for manufacturing the world’s first commercial foldable phone, competes with Samsung Electronics Co. and BOE Technology Group Co. to produce bendable screens using cutting-edge organic light-emitting diode technology. The company, which gave away wraparound-screen hats at the 2018 World Cup in Russia, this month unveiled a smart speaker that packs a bendable display around a cylinder.It’s unclear what timeframe the company’s looking at, the people said. A Royole representative declined to comment.Royole is regarded as one of a coterie of Chinese technology startups working to dismantle the decades-old image of China as a clone factory by leading in design and innovation. Like Huami and Insta360, these upstarts aim to take advantage of home bases in China close to where devices are manufactured, developing products faster and more cheaply.Founded by Stanford alumni Bill Liu, Peng Wei and Xiaojun Yu, Royole needs capital to plow back into research and expand production. The company, valued at about $5 billion in a previous funding round, invested 11 billion yuan ($1.6 billion) into a flexible display plant in Shenzhen that commenced production in June. Royole is working with Airbus to install displays in planes and also collaborates with clothing, furniture and kitchen-supply customers. Royole has said it secured a deal with Louis Vuitton that will see the two companies putting flexible screens on handbags of the future.Its full line of products encompasses head-mounted displays intended for use as so-called mobile theaters and other wearable flexible displays. The company even has a smart writing pad that it sells on Amazon.com, JD.com and in stores across China, the U.S. and Europe.Royole’s earlier investors include Knight Capital, IDG Capital, Poly Capital Management, AMTD Group, the funds of Chinese tycoon Xie Zhikun and the venture capital arm of the Shenzhen city government.Read more: The Trade War Spurs China’s Technology Innovators Into Overdrive(Updates with details on Royole’s inception from the fifth paragraph)To contact the reporters on this story: Julia Fioretti in Hong Kong at jfioretti4@bloomberg.net;Lulu Yilun Chen in Hong Kong at ychen447@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Taiwan Semi, JD.com and America Movil SAB de CV
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Taiwan Semi, JD.com and America Movil SAB de CV

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Taiwan Semi, JD.com and America Movil SAB de CV

  • Qurate Retail (QRTEA) Catches Eye: Stock Jumps 6.8%
    Zacks

    Qurate Retail (QRTEA) Catches Eye: Stock Jumps 6.8%

    Qurate Retail (QRTEA) saw a big move last session, as its shares jumped nearly 7% on the day, amid huge volumes.

  • JD.com, Inc. (JD) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    JD.com, Inc. (JD) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, JD.com, Inc. (JD) closed at $38.90, marking a +1.57% move from the previous day.

  • 5 Emerging Market Stocks to Buy After a Rough 2019
    Zacks

    5 Emerging Market Stocks to Buy After a Rough 2019

    Emerging markets mostly underperformed in 2019 but have high growth prospects this year. We shortlist five solid stocks from these markets.

  • These 4 Measures Indicate That JD.com (NASDAQ:JD) Is Using Debt Reasonably Well
    Simply Wall St.

    These 4 Measures Indicate That JD.com (NASDAQ:JD) Is Using Debt Reasonably Well

    Some say volatility, rather than debt, is the best way to think about risk as an investor, but Warren Buffett famously...

  • 3 Stocks Making New Highs in the New Year
    Zacks

    3 Stocks Making New Highs in the New Year

    3 Stocks Making New Highs in the New Year

  • JD.com Announces Pricing of Notes, Strengthens Balance Sheet
    Zacks

    JD.com Announces Pricing of Notes, Strengthens Balance Sheet

    JD.com (JD) prices notes aggregating $1 billion. The notes are issued in two tranches with varying interest rates and maturities.

  • JD.com, American Eagle Outfitters, Dick's Sporting Goods, Dollar General and Ross Stores highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day
    Zacks

    JD.com, American Eagle Outfitters, Dick's Sporting Goods, Dollar General and Ross Stores highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

    JD.com, American Eagle Outfitters, Dick's Sporting Goods, Dollar General and Ross Stores highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

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