KGF.L - Kingfisher plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
135.20
+1.85 (+1.39%)
At close: 4:37PM BST
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close133.35
Open132.65
Bid134.55 x 0
Ask134.65 x 0
Day's range131.35 - 139.30
52-week range1.01 - 194.55
Volume8,435,388
Avg. volume11,742,838
Market cap2.853B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.79
PE ratio (TTM)15.72
EPS (TTM)8.60
Earnings date06 Apr 2020 - 10 Apr 2020
Forward dividend & yield0.11 (8.11%)
Ex-dividend date03 Oct 2019
1y target est269.15
  • Don’t waste the stock market crash! 3 FTSE 250 shares I’d buy to retire early
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    Don’t waste the stock market crash! 3 FTSE 250 shares I’d buy to retire early

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  • B&Q shuts stores as anger grows at firms trading despite UK lockdown
    Yahoo Finance UK

    B&Q shuts stores as anger grows at firms trading despite UK lockdown

    B&Q shut its doors but many employers continue to tell staff to come into work despite fears for their health over the coronavirus.

  • Are Sporting Goods Essential in a Pandemic?
    Bloomberg

    Are Sporting Goods Essential in a Pandemic?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- You really can’t blame Mike Ashley for trying.The billionaire founder of Frasers Group Plc tried to keep his sporting goods stores open, arguing that they provided essential supplies of fitness equipment to self-isolating Britons. The retailer has since made a U-turn, closing its Sports Direct and Evans Cycles stores on Tuesday as the U.K.’s nationwide lockdown took effect.Ashley may be everyone’s favorite pantomime villain — and his brash attempt to keep stores open prompted a backlash from politicians —  but as usual, the entrepreneur isn’t totally off point. People around the world are asking themselves exactly what they may need to stay healthy and sane as they hunker down at home to ride out the coronavirus crisis.There seems to be some logic missing in the categories that the British government has deemed essential and non-essential. Some are obvious: supermarkets and pharmacies, for example, should stay open. Clothing shops are clearly far less necessary. Many, including Next Plc, Arcadia Group Ltd.’s Topshop and Primark, the budget fashion chain owned by Associated Foods Plc, had already closed their doors.But other categories are more ambiguous. Why are bicycle shops deemed more essential than electronics and home appliance retailers? Dixons Carphone Plc was among the chains lobbying to be given essential status. The group has now shuttered stores. (Frasers closed Evans Cycles anyway while seeking more clarity from the government.)The government argues that bicycle shops are crucial to help workers get around while avoiding public transport. But surely with many Britons now forced to work from home, it’s also imperative for people to be able to buy computer and phone gear they didn’t know they really needed until now. If they’re out buying food, shouldn’t they be able to buy a cable or a printer too? And what if the washing machine breaks? Many large electronics and appliance stores are conveniently located in the same retail parks as supermarkets.True, people can order via the internet, and many sales will indeed migrate to this channel. But there is a danger that with so many online orders for essential items, delivery capacity for anything else won’t be able to keep up.And filling one’s virtual supermarket shopping cart with things like an extension cord or two, in order to collect it from their local store, risks putting more pressure on staff who are busy filling shelves with staple items and keeping up with an influx of panic-buyers.Kingfisher Plc, which owns B&Q in the U.K. and Castorama in France, has closed its U.K. DIY estate while it looks to find the best ways to still provide essential items. Its Screwfix business, which serves tradesmen, has moved to “click and collect” only. That may be a model worth trying to alleviate some of the issues created by the lockdown, as well as opening only a limited number of stores as Halfords Plc is set to do.  This could ensure much needed goods are available while discouraging shopping sprees.The debate about the right approach to take comes as retailers are facing a catastrophic loss of trade. Trying to do everything to salvage some sales is only logical. Especially as the shutdown could not have come at a worst time with quarterly rent payments due tomorrow.Of course retailers that do stay open must be conscious of protecting not only customers, by respecting social distancing best practices, but also their own staff, who need gloves and masks for example. At some point the virus will abate, and chains will want to emerge with their reputation in tact.But it’s a difficult balance to strike. And it is one that chains in the U.S. are facing as well as the virus case count increases there, although many companies, including Nike Inc., Apple Inc. and L Brands Inc.’s  Bath & Bodyworks, have already closed their stores.It’s important the government help British chains find the equilibrium they need to weather this crisis.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Primark Closes All Stores After Pandemic
    Bloomberg

    Primark Closes All Stores After Pandemic

    (Bloomberg) -- Primark, the budget fashion chain owned by Associated British Foods Plc, has closed all of its stores due to the spread of the coronavirus, which will strip 650 million pounds ($760 million) from revenue each month the shops are shut.Primark had closed 20% of its selling space as of March 16, and on Sunday it shut all stores in the U.K., which generate 41% of its revenue. Separately, Kingfisher Plc said it won’t pay a final dividend and has closed all stores in France and Spain.Key InsightsPrimark contributes more than half of AB Food’s profits, so this will hobble the company. The next step is cost cutting, and Primark is in talks with landlords and is reviewing all spending.This will put a shock on suppliers, as Primark has stopped making any new orders. A slight balm is that the company said it hasn’t seen any material effect from the pandemic on its sugar, grocery, ingredients and agriculture businesses.British clothing chain Next Plc also announced plans to close all U.K. stores temporarily, as did Greggs, the bakery and food-to-go retailer. Next’s online business remains open.Kingfisher delayed its full-year results for two weeks at the request of the Financial Conduct Authority.Market ReactionAB Foods fell more than 7%. Kingfisher rose 14%.Get MoreFor more on ABF’s report, click here.For Kingfisher, click here.(Updates with Next and Greggs store closures)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Coronavirus: UK companies slash dividends by £500m in one day
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Coronavirus: UK companies slash dividends by £500m in one day

    Stagecoach, Go-Ahead, Kingfisher, and ITV were among 10 UK listed firms who collectively slashed shareholder dividends by more than £500m.

  • What to Watch: ITV cuts £100m, companies told to delay results, and stocks slide on Covid-19
    Yahoo Finance UK

    What to Watch: ITV cuts £100m, companies told to delay results, and stocks slide on Covid-19

    A daily overview of the top business, market, and economic stories to watch in the UK, Europe, and abroad.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Kingfisher, A.G. Barr to delay results after FCA call

    Home improvement group Kingfisher and soft drinks firm A.G. Barr said on Monday they would delay publication of their full-year results for at least two weeks, heeding a call from the financial markets regulator on Saturday. Britain's Financial Conduct Authority said listed companies planning to report over the next few days should hold off so that they could better assess how the coronavirus pandemic is affecting their business. Kingfisher said it had received a letter from the FCA on Sunday requesting a delay to the results announcement, which had been due to come on Tuesday.

  • Kingfisher (LON:KGF): should this dividend-payer be in your ISA?
    Stockopedia

    Kingfisher (LON:KGF): should this dividend-payer be in your ISA?

    When the going gets tough, dividends get cut. Given today's volatile market conditions and historically high dividend yields that are often inadequately covere8230;

  • Debenhams asks for rent holiday as coronavirus hits the high street
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Debenhams asks for rent holiday as coronavirus hits the high street

    Retailers are suffering as footfall on the UK high street plummets amid coronavirus fears.

  • Coronavirus: B&Q owner closes 221 stores in France
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Coronavirus: B&Q owner closes 221 stores in France

    France has already closed restaurants, cafes, and non-essential stores amid the pandemic.

  • 3 FTSE 100 dividend stocks I’d buy in the market crash
    Fool.co.uk

    3 FTSE 100 dividend stocks I’d buy in the market crash

    After recent declines, these 3 FTSE 100 dividend champions look too cheap to pass up, says this Fool. The post 3 FTSE 100 dividend stocks I'd buy in the market crash appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • What Is Kingfisher's (LON:KGF) P/E Ratio After Its Share Price Tanked?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Is Kingfisher's (LON:KGF) P/E Ratio After Its Share Price Tanked?

    To the annoyance of some shareholders, Kingfisher (LON:KGF) shares are down a considerable 34% in the last month...

  • The FTSE 100 has tanked. I’d buy these 2 dividend shares in a Stocks and Shares ISA today
    Fool.co.uk

    The FTSE 100 has tanked. I’d buy these 2 dividend shares in a Stocks and Shares ISA today

    These two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) stocks could offer good value for money in my view.The post The FTSE 100 has tanked. I’d buy these 2 dividend shares in a Stocks and Shares ISA today appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    TUI, KingFisher among possible dropouts in FTSE reshuffle

    European holiday company TUI and British home improvement group Kingfisher are among companies likely to exit the FTSE 100 in the blue-chip index's latest reshuffle, according to Reuters calculations based on Monday's closing prices. NMC Health will be expelled from the index after losing about two thirds of its market value after U.S. based short-seller Muddy Waters questioned the UAE-based hospital operator's financial statements. While TUI benefited from the failure of rival travel company Thomas Cook, it has been hit hard by the impact of the Boeing 737 MAX grounding and, as most stocks in the travel and leisure sector, by the coronavirus epidemic.

  • Zooming in on LON:KGF's 4.9% Dividend Yield
    Simply Wall St.

    Zooming in on LON:KGF's 4.9% Dividend Yield

    Today we'll take a closer look at Kingfisher plc (LON:KGF) from a dividend investor's perspective. Owning a strong...

  • Forget the Bitcoin price! I’d invest £1k in these 2 FTSE 100 dividend stocks today
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    Forget the Bitcoin price! I’d invest £1k in these 2 FTSE 100 dividend stocks today

    These two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) shares could post higher returns than Bitcoin in the long run, in my opinion.The post Forget the Bitcoin price! I’d invest £1k in these 2 FTSE 100 dividend stocks today appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • No savings at 40? 2 high-dividend-yield shares I would buy for my ISA in February
    Fool.co.uk

    No savings at 40? 2 high-dividend-yield shares I would buy for my ISA in February

    Starting to invest in income-generating stocks like ITV and Kingfisher can help build savings, says Jonathan Smith.The post No savings at 40? 2 high-dividend-yield shares I would buy for my ISA in February appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Why We’re Not Impressed By Kingfisher plc’s (LON:KGF) 6.5% ROCE
    Simply Wall St.

    Why We’re Not Impressed By Kingfisher plc’s (LON:KGF) 6.5% ROCE

    Today we are going to look at Kingfisher plc (LON:KGF) to see whether it might be an attractive investment prospect...

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