LLOY.L - Lloyds Banking Group plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
31.22
+1.28 (+4.28%)
At close: 4:35PM BST
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close29.94
Open30.64
Bid30.91 x 0
Ask30.97 x 0
Day's range30.25 - 32.33
52-week range27.70 - 73.66
Volume444,097,831
Avg. volume284,027,432
Market cap21.992B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.12
PE ratio (TTM)9.18
EPS (TTM)3.40
Earnings date31 Jul 2019
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend date16 Apr 2020
1y target est75.37
  • Should you buy the Lloyds share price today?
    Fool.co.uk

    Should you buy the Lloyds share price today?

    Is the Lloyds share price a bargain at current levels, despite the dividend cut? Roland Head looks at the numbers and gives his view.The post Should you buy the Lloyds share price today? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Pandemic prompts UK watchdog to devise a rip-off detector

    Britain's markets watchdog says the coronavirus pandemic has shown a need to reinforce consumer protection and it will draw up new longer-term measures to help detect if vulnerable customers are being ripped off. The epidemic has already prompted the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) to propose several measures such as easing the burden of credit card payments for cash-strapped consumers now in their third week of lockdown and with no clarity on which businesses will survive. "These risks of harm could be exacerbated by the global economic uncertainties caused by coronavirus," the FCA said in its business plan for 2020/2021.

  • Should we be worried about Lloyds Banking's Quality Rank (LON:LLOY)?
    Stockopedia

    Should we be worried about Lloyds Banking's Quality Rank (LON:LLOY)?

    Good quality companies can offer a lot of comfort to investors. They tend to be strong, stable, profitable firms that deliver predictable returns, have pricing8230;

  • What I’d do about the Lloyds share price now RBS has crashed too
    Fool.co.uk

    What I’d do about the Lloyds share price now RBS has crashed too

    The Lloyds Lloyds share price has crashed to its lowest since 2012, and RBS is following suit. Should we be selling, or is it time to buy?The post What I'd do about the Lloyds share price now RBS has crashed too appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Should you buy the Lloyds share price?
    Fool.co.uk

    Should you buy the Lloyds share price?

    The Lloyds share price has plummeted in recent weeks. Considering banks' survivability prospects, is now a good time to buy in?The post Should you buy the Lloyds share price? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Is now a good time to buy Lloyds shares?
    Fool.co.uk

    Is now a good time to buy Lloyds shares?

    Lloyds shares have plunged after the lender was forced by regulators to cut its dividend, but this might be a good time to buy says this Fool. The post Is now a good time to buy Lloyds shares? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • The Lloyds Bank share price is at its lowest since 2012! Here’s what I’m doing now
    Fool.co.uk

    The Lloyds Bank share price is at its lowest since 2012! Here’s what I’m doing now

    The Lloyds Bank share price has crashed even more this week. Should I consider buying this FTSE 100 stock now that it's cheaper?The post The Lloyds Bank share price is at its lowest since 2012! Here’s what I’m doing now appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Fresh review of Lloyds payouts over HBOS fraud begins
    Reuters

    Fresh review of Lloyds payouts over HBOS fraud begins

    A retired High Court judge has been appointed to re-review compensation paid by Lloyds Banking Group to victims of one of Britain's biggest banking scandals after an earlier review found victims were likely paid too little. Lloyds has paid out more than 100 million pounds to 191 small business owners defrauded by its Halifax Bank of Scotland (HBOS) branch in Reading, England. Former judge David Foskett has been appointed to chair a panel to re-assess the claims, including direct and consequential losses resulting from the fraud, said Ross Cranston.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    INSIGHT-Crisis haunts British banks in coronavirus relief effort

    With the future of many coronavirus hit firms in their hands, British banks, still scarred by the financial crisis, are worried that they are being asked by a desperate government to make loans that will never be repaid. This caution, combined with the challenges of an unprecedented demand for loans, is testing the British public's fragile faith in the lenders, which have spent a decade trying to rebuild their battered reputations and capital positions. "We've got to only make loans that we can reasonably believe people will be able to repay after the crisis has gone; to businesses which will still be there," Ian Rand, who runs business lending at Barclays, told Reuters.

  • Chancellor to overhaul £330bn coronavirus business loan scheme after backlash
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Chancellor to overhaul £330bn coronavirus business loan scheme after backlash

    Banks have been criticised for being too slow and in some cases profiteering through the government's coronavirus business interruption loan scheme.

  • Bloomberg

    Lloyds Offers Credit Card Holidays Ahead of Regulator Changes

    (Bloomberg) -- Lloyds Banking Group Plc will offer interest-free overdrafts and credit card payment freezes to customers struggling during the coronavirus pandemic, pre-empting the Financial Conduct Authority’s latest measures to help households.The U.K.’s largest mortgage lender said borrowers will be able to apply online for credit card holidays this week, following similar offers for home and personal loans. It will provide interest-free overdrafts of up to 300 pounds ($372) next week.Lloyds announced the changes Thursday, shortly after the British financial watchdog said it was planning to change its loan rules from April 9. Credit providers have until Monday to raise objections.Under the watchdog’s proposal, customers could ask their bank for an interest-free overdraft of up to 500 pounds ($620) even if they do not have any borrowing facility in place. The regulator said that customers with personal loans should also be able to get a a three-month payment freeze, although lenders would still be permitted to charge interest during this period.“If confirmed, this package of measures we are proposing today will help provide affected customers with the temporary financial support they need to help them weather the storm during this challenging time,” said Christopher Woolard, the FCA’s interim chief executive officer.The Covid-19 pandemic has already led the U.K. authorities to increase protection for British borrowers, introducing mortgage payment holidays and support for small- and medium-sized businesses.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Britain says Basel bank rule delay will aid response to coronavirus

    Delaying remaining elements of new global bank capital rules for a year will give lenders in Britain time to focus on dealing with fallout from the coronavirus epidemic, the Bank of England and Britain's finance ministry said on Thursday. "This will provide operational capacity for banks and supervisors to respond to the immediate financial stability priorities from the impact of Covid-19," the BoE's Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) and finance ministry said in a joint statement. The PRA and finance ministry said they were committed to the full, timely and consistent implementation of the new rules and "we will work together towards a UK implementation timetable that is consistent with the one year delay".

  • Bloomberg

    Scrambling for Cash? Cut Out the Middle Man

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The scramble to replace vanishing revenue is forcing businesses to take extreme measures. In the U.K, a firm recently broke the revered convention that a company shouldn’t dilute its shareholders by hurriedly selling a massive stake in itself in the open market. It saved on bankers, lawyers, time and paperwork. One week on, this maverick approach has gained official acceptance.Normally a big corporate share sale is about cutting debt or paying for a big takeover. There’s plenty of time to do this properly via a so-called rights offer: the lengthy process whereby investors get priority allocation on any new stock being sold (hence the “rights”). Today’s need for equity is different. Many companies suddenly have zero cash coming in due to measures aimed at combating the coronavirus. Their lenders may not help unless shareholders dig deep too. There’s no time to lose.The solution that’s emerged is to flout British custom and follow U.S. practice instead: Just sell a big slab of shares, ideally to existing shareholders, but ultimately to whomever will take them. After all, anti-dilution protection is not enshrined in U.K. law but in guidance stating that share sales of more than 10% of the company should essentially be via rights offers. That guidance was sensibly revised on Wednesday, with the threshold lifted to 20% over the next six months. Bosses will need to explain why they’re forgoing a rights offer and still try hard to raise the equity from existing owners.Airport caterer SSP Group Plc blazed the trail last week and sold a 20% stake in the market for 216 million pounds ($268 million). HSBC Holdings Plc, Lloyds Banking Group Plc and Royal Bank of Scotland Group Plc simultaneously agreed to lend it 113 million pounds. Each slab of cash appeared to rely on the other being committed.Sticking with the old guidance was not a realistic option. Investment banks could have agreed to underwrite a “standby” rights offer at a price so low it would have wiped out existing shareholders, for a tidy fee. With that backstop secured, an orderly fundraising might have been possible, for another fee. But SSP’s share price would have subsequently tumbled, and the proceeds would have taken weeks to land. Lenders could have then charged the earth for bridging the financing gap.Why ever bother with a rights offer if you can just do what SSP did? Should nimble share placings become the norm? One argument against this is that small shareholders still get diluted. However in this case, they actually did OK: SSP shares rallied. The institutional shareholders who bought the deal paid a premium to SSP’s prior-day share price; there was no VIP bargain. Moreover, speedy share placings could also be made subject to clawback by smaller holders, with some tweaks to the current documentation requirements.The real problem is many firms will need to raise even more than 20% of their share capital this year. Share offerings that big require a chunky prospectus anyway under European regulations. And at that size, the case for ignoring anti-dilution rights is weaker.Shareholders know multiple demands for cash are looming. Companies should form an orderly queue, ask for no more and no less than they need, and choose their methods accordingly.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Hughes is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals. He previously worked for Reuters Breakingviews, as well as the Financial Times and the Independent newspaper.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Banks told to 'repay the favour' from 2008 with COVID-19 support
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Banks told to 'repay the favour' from 2008 with COVID-19 support

    Business secretary Alok Sharma said it would be 'completely unacceptable if any banks were unfairly refusing funds to good businesses.'

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Some UK finance firms mis-using 'key worker' status - union

    Some financial firms are defining an unnecessarily large proportion of staff as "key workers" to ensure they can still come into the office or branch to work, according to a union representing thousands of bank employees. Together with healthcare workers, supermarket employees and delivery drivers, bank staff deemed vital to the stability of the UK economy have been granted freedoms to travel to their workplaces, under terms of a lockdown which began on March 20. Some employers have applied the special status excessively across their workforces, increasing risks to staff health, according to the Unite union whose membership includes bank branch employees and call centre workers.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-European shares kick off quarter in negative territory

    You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@thomsonreuters.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@thomsonreuters.com) and Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@thomsonreuters.com) in London. Europe's bourses have started the second quarter in negative territory as investors get more evidence the global economy is heading to a deep recession. The pan European index sank 3.2% with the travel and the banking sectors leading the losses.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UK investors tell companies to rethink bonuses if scrapping dividends

    Britain's investment managers would expect banks and other companies to rethink bonuses if they are scrapping payouts to shareholders, the Investment Association said on Wednesday. Top UK banks have scrapped dividends for 2019 and interim dividends for 2020 after being asked to do so by the Bank of England, with other firms also stopping payouts as the economy remains in lockdown. The current situation should, however, not be used to "rebase or reduce" dividends unneccesarily, IA Chief Executive Chris Cummings said in a statement.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-How are construction exposed shares coping with Covid-19?

    You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@thomsonreuters.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@thomsonreuters.com) and Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@thomsonreuters.com) in London. It seems quite clear now that Covid-19 may hit construction stocks harder than the 2008 global financial crisis did, as companies move to shut down construction sites on request of regulators or/and because demand has plummeted. Things seems quite dire to defensive stocks exposed to the construction sector as well, Morgan Stanley analysts wrote in a research note.

  • Lloyds investors! I’d grab some BIG dividends for an ISA with this 13% yield
    Fool.co.uk

    Lloyds investors! I’d grab some BIG dividends for an ISA with this 13% yield

    Are you mourning the loss of dividend income from Lloyds? I think buying shares in this mega-yielder could help to cheer you up.The post Lloyds investors! I'd grab some BIG dividends for an ISA with this 13% yield appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Forget the Lloyds Bank share price! Royal Dutch Shell dividends look safer to me
    Fool.co.uk

    Forget the Lloyds Bank share price! Royal Dutch Shell dividends look safer to me

    As the Lloyds Bank share price plummets further in response to its dividend cut, I don't think Shell will go the same way, even as the oil price slides. The post Forget the Lloyds Bank share price! Royal Dutch Shell dividends look safer to me appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

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