LOW - Lowe's Companies, Inc.

NYSE - Nasdaq Real-time price. Currency in USD
90.94
+2.17 (+2.44%)
At close: 3:59PM EDT

92.57 +1.63 (1.79%)
After hours: 4:07PM EDT

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Previous close88.77
Open94.96
Bid91.59 x 800
Ask91.62 x 800
Day's range90.75 - 96.18
52-week range60.00 - 126.73
Volume7,390,041
Avg. volume6,177,447
Market cap68.655B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.30
PE ratio (TTM)16.56
EPS (TTM)5.49
Earnings date19 May 2020
Forward dividend & yield2.20 (2.48%)
Ex-dividend date20 Apr 2020
1y target est117.24
  • Lowe's (LOW) Stock Moves -0.84%: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Lowe's (LOW) Stock Moves -0.84%: What You Should Know

    Lowe's (LOW) closed the most recent trading day at $82.16, moving -0.84% from the previous trading session.

  • Lowe's (LOW) Down 18.1% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Rebound?
    Zacks

    Lowe's (LOW) Down 18.1% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Rebound?

    Lowe's (LOW) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • Earnings Release: Here's Why Analysts Cut Their Lowe's Companies, Inc. (NYSE:LOW) Price Target To US$123
    Simply Wall St.

    Earnings Release: Here's Why Analysts Cut Their Lowe's Companies, Inc. (NYSE:LOW) Price Target To US$123

    It's been a pretty great week for Lowe's Companies, Inc. (NYSE:LOW) shareholders, with its shares surging 20% to...

  • Bill Ackman Puts Part of His Personal Fortune in Covid-19 Testing
    Bloomberg

    Bill Ackman Puts Part of His Personal Fortune in Covid-19 Testing

    (Bloomberg) -- Bill Ackman said he has invested a portion of his personal wealth to help manufacture antibody testing kits produced by Covaxx, a newly formed subsidiary of closely-held United Biomedical Inc., amid the outbreak of the coronavirus.Ackman has repeatedly called for a complete shutdown of the U.S. for 30-days to help combat the spread of the Covid-19 virus. He has also called for antibody testing, like the one Covaxx develops, across the country to determine who has been contracted the virus.“The key to a successful reopening beyond the maintenance of social distancing, hand washing, mask use and other related practices is a broad-based testing regime and tracing program,” Ackman said in a letter on Wednesday to investors in his hedge fund, Pershing Square Capital Management.“This will enable the inevitable viral breakouts to be identified early and minimized with localized quarantines, reducing the impact on the overall U.S. economy and the need for future shutdowns,” he said.HedgesAckman made a roughly 100 times return on hedges he had put in place to protect Pershing Squares’ $6.6 billion portfolio against the impact of the virus, according to the letter.His firm paid roughly $27 million for the hedges, which were made in the form of purchases of credit protection on investment-grade and high-yield credit indices. The hedges generated $2.6 billion in proceeds by the time he exited them on March 23.He said he has since redeployed the capital by investing further in his portfolio companies, including Lowe’s Cos., Agilent Technologies Inc., Hilton Worldwide Holdings Inc., Restaurant Brands International Inc., and Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Inc. He also reinvested in Starbucks Corp.“The proceeds of the hedges have enabled us to become a substantially larger shareholder of a number of our portfolio companies, and to add some new investments, all at deeply discounted prices,” he said.Ackman said in an interview on CNBC on March 18 that “hell is coming” if drastic measures were not taken to combat the virus. A week later, he said in an interview with Bloomberg TV he had made a $2.5 billion “recovery bet” on a bounceback, after gaining confidence “that the president and his team are heading in the right direction.”Covaxx has already deployed over 100,000 Covid-19 tests in China, and is currently testing in San Miguel County, Colorado. The company believes it can scale the tests to hundreds of millions in “relative short order,” Ackman said. The billionaire made the investment through the Pershing Square Foundation, which manages his personal wealth. He did not disclose the size of the investment.Health officials in San Miguel County, home of the popular ski-town Telluride, teamed up with United Biomedical earlier this month to collect blood samples to test the kits and provide free screening to people in the area.The tests can determine whether a person has been infected by Covid-19 within hours, rather than the days it takes for the current, drive-thru nasal swab tests.Broader antibody based screen will give an accurate estimate of what percentage of the population is infected, Ackman said. That will allow more accurate data on the virus’s characteristics, such as how many people become critically ill and how many have only limited symptoms.“Imagine how differently and effectively we could have managed this crisis if we actually knew who was infected,” he said.United Biomedical has spent years producing vaccines for animals and working on human treatments for diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. It manufacturers its test kits on Long Island, New York.The company has been around for more than three decades. Its animal vaccines have been used to protect billions of farm animals from foot-and-mouth disease and to chemically castrate pigs. It also has developed blood-screening kits and a test for SARS, or Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome.“We believe it is inevitable that in order to halt the advance of the virus and preserve the ability of local, city, and state health-care systems to deal with the volume of critical care patients, nearly all states will eventually initiate strong-form, non-essential business closures and stay-at-home regulations,” Ackman said.(Updates with additional details in the final paragraph; An earlier version of this report corrected the return on Ackman’s hedges)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Target and Kroger take social distancing to next level in war against coronavirus
    Yahoo Finance

    Target and Kroger take social distancing to next level in war against coronavirus

    Target and Kroger undertake new efforts to fight the spread of coronavirus in their stores.

  • How Does Lowe's Companies's (NYSE:LOW) P/E Compare To Its Industry, After The Share Price Drop?
    Simply Wall St.

    How Does Lowe's Companies's (NYSE:LOW) P/E Compare To Its Industry, After The Share Price Drop?

    To the annoyance of some shareholders, Lowe's Companies (NYSE:LOW) shares are down a considerable 42% in the last...

  • Trade Alert: The President Of Lowe's Companies, Inc. (NYSE:LOW), Marvin Ellison, Has Just Spent US$1.0m Buying Shares
    Simply Wall St.

    Trade Alert: The President Of Lowe's Companies, Inc. (NYSE:LOW), Marvin Ellison, Has Just Spent US$1.0m Buying Shares

    Lowe's Companies, Inc. (NYSE:LOW) shareholders (or potential shareholders) will be happy to see that the President...

  • GMS vs. LOW: Which Stock Should Value Investors Buy Now?
    Zacks

    GMS vs. LOW: Which Stock Should Value Investors Buy Now?

    GMS vs. LOW: Which Stock Is the Better Value Option?

  • Lowe's Companies, Inc. Just Released Its Full-Year Earnings: Here's What Analysts Think
    Simply Wall St.

    Lowe's Companies, Inc. Just Released Its Full-Year Earnings: Here's What Analysts Think

    There's been a notable change in appetite for Lowe's Companies, Inc. (NYSE:LOW) shares in the week since its yearly...

  • Lowe's (LOW) Q4 Earnings Beat Estimates, Revenues Miss
    Zacks

    Lowe's (LOW) Q4 Earnings Beat Estimates, Revenues Miss

    Lowe's (LOW) comparable sales for the U.S. home improvement business rose 2.6% during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2019.

  • Why coronavirus may not hammer Home Depot like other big retailers
    Yahoo Finance

    Why coronavirus may not hammer Home Depot like other big retailers

    Keep this in mind amidst the coronavirus worries: not all retailers will be hammered.

  • Lowe's (LOW) Beats Q4 Earnings Estimates
    Zacks

    Lowe's (LOW) Beats Q4 Earnings Estimates

    Lowe's (LOW) delivered earnings and revenue surprises of 3.30% and -0.74%, respectively, for the quarter ended January 2020. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?

  • Lowe's, Papa John's earnings: What to know in markets Wednesday
    Yahoo Finance

    Lowe's, Papa John's earnings: What to know in markets Wednesday

    A handful of big earnings announcements Wednesday will garner the attention of investors.

  • Home Depot Delivers But Can't Get Comfortable
    Bloomberg

    Home Depot Delivers But Can't Get Comfortable

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Who would have thought power tools and patio sets would be big holiday-season winners?After big-box retailers such as Walmart Inc.  and even superstar Target Corp. came up short during the 2019 holiday shopping sprint, Home Depot Inc. rebounded with a better-than-expected fourth quarter. Same-store sales rose 5.2%, ahead of consensus expectations of a 4.7% gain.The gains indicate the home-improvement chain is back on track after a third-quarter stumble. Then, same store sales were below estimates, and growth was slow enough to prompt the company to cut its full-year guidance on this measure. A strong housing market helped in the latest quarter. Consumers are more likely to renovate when prices are rising; moving to a new home also is a catalyst for spending. Meanwhile, warm weather prompted some projects to be brought forward, although this was offset by fewer winter storms, which typically drive repairs. Lumber deflation also eased. The upbeat results are also a sign that an $11 billion effort it announced in 2017 to modernize the company’s stores, upgrade digital options and enhance offerings for its key trade customers is starting to bear fruit.Home Depot is right to invest. Do-it-yourself stores can be soulless sheds if not updated regularly and managed properly. What’s more, the focus on the trade market is sensible. Many consumers, particularly young people, are shunning DIY in favor of  “do-it-for-me” – hiring a tradesman to carry out a job. But the group needs to ensure the benefits of its spending continue to filter through to its results.And there are risks. The first is from the deadly coronavirus. About 70% of the company’s products are sourced from the U.S.; the rest come from elsewhere, much from China, where supply chains are being affected by the spread of the disease. A large amount of first-quarter merchandise is already in stores, and the company is working with suppliers to ensure a continued flow of stocks.The bigger danger, however, is that the epidemic has a broader effect on global economic growth and consumer confidence. Monday’s stock market plunge will do little to make Americans feel good about their wealth, something that is essential for purchasing expensive items such as new kitchen. Meanwhile, Lowe’s Cos. — which is working on its own renovation project under new chief executive Marvin Ellison —could become a more muscular rival.Investors seem to be shrugging off these concerns right now. The shares rose almost 2 percent on Tuesday morning, and now trade on a forward price earnings ratio of about 23 times, a premium to about 18 times for Lowe’s.Home Depot may have put its rough patch behind it. But at its current valuation, the risks can’t be swept entirely under a graphic print rug.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Home Depot quarterly earnings beat estimates, shares rise in pre-market trading
    Yahoo Finance

    Home Depot quarterly earnings beat estimates, shares rise in pre-market trading

    Home Depot earnings are out. Here is what you need to know.

  • Lowe's (LOW) Earnings Expected to Grow: Should You Buy?
    Zacks

    Lowe's (LOW) Earnings Expected to Grow: Should You Buy?

    Lowe's (LOW) doesn't possess the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely earnings beat in its upcoming report. Get prepared with the key expectations.

  • Don't Sell Lowe's Companies, Inc. (NYSE:LOW) Before You Read This
    Simply Wall St.

    Don't Sell Lowe's Companies, Inc. (NYSE:LOW) Before You Read This

    This article is for investors who would like to improve their understanding of price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios...

  • Lowe's (LOW) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Lowe's (LOW) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know

    Lowe's (LOW) closed at $119.35 in the latest trading session, marking a +1.85% move from the prior day.

  • Beacon Roofing (BECN) Q1 Earnings Lag Estimates, Down Y/Y
    Zacks

    Beacon Roofing (BECN) Q1 Earnings Lag Estimates, Down Y/Y

    Lower sales as well as higher costs and expenses mar Beacon Roofing's (BECN) first-quarter fiscal 2020 results.

  • The Zacks Industry Rank Highlights: Lowe's Companies, Builders FirstSource and BMC Stock Holdings
    Zacks

    The Zacks Industry Rank Highlights: Lowe's Companies, Builders FirstSource and BMC Stock Holdings

    The Zacks Industry Rank Highlights: Lowe's Companies, Builders FirstSource and BMC Stock Holdings

  • Zacks

    Late Rally Lifts Stocks Despite Coronavirus Concerns

    Late Rally Lifts Stocks Despite Coronavirus Concerns

  • Bloomberg

    Sold-Out Coronavirus N95 Face Masks Offer a Lesson in Price Gouging

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Now that the government has confirmed the first human-to-human transmission of the new coronavirus in the U.S., a lot of people will be rushing out to purchase masks. That would be, specifically, the N95 air filtration mask, the one recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for blocking most airborne viruses.Oops. Too late.CVS is sold out. So are Lowe’s and Staples and everywhere else I’ve checked — even Amazon. No matter how health authorities try to assure the public that a pandemic is unlikely, the creeping panic continues to creep a little faster each week. And no matter how many experts query whether the N95 mask would even stop transmission of the virus, supply still can’t keep up with demand.What to do?Let’s begin with a thought experiment: Suppose that an entrepreneur — we’ll call him Carter — turns out to have stockpiled several thousand N95 masks a few years ago. Now, noticing the shortage, Carter opens up his storehouse and announces that he will sell N95s, in lots of 20 (as they’re commonly purchased), to the highest bidder. He even sets up a website where people can bid. Every ten minutes, until the supply is gone, the highest bidder wins 20 masks. Bids quickly run into the thousands of dollars for a package that, before the panic, could often be had for less than twenty bucks.What happens next is of course predictable.The outraged news media declares a scandal, the outraged Twitterverse tries to cancel poor Carter, and the outraged politicians stumble all over each other on their way to the nearest camera to charge him with price-gouging. Carter is hauled before the country as an example of how not to behave in a crisis. Greed run rampant. An immoral effort to profit from people’s fear.You can write the script.Carter caves. Humiliated, and worried about his business prospects, he donates his entire store of N95 masks to public health authorities, who in turn will give them out if deemed necessary (that is, if deemed necessary in their view) according to some rationing formula that will be shared with the public only if what the authorities deem to be an emergency should arise. (In China, masks are already being rationed by the government.)But this is a dreadful result.Here’s the simplest reason: Smarter, who happens to possess an even bigger cache of N95 masks than Carter did, will observe how he was treated and decide to keep hers under lock and key. After all, she might need them in an emergency. As a result of the insistence that Carter not sell his property at the price the market is willing to pay, the supply of N95 masks to the public is smaller than if nobody had intervened.College students learn in Economics 101 that a demand curve slopes downward to the right. As demand falls, price falls. As demand rises, price rises. If instead you don’t allow the price to rise — because of your concern about “price gouging” — the quantity offered for sale will fall.This isn’t complicated, and it’s true in every disaster. I’m willing to pay a lot more for a generator when I know the power is going to be out for a week than I am when the lights are on. If the price is unregulated, the difference in what I would pay in those two situations will bring more generators to market. And depending on the cost to enter the market, the rising price will lead more sellers to bring generators to the disaster site, leading to a larger supply, and eventually a lower price.What I’ve just offered is the argument offered by most economists and most libertarians (and, certainly, by all libertarian economists) about why bans on so-called price-gouging are a bad idea.To be sure, there are counter-arguments. At their heart lies the notion that if a demand spike is caused by an unanticipated emergency, allowing sellers to significantly raise prices in response will undercut the morally imperative distributional principle of equal access to necessities. If ten people with the same fatal illness need the two available doses of a life-saving drug, the argument runs, it’s immoral to award the drug to the highest bidders.This intuitively appealing distributional argument helps explain why anti-price-gouging statutes are both widely supported and strictly enforced.  But as with every regulatory regime, it’s important that we consider the cost. Suppose that our concern about equity in distributing the life-saving drug leads us to forbid the producer to raise prices. In that case, unless the government forces production at gunpoint, we’re going to get less of the drug (or the generators or the masks): the very thing we say we want.  Certainly we can decide to make that tradeoff. But let’s not pretend there’s no tradeoff to be made.* * * * * * *Coda:  Whenever I make this argument, whether in the classroom or in print, I’m accused of celebrating the morality of profit over all else. I’m doing no such thing. I’m simply insisting that we not pretend that the solution to a shortage is to insist that producers keep prices low.To contact the author of this story: Stephen L. Carter at scarter01@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Sarah Green Carmichael at sgreencarmic@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Stephen L. Carter is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He is a professor of law at Yale University and was a clerk to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. His novels include “The Emperor of Ocean Park,” and his latest nonfiction book is “Invisible: The Forgotten Story of the Black Woman Lawyer Who Took Down America's Most Powerful Mobster.” For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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