LYG - Lloyds Banking Group plc

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
2.8300
-0.0300 (-1.05%)
At close: 4:01PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close2.8600
Open2.8400
Bid0.0000 x 800
Ask0.0000 x 300400
Day's range2.8300 - 2.8700
52-week range2.4300 - 3.4700
Volume3,345,115
Avg. volume4,444,253
Market cap50.824B
Beta (3Y monthly)1.13
PE ratio (TTM)9.43
EPS (TTM)0.3000
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield0.17 (5.85%)
Ex-dividend date2019-04-04
1y target est2.64
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • London markets climb as pound tumbles on fear of no-deal Brexit
    MarketWatch19 hours ago

    London markets climb as pound tumbles on fear of no-deal Brexit

    London markets climbed on Tuesday as the pound continued to tumble on Brexit concerns despite strong U.K. wages growth.

  • Forget Lloyds! I think this is the better bank to buy for BIG dividends
    Fool.co.ukyesterday

    Forget Lloyds! I think this is the better bank to buy for BIG dividends

    With Brexit casting a huge shadow over Lloyds Banking Group plc (LON: LLOY), Royston Wild picks out a bank with much better dividend prospects.

  • Reuters - UK Focus2 days ago

    UK banks say business investment slowing further ahead of Brexit

    Britain's major banks have seen a growing number of business customers delay decisions on investments and borrowing in recent weeks, as the probability of a disorderly exit from the European Union inches higher. Britain's banks have largely played up the resilience of businesses since the June 2016 referendum decision to leave the EU, but senior executives speaking to Reuters say that in recent weeks they have seen a dip in firms' activity levels.

  • Have I missed something? Could the Lloyds share price be heading to 30p?
    Fool.co.uk3 days ago

    Have I missed something? Could the Lloyds share price be heading to 30p?

    Lloyds Banking Group plc (LON:LLOY) looks cheap, but is the stock cheap for a reason?

  • Could Lloyds and Marks & Spencer be FTSE 100 bargains of the year?
    Fool.co.uk5 days ago

    Could Lloyds and Marks & Spencer be FTSE 100 bargains of the year?

    FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE: UKX) heavyweights Lloyds Banking Group plc (LON: LLOY) and Marks and Spencer Group plc (LON: MKS) are unloved, but offer 6% dividend yields.

  • Reuters - UK Focus6 days ago

    UPDATE 1-BoE says British banks ready for no-deal Brexit, trade war

    * UK lenders well-capitalised for whatever comes - BoE * No-deal Brexit risks economic/market shock * Open-ended investment funds, Facebook's Libra scrutinised (Adds Carney comments from news conference) By David Milliken and Huw Jones LONDON, July 11 (Reuters) - British banks hold enough capital to cope with a no-deal Brexit and a global trade war simultaneously, the Bank of England said on Thursday, although a disruptive Brexit would still cause major turbulence for financial markets and the economy. Bank of England Governor Mark Carney also flagged ongoing concerns about illiquid investment funds, liquidity shocks, crypto-currencies and environmental dangers at a half-yearly update on the risks facing Britain's banking system.

  • Is the Lloyds share price the biggest value trap in the FTSE 100?
    Fool.co.uk11 days ago

    Is the Lloyds share price the biggest value trap in the FTSE 100?

    Lloyds Banking Group plc (LON:LLOY) stock is 'cheap', but is it good value? G A Chester explores.

  • Can FTSE 100 dividend stock Lloyds Banking Group boost your wealth?
    Fool.co.uk12 days ago

    Can FTSE 100 dividend stock Lloyds Banking Group boost your wealth?

    Banking giant Lloyds is a well- known name on the high street. But can the FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE: UKX) behemoth boost your bank balance?

  • Reuters - UK Focus13 days ago

    UPDATE 2-UK's competition watchdog raps Barclays over treatment of small businesses

    Britain's competition watchdog said it has directed Barclays Plc to improve the way its treats small businesses after the bank broke the rules by forcing some to open current accounts to access other services like loans. The rules were designed to make it easier for small businesses to switch bank accounts and access particular financial products.

  • Reuters - UK Focus13 days ago

    INSIGHT-In Brexit Britain, battling home lenders chase risk and pensioners

    STOKE-ON-TRENT, England July 4 (Reuters) - The framed coat of arms hanging in the headquarters of the Hanley Economic Building Society in Stoke-on-Trent depicts two squirrels in ermine robes above the motto 'Save Safely, Build Surely', which the mortgage lender's customers have duly done for over 150 years. In the past year, the lender has started offering more high risk loans, targeted borrowers in their 70s and 80s and launched an interest-only mortgage aimed at retirees that lasts up to 55 years -- the principal is repaid when the borrower dies or moves into a nursing home. The Hanley is one of just 43 building societies left from the hundreds that sprung up in Britain in the late 18th century.

  • 5.6 reasons why I think the Lloyds share price could bomb in July
    Fool.co.uk14 days ago

    5.6 reasons why I think the Lloyds share price could bomb in July

    With half-year financials just around the corner, could Lloyds Banking Group plc (LON: LLOY) be cruising for a bruising?

  • Forget a Cash ISA! I’d buy these cheap FTSE 100 dividend stocks instead
    Fool.co.uk15 days ago

    Forget a Cash ISA! I’d buy these cheap FTSE 100 dividend stocks instead

    I think these two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) shares could offer improving dividend investing prospects to lead to a superior income compared to a Cash ISA.

  • Can the Lloyds share price beat Barclays and the FTSE 100 again in the second half of 2019?
    Fool.co.uk17 days ago

    Can the Lloyds share price beat Barclays and the FTSE 100 again in the second half of 2019?

    Lloyds Banking Group plc (LON: LLOY) and Barclays plc (LON: BARC) continue to underperform but Harvey Jones still believes there is a strong investment case.

  • Should You Buy Lloyds Banking Group plc (LON:LLOY) For Its Dividend?
    Simply Wall St.21 days ago

    Should You Buy Lloyds Banking Group plc (LON:LLOY) For Its Dividend?

    Today we'll take a closer look at Lloyds Banking Group plc (LON:LLOY) from a dividend investor's perspective. Owning a...

  • Lloyds Banking Group plc (LON:LLOY) Is Yielding 5.7% - But Is It A Buy?
    Simply Wall St.21 days ago

    Lloyds Banking Group plc (LON:LLOY) Is Yielding 5.7% - But Is It A Buy?

    Is Lloyds Banking Group plc (LON:LLOY) a good dividend stock? How would you know? Dividend paying companies with...

  • Can a $2.5 Billion Banking Upstart Really Dislodge JPMorgan?
    Bloomberg21 days ago

    Can a $2.5 Billion Banking Upstart Really Dislodge JPMorgan?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Monzo has been awarded the ultimate Silicon Valley seal of approval: A $144 million fundraising round led by Y Combinator, the biggest name in startup accelerators. The deal values the British banking app at $2.5 billion, twice what it was worth in the private markets last year. It has been given a license to lose money like never before as it tries to conquer America, the El Dorado for fintech challengers.The company’s attempt to displace the old “out of touch” lenders, and to show that millennials can get as excited about their bank accounts as they do about Instagram, warrants a little skepticism though. It’s unclear how Monzo intends to make a profit or deliver decent returns to its venture capital backers in a low-margin market that’s crammed with upstart rivals and dominated still by the big banks. Regulators are a worry too.Behind Monzo’s brightly-colored debit card, slick smartphone app, and “Investival” crowdfunding events where you can swig beer and eat street food, is a business that looks pretty much like… a bank. Or rather a very tiny one. It has 2 million U.K. customers; the leading British retail lender Lloyds Banking Group Plc has 10 times as many. At the end of February, Monzo had 71.2 million pounds ($90.2 million) of customer deposits, a microdot next to Lloyds’s 400 billion pound balance sheet.Whereas most banks would seek to lend from those deposits to earn a return, Monzo doesn’t really do that. Its most recent accounts show loans making up only about 0.1% of its total assets. It has started to dabble in personal lending, but the bulk of its revenue comes from fees and commissions. Its main loan product is overdrafts, for which it charges up to 15.50 pounds a month. Otherwise, it relies on getting commissions from partner companies, which use Monzo’s app to offer their own products such as savings accounts and switching energy providers. These are cutthroat markets.Regulatory barriers add to the financial pressure: Monzo posted a loss of 30.5 million pounds in its fiscal year ended 2018. Banking license requirements pushed it to raise extra funds in 2017 and new rules are coming in all the time. Britain’s Financial Conduct Authority is cracking down on overdraft charges. No wonder Monzo has started demanding fees for its premium current accounts. The perks may include “swag” like T-shirts, but 72 pounds a year is pricey.Now consider its next target, the U.S. market. A smorgasbord of cheesily-named mobile banks has been operating there for years: Simple, Chime, Varo, etc. They’ve been trying to challenge the egregiously fat fees charged by big incumbent retail banks, which is fair enough. Yet they’ve got nowhere near dislodging the top lenders. For all their flaws, the biggest banks have the most features packed into their mobile apps, according to analysts at Standard & Poor’s. JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s yearly $11.4 billion tech budget could gobble up four Monzos. Is this a market that’s truly ripe for disruption?Startups do have the edge over their bigger rivals in terms of their institutional simplicity. Victor Basta of the boutique investment bank Magister Advisors reckons the compliance demands at big financial firms mean it might take them six months to match what a startup can do in six weeks. But the heft of Wall Street and Europe’s biggest lenders does give them an advantage in the true fight over finance’s future: With Apple Inc., Amazon.com Inc. and Facebook Inc. The tech giants have the cash, scale, data and engineering smarts to make serious incursions into Main Street if they so choose.So Monzo and its ilk will probably find themselves competing with big banks and Big Tech one day. When that happens, they risk becoming roadkill – or street food.To contact the author of this story: Lionel Laurent at llaurent2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Lionel Laurent is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Brussels. He previously worked at Reuters and Forbes.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • I’d ditch Lloyds and invest in this recovering 5%+ yielder instead
    Fool.co.uk22 days ago

    I’d ditch Lloyds and invest in this recovering 5%+ yielder instead

    Recovery in the home market and expansion abroad could help this share outperform Lloyds Banking Group plc (LON: LLOY).

  • Should You Be Adding Lloyds Banking Group (LON:LLOY) To Your Watchlist Today?
    Simply Wall St.22 days ago

    Should You Be Adding Lloyds Banking Group (LON:LLOY) To Your Watchlist Today?

    It's only natural that many investors, especially those who are new to the game, prefer to buy shares in 'sexy' stocks...

  • Here's Why I Think Lloyds Banking Group (LON:LLOY) Is An Interesting Stock
    Simply Wall St.22 days ago

    Here's Why I Think Lloyds Banking Group (LON:LLOY) Is An Interesting Stock

    It's only natural that many investors, especially those who are new to the game, prefer to buy shares in 'sexy' stocks...

  • Am I about to be wrong regarding the Lloyds share price?
    Fool.co.uk24 days ago

    Am I about to be wrong regarding the Lloyds share price?

    I’ve been bearish for many years over Lloyds Banking Group plc (LON: LLOY). And this is what I think now.

  • Lloyds Fined $58 Million by FCA Over Decade-Old HBOS Scandal
    Bloomberg26 days ago

    Lloyds Fined $58 Million by FCA Over Decade-Old HBOS Scandal

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.Lloyds Banking Group Plc’s Bank of Scotland unit was fined 45.5 million pounds ($58 million) by the U.K.’s finance regulator over a scandal at the bank’s Reading division that siphoned millions from failing businesses a decade ago.The company “failed to alert the regulator and the police about suspicions of fraud at its Reading branch when those suspicions first became apparent,” the Financial Conduct Authority said in an emailed statement on Friday. The watchdog also banned four people from working in financial services, including a pair of former HBOS bankers, all of whom were convicted of fraud related to the affair.The fine ends an episode that cost HBOS financially as well as hurt its reputation. Edinburgh-based HBOS was the subject of one of the most controversial episodes of Britain’s financial crisis. After a state-brokered takeover by the former Lloyds TSB in 2009, the combined entity ultimately required a 20.3 billion-pound taxpayer bailout.Mark Dobson and Lynden Scourfield, two of the four banned by the FCA, were sentenced in 2017 by a London judge to four and a half years and 11 years respectively in prison for selling their souls “for sex, luxurious trips, for bling.” The pair were condemned for their involvement in the scheme to gouge struggling small businesses with high consulting fees and load them with excess debt.“There is no evidence anyone properly addressed their mind to this matter or its consequences,” Mark Steward, executive director of enforcement and market oversight at the FCA, said in Friday’s statement. “The result risked substantial prejudice to the interests of justice, delaying scrutiny of the fraud by regulators, the start of criminal proceedings as well as the payment of compensation to customers.”HBOS was chided for not recognizing information that pointed to fraud earlier and its failures caused delays to the investigations by both the FCA and Thames Valley Police, the FCA said.Lloyds said in a statement that it cooperated with the FCA, has learned lessons from the experience, and has worked to ensure tighter controls and risk management.“2007-2009 was a dark period in HBOS’s history,” Lloyds Chief Executive Officer Antonio Horta-Osorio said in the statement. “I want to apologize once again for the very deep distress caused to the customers affected by the HBOS Reading fraud.”The FCA said the bank agreed to resolve the matter and qualified for a 30% discount, cutting its fine from 65 million pounds.(Adds details on scheme in fifth paragraph, Lloyds CEO comment in last.)To contact the reporter on this story: Hugo Miller in Geneva at hugomiller@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Anthony Aarons at aaarons@bloomberg.net, Peter Chapman, Keith CampbellFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Have Insiders Been Selling Lloyds Banking Group plc (LON:LLOY) Shares?
    Simply Wall St.26 days ago

    Have Insiders Been Selling Lloyds Banking Group plc (LON:LLOY) Shares?

    It is not uncommon to see companies perform well in the years after insiders buy shares. Unfortunately, there are also...

  • Britain's Lloyds fined $58 million for HBOS fraud failings
    Reuters26 days ago

    Britain's Lloyds fined $58 million for HBOS fraud failings

    Britain's financial watchdog has fined Lloyds Banking Group 45.5 million pounds ($58 million) for failures to disclose suspicions of fraud at an HBOS branch in Reading, southern England. The fine is a further embarrassment for Lloyds as banks continue to pay for misbehaviour during the financial crisis a decade ago when Britain had to bail out several lenders. Halifax Bank of Scotland (HBOS) was involved in one of Britain's biggest banking frauds which led to six people, including two former HBOS bankers, being jailed in 2017 for a combined 47 years.

  • Reuters - UK Focus26 days ago

    UPDATE 3-Britain's Lloyds fined $58 mln for HBOS fraud failings

    Britain's financial watchdog has fined Lloyds Banking Group 45.5 million pounds ($58 million) for failures to disclose suspicions of fraud at an HBOS branch in Reading, southern England. The fine is a further embarrassment for Lloyds as banks continue to pay for misbehaviour during the financial crisis a decade ago when Britain had to bail out several lenders. HBOS was rescued by Lloyds in a state-engineered takeover in 2009.

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