MCD - McDonald's Corporation

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
188.50
+4.98 (+2.71%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Previous close183.52
Open186.00
Bid0.00 x 800
Ask188.87 x 900
Day's range184.14 - 188.72
52-week range124.23 - 221.93
Volume2,848,942
Avg. volume4,158,383
Market cap140.16B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.66
PE ratio (TTM)24.67
EPS (TTM)7.64
Earnings date28 Jul 2020
Forward dividend & yield5.00 (2.72%)
Ex-dividend date29 May 2020
1y target est207.28
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  • Hello, Home Office; Bye-Bye, Dunkin' Drive-Thru
    Bloomberg

    Hello, Home Office; Bye-Bye, Dunkin' Drive-Thru

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- As many states ease the restrictions put in place to slow the spread of Covid-19, shoppers are beginning to trickle back to malls, restaurants and hair salons. But even as they venture away from their living rooms for those activities, many who hold office jobs are still working from home. This abrupt, widespread adoption of telecommuting has roiled the restaurant industry, and could continue to do so if large swaths of workers end up settling into this model on a more routine basis — particularly when it comes to certain niches. Breakfast is a prime example. U.S. restaurant traffic in the morning hours suffered from a steeper initial drop during March and early April than was seen at lunch or dinner. Even now, breakfast is recovering more slowly than those other mealtimes. This almost certainly reflects the fact that commutes have disappeared for legions of workers. After all, it doesn’t make sense to take your regular spin through the McDonald’s drive-thru lane when you’re not already in the car en route to your cubicle.  And a ritual pop-in to the Starbucks near your subway stop is no longer convenient. The dent in this business is an unfortunate development for the restaurant industry. The morning hours had been a relative bright spot for years, making up for declines or tepid growth later in the day. Breakfast also tends to be an especially profitable category for fast-food restaurants because the ingredients are relatively cheap. We’ve gotten some early hints as to how this dynamic is affecting major restaurant chains. Executives at Dunkin’ Brands Group Inc. said on the company’s latest earnings call that they had seen a drop in business in the crucial 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. time frame, even as things had picked up between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Jack In The Box Inc. said in May it wasn’t putting much advertising behind breakfast menu items because with fewer commuters on the road, it doesn’t make sense to do so. McDonald’s Corp. has said breakfast “will be the most challenged” eating occasion to recover as states start to reopen, and Starbucks Corp. said last week that it expects the pandemic to deal a blow of up $3.2 billion to its sales in the current quarter, a financial wound that reflects a number of Covid-19-related challenges, including the shortage of worker bees stopping by their cafes as if on autopilot. Meanwhile, Wendy’s Co. has said its launch of a breakfast menu in early March “performed extremely well out of the gate,” but the disruption of diners’ morning routines certainly won’t make it easy for the chain to keep up momentum. It’s a tough break for a company that had been counting on early birds as a cornerstone of its growth strategy.  While independent and chain restaurants alike are looking to delivery to make up for some of the business they’ve lost in their dining rooms and carry-out windows, I wouldn’t count on that model to be much of a savior at breakfast time. Breakfast orders tend to have low average checks, so consumers might balk at paying delivery fees and tipping a driver for such a small purchase. It’s unlikely that working from home will be quite as ubiquitous a year or two from now as it has been in these early months of the pandemic. But a portion of the nation’s workforce is discovering they can do their desk-jockey jobs just fine without sitting in traffic or enduring a shoulder-to-shoulder train ride each morning. If given the choice by their employers, as a number of companies are doing, they won’t go back to that daily slog. This change will necessarily guide how restaurants think about everything from where they locate their outposts to how they allocate labor throughout the day. It also should hasten existing efforts from Dunkin’ and Starbucks to offer menu items and promotions to make them more of an all-day dining destination. Of course, the embrace of working from home is nowhere near the largest challenge restaurants face due to the Covid-19 crisis. A deep recession has the potential to decimate demand, causing diners to make fewer trips to restaurants overall and to rely on discounts and promotions when they do. Pandemic-related changes loom as even more existential risks. Social-distancing rules and norms will keep dining rooms operating at far lower capacities than they were designed for, threatening the so-called four-wall economics of a restaurant. Health concerns may keep some diners from feeling safe enough to hit up these eateries in the first place. Still, the smaller but significant work-from-home effect on dining is a clear illustration of the breadth and complexity of problems the entire restaurant industry is confronting, and the extent to which every corner of the economy is encountering weird domino effects that threaten businesses — from dollars to doughnuts.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Sarah Halzack is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She was previously a national retail reporter for the Washington Post.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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  • Restaurants Will Be Back, I Promise
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    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- In August 2018, according to the seasonally adjusted reckonings of the Census Bureau, sales at the nation’s restaurants, bars and other food-and-drink establishments outpaced sales at food and beverage stores for the very first time. This happened eight more times in 2019. In January and February of this year, it looked as if dining and drinking out had surpassed buying food and drink to eat at home once and for all.Then came the coronavirus, temporary and permanent restaurant closures and a lot of supermarket, superstore and online binge-buying. Since March, Americans have spent twice as much money at food and beverage stores as at food service and drinking places, and that underrepresents the disparity because lots of food and drink purchases made at Costco, Walmart and online are reported under other categories.The gap did begin to close in May, as is apparent in the above chart, but I imagine it will be a while before spending on dining out again surpasses spending on dining in. I also imagine though, that the former will eventually surpass the latter again, and that the gap will then grow and grow in the decades to come. One of the main sources of my belief is this chart:Clearly, dining out supplanting eating at home is a trend that has been in place for a really long time. This time the food and drink purchased for off-premises consumption does include all those online and Costco purchases. The dining-out spending includes accommodations, which was about 16% of the total as of 2018 — I use the combined number in the chart because the food-and-drink-only data isn’t available yet for 2019. A U.S. Department of Agriculture series that includes spending by governments and businesses as well as households shows spending on food and alcohol away from home to have surpassed spending on food and alcohol consumed at home in 2013, and been about 2% higher in 2019.Something big seems to have shifted about how we get our food and where we eat it. Part of the change is, to be sure, about prices: Food consumed at home has gotten cheaper, relatively speaking, than food consumed away from home.Still, Americans have in fact been buying more food from restaurants, not just paying more for it. The food-away-from-home share of total average daily energy intake rose from 17% in 1977-78 to 34% in 2011-12, according to USDA surveys. Fast-food restaurants were responsible for most of this rise, indicating that convenience is a big driver in the shift toward food away from home. But in recent years there’s also been a boom in high-end dining as affluent consumers look to buy experiences rather than things.Fast-food sales are already bouncing back from the coronavirus, with McDonald’s announcing this week that U.S. same-store sales were down just 5.1% in May compared with May 2019, after a 19% decline in April. Full-service restaurants, on the other hand, will continue to struggle until either we defeat the virus or it defeats us (in the sense that efforts to control it are abandoned, not that it kills us all). At the high end, this was a risky, low-margin business even in the best of times. Many restaurants have already closed permanently in the wake of virus-induced shutdowns, and restocking their ranks could take years. Much about the business may need to be reimagined and reinvented in the process.Demand for what restaurants offer, though, is surely not going away. Yes, if working from home becomes more prevalent, as seems likely post-pandemic, the lunch business could take a permanent hit. And if working from home encourages lots more people to work from places less expensive than New York and San Francisco, that could cut demand for restaurant dining in such cities. But those who work remotely have a tendency to settle not in the middle of nowhere but in smaller cities with attractive physical surroundings and lots of restaurants and bars and brewpubs. Bloomberg Businessweek deputy editor Howard Chua-Eoan has a lovely reminiscence in this week’s edition about what he misses about restaurants and how he has coped in their absence. It’s clear that he will be back at these “sanctuaries of joy,” as he calls them, as soon as he is allowed. Millions of other people will be too.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Justin Fox is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering business. He was the editorial director of Harvard Business Review and wrote for Time, Fortune and American Banker. He is the author of “The Myth of the Rational Market.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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