MCD - McDonald's Corporation

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
197.12
+0.81 (+0.41%)
At close: 4:00PM EST
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Previous close196.31
Open196.04
Bid196.90 x 1100
Ask197.20 x 1000
Day's range195.34 - 197.33
52-week range169.04 - 221.93
Volume1973464
Avg. volume3,996,250
Market cap148B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.45
PE ratio (TTM)25.88
EPS (TTM)7.62
Earnings date28 Jan 2020 - 3 Feb 2020
Forward dividend & yield5.00 (2.55%)
Ex-dividend date2019-11-29
1y target est222.53
  • U.S. labour board approves McDonald's bid to settle case by franchise workers
    Reuters

    U.S. labour board approves McDonald's bid to settle case by franchise workers

    The National Labor Relations Board said the settlement, which will bring an end to a sprawling case first brought in 2012, was fair and would provide "a full remedy" to workers who claimed they were disciplined or fired for advocating for better working conditions. The settlement allows McDonald’s to avoid being held liable when franchisees violate federal labour law. The workers who brought the case, along with union-backed organizing group Fight for $15, claimed McDonald's disciplined or fired them for participating in nationwide strikes and protests calling for higher wages.

  • U.S. labor board approves McDonald's bid to settle case by franchise workers
    Reuters

    U.S. labor board approves McDonald's bid to settle case by franchise workers

    The National Labor Relations Board said the settlement, which will bring an end to a sprawling case first brought in 2012, was fair and would provide "a full remedy" to workers who claimed they were disciplined or fired for advocating for better working conditions. The settlement allows McDonald’s to avoid being held liable when franchisees violate federal labor law. The workers who brought the case, along with union-backed organizing group Fight for $15, claimed McDonald's disciplined or fired them for participating in nationwide strikes and protests calling for higher wages.

  • The Retail Apocalypse Confronts a New Crop of CEOs
    Bloomberg

    The Retail Apocalypse Confronts a New Crop of CEOs

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Many of the retail industry’s challenges in 2020 will be familiar, such as adapting to the rise of e-commerce and trade-related uncertainty from Washington. But the lineup of CEOs navigating those conditions will include many new faces.There were more CEO exits in the retail industry in 2019 than in any year since at least 2010, according to data from Challenger, Gray & Christmas.(1)The leadership shake-ups in retail don’t appear to fit any particular pattern. There were carefully choreographed, harmonious baton passes, such as Best Buy Co. naming Corie Barry to succeed Hubert Joly. There were bombshells such as Steve Easterbrook’s abrupt ouster from McDonald’s Corp. over an inappropriate relationship with an employee. There were rebukes of poor performance, such as Art Peck’s departure from Gap Inc. And there were some left-field surprises, such as Tractor Supply Co. poaching Hal Lawton from Macy’s Inc.Retail’s recent bout of turbulence at the top is not such an outlier in corporate America; Bloomberg Opinion’s Stephen Mihm recently noted an uptick in CEO departures overall in the past few months. But it adds a certain intrigue about which retailers will end up in the winners’ circle next year.Here are predictions for how some of the more high-profile episodes of C-suite musical chairs will play out.CEO changes that are reason for optimism: By the time activist investor pressure finally led Bed Bath & Beyond Inc. to dump longtime CEO Steven Temares, the move was long overdue. But the board has scored by luring Mark Tritton — the chief merchant at its on-fire competitor, Target Corp. — for the job. Tritton’s experience creating covetable private-label brands and reimagining store displays are exactly what the big-box home goods chain needs. Meanwhile, though Gap has not yet named a permanent successor for the now-departed Peck, the company may be better off without a leader who tried but failed for five years to revive its flagship brand.CEO changes that are reason for pessimism: The biggest headscratcher comes from Nike Inc., which announced that CEO Mark Parker is to be replaced in January by John Donahoe, a former ServiceNow and eBay Inc. executive. Sure, Donahoe knows Nike’s business from serving on its board, but his tech-centric resume is a weird fit for a company that thrives on its marketing savvy and merchandising expertise. There is potential for trouble, too, in the leadership plans of Under Armour Inc., where founder Kevin Plank is set to relinquish the CEO title to COO Patrik Frisk in the new year. Plank is to become chairman and “brand chief,” and Frisk will still report to Plank. This set-up is reminiscent of when Ralph Lauren first tried to step back from the CEO role of his namesake company while staying on in a creative position. The fashion mogul clearly had trouble releasing the reins, and it cost the company a highly capable CEO, Stefan Larsson.(2)Elsewhere in the apparel world, Ascena Retail Group Inc., corporate parent of Ann Taylor, Lane Bryant and other brands, probably will regret tapping an insider, Gary Muto, to replace David Jaffe. This company needs the kind of total overhaul that an outsider would be better equipped to pull off.CEO changes that promise business as usual: Electronics giant Best Buy is in good hands under Barry, a veteran executive of the chain who had served as its CFO and chief strategic growth officer. Thing is, the electronics giant was already in good hands under Joly, who had steered the chain through an improbable comeback. So expect steadiness for the retailer in the year ahead —by no means a bad thing. Same goes for McDonald’s: Even though it said goodbye to a successful CEO under far more soap-operatic circumstances, his replacement, Chris Kempczinski, is a close lieutenant poised to stick to the same playbook that has fueled the fast-food giant’s recent strength.CEO change wild card: It’s understandable that Tapestry Inc.’s board had lost confidence in recently departed CEO Victor Luis. The company that used to be named Coach has been struggling to boost the Kate Spade brand it acquired in 2017, a bad sign for a company intent on transforming into a luxury conglomerate. Luis has been replaced by Jide Zeitlin, a longtime Tapestry board member. He has little experience in the retail or fashion worlds, which is concerning. But his finance industry chops could prove invaluable in future deal-making — an essential ingredient in the company’s quest for growth.(1) The Challenger data in the chart is for the retail sector only. The apparel industry, which includes manufacturers such as Nike, is a separate category that also saw a particularly high number of exits in 2019. So far, apparel has 12 CEO exits, matching the 2015 annual total that was the highest this decade. Restaurants such as McDonald’s are included in the entertainment and leisure category in Challenger’s data.(2) Lauren seems to have settled into his new role alongside current CEO Patrice Louvet, who took that job in 2017 after Larsson’s exit.To contact the author of this story: Sarah Halzack at shalzack@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Newman at mnewman43@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Sarah Halzack is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She was previously a national retail reporter for the Washington Post.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • IHOP's latest plan to win the breakfast war
    Yahoo Finance

    IHOP's latest plan to win the breakfast war

    IHOP's new restaurant Flip'd will open in Atlanta this April.

  • McDonald's (MCD) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    McDonald's (MCD) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know

    McDonald's (MCD) closed at $194.72 in the latest trading session, marking a -0.12% move from the prior day.

  • McDonald's, Nike, and Expedia: Why CEO turnover spiked in 2019
    Yahoo Finance

    McDonald's, Nike, and Expedia: Why CEO turnover spiked in 2019

    The year 2019 could be called the year of the CEO exodus.

  • McDonald's could sell over 250 million Beyond Meat burgers in U.S. annually - UBS
    Reuters

    McDonald's could sell over 250 million Beyond Meat burgers in U.S. annually - UBS

    In its detailed checks on the tests, which are the first to be made public, the Swiss investment bank said the numbers implied the world's biggest fast-food chain could eventually sell more than 250 million P.L.T. burgers annually if it rolled out the product across its nearly 14,000 U.S. outlets.

  • McDonald's could sell over 250 million Beyond Meat burgers in U.S. annually: UBS
    Reuters

    McDonald's could sell over 250 million Beyond Meat burgers in U.S. annually: UBS

    In its detailed checks on the tests, which are the first to be made public, the Swiss investment bank said the numbers implied the world's biggest fast-food chain could eventually sell more than 250 million P.L.T. burgers annually if it rolled out the product across its nearly 14,000 U.S. outlets.

  • McDonald's could be the key to $1 billion in sales for Beyond Meat, UBS says
    Yahoo Finance

    McDonald's could be the key to $1 billion in sales for Beyond Meat, UBS says

    Beyond Meat could see revenue hit $1 billion if it focuses in its foodservice partnerships, according to UBS analyst Steven Strycula.

  • How Soybeans Became Ubiquitous
    Bloomberg

    How Soybeans Became Ubiquitous

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- In 1905, the U.S. Department of Agriculture sent Frank Meyer to China to look for interesting seeds. Over the next three years the Netherlands-born plant explorer, who had trained at the famous Hortus Botanicus in Amsterdam (and changed his name from Frans Meijer when he emigrated to the U.S.), would send back thousands of seeds, cuttings and whole plants. Among that bounty were the slightly sweet variety of lemon that was later named after him, and 44 varieties of soybean.These weren’t the first soybeans in the Americas. Benjamin Franklin had sent some back to Philadelphia from London in 1770, noting that in China people were said to make “a cheese” out of them. Five years before that a former East India Company sailor had planted a few in Savannah, Georgia, and later even figured out how to make soy sauce. In the 1800s there more U.S. soy-growing experiments, and laborers recruited from China and Japan began to bring not only the beans but also a taste for things made out of them. By the time Meyer traveled to China there were dozens of tofu shops catering to Japanese immigrants up and down the West Coast.But Meyer’s beans were part of a concerted effort that by the early 1940s had enabled the U.S. to pass China to become the world’s top soybean producer. His employer, the USDA, was the most important agent of soy’s rise, but there were many others, from agricultural-science professors at Midwestern universities to Seventh-day Adventists in search of protein-rich vegetarian foods to business titan Henry Ford, who envisioned a world in which more or less everything would be made of soy, including cars and clothing.The $39,000 “soybean suit” that Ford proudly donned in 1941 was only one-quarter soy fiber, though (the rest was wool). Soy fabrics proved impractical, and most of the other non-food soy uses envisioned by Ford and others in the 1930s and 1940s never panned out. Despite the spread of Chinese and Japanese cuisine and occasional commercial successes such as Tofutti, soy milk and the Gardein Holiday Roast that a team of Bloomberg News journalists recently judged to be the best vegan Thanksgiving “turkey,” soy has never entirely captured the hearts of American consumers, either. For the past two decades, demand has been dampened somewhat by concerns about soy allergies and side effects of the estrogen-like isoflavones naturally present in soy.This hasn’t stopped U.S. soybean acreage and production from continuing to rise, though. It is the second-most valuable crop in the U.S., not far behind corn and way ahead of everything else, as well as the country’s most important agricultural export. Those exports have fallen 29% since 2017 because of President Donald Trump’s trade war with China, but the pain this has caused in the Midwest and the billions of dollars that the Trump administration has forked over to assuage it are yet another indication of how important soybeans have become.Where do all these soybeans go? Mainly into livestock feed here and abroad. In the U.S., soybean meal is used most intensively in chicken feed, which is significant because per-capita chicken consumption has more than quadrupled since the 1950s, while beef and pork consumption are down.The second most important product derived from soybeans is oil. Some of that ends up in inedible products such as wood stains and tires, but most goes into food. This country produces four times more edible oil from soybeans than from the No. 2 source of vegetable oil, corn. Few people set out to consume soybean oil, but it’s the No. 1 ingredient in Hellman’s Real Mayonnaise, its doppelgänger from Best Foods, Crisco shortening and Wish-Bone Italian dressing. It’s No. 2, after flour, in Ritz crackers. McDonald’s fries are cooked in a mix of it, corn oil and canola oil.This ubiquity of soybeans in the U.S. demands explanation. When I went searching for one a couple of weeks ago, I found that someone had recently devoted an entire book to giving one. Historian Matthew Roth’s “Magic Bean: The Rise of Soy in America” came out in 2018, and it’s great. Almost all the soybean history recited so far in this column is derived from it. And while I would advise the curious just to go out and buy the book, I have a few more thoughts inspired by it.Roth wonders in the introduction to “Magic Bean” whether the soybean’s American triumph was destined from the start or the result of a succession of lucky breaks. The argument for destiny is that it’s a plant rich in protein that makes an excellent complement to what was already the nation’s signature crop: maize, aka corn. With help from bacteria that like to hang out among their roots, soybean plants put back into the soil the key nutrient, nitrogen, that corn takes out. That’s why soybeans and corn are usually grown in rotation, together dominating the U.S. agricultural landscape from the middle of Nebraska to western Pennsylvania, from northeastern North Dakota to northeastern Louisiana.Still, other bean crops fix nitrogen in the soil, too, and — edamame aside — it takes a lot of work to transform soybeans into something palatable and useful. Major investment in soybean-processing equipment and technology had to coincide with major diversion of cropland into soybeans, which is what happened in the 1930s and 1940s.This was partly the doing of risk-taking private actors such as Henry Ford, Illinois-based soybean processor A.E. Staley and the Glidden Co.’s Adrian Joyce, who steered the manufacturer of paints and foodstuffs into soy in a big way in the early 1930s. But it probably couldn’t have succeeded without the U.S. Congress, which repeatedly aided soy without really meaning to.The yellowish tint of unbleached soybean oil, for example, offered a way around a federal tax on artificially colored yellow margarine that had been enacted in 1902 at the behest of the dairy industry. This tax was extended to all yellow margarine in 1932, but a tariff on foreign vegetable oils imposed two years later offered another boost to soybeans. The landmark Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1933, meanwhile, paid farmers to let fields lie fallow in an effort to stabilize agricultural prices. Crops planted to improve the soil were exempted from the law’s restrictions, which led to lots of acres being planted with soybeans. Most of these were initially just plowed back under, but the USDA started granting exemptions to struggling farmers that allowed them to use the beans as feed or even sell them.After World War II, which brought new soybean uses such as the biscuits made of soy, wheat and oat flour that were a key part of military K rations, soybean farmers had become a big enough constituency that Congress began to help them intentionally. The margarine tax was repealed in 1950, and the Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954 began a policy of subsidizing food exports that proved hugely beneficial for soy. Many government actions since then have been aimed at helping U.S. soybean farmers.Still, the news from Washington hasn’t always been good. In June 1973 the Richard Nixon administration, misreading signals from soybean futures markets that officials thought portended a major shortage, imposed an embargo on soybean exports. It lasted only a week, but is widely credited with jump-starting the rival Brazilian soybean industry because buyers in Japan no longer felt they could rely on U.S. supplies. The subsequent embargo of the Soviet Union imposed by President Jimmy Carter in 1980 in retaliation for the invasion of Afghanistan may have cemented Brazil’s rise as a major soy power.China’s economic growth and ravenous demand for soy to feed its hogs subsequently provided a huge new market, enabling U.S. soybean exports to keep growing even as competition from Brazil and elsewhere intensified. About half the soybeans grown in the U.S. in recent decades have ended up overseas, exported mostly as whole beans but also in the form of meal or oil. Over the past two years, though, China has sharply reduced soybean imports from the U.S. in retaliation for tariffs on Chinese goods imposed by President Trump. As recompense, the Trump administration has handed over $8.6 billion (and counting) in subsidies to soybean farmers, according to an Environmental Working Group analysis of USDA data, with soybean payments now accounting for about one-third of all farm subsidies, up from 11.6% over the past quarter century.I emailed “Magic Bean” author Roth, who is now assistant director of the Andrea Mitchell Center for the Study of Democracy at the University of Pennsylvania, to get his take on these developments, which were too late for inclusion in his book. After reviewing the negative impact of the embargoes of 1973 and 1980, he concluded:Whatever the shakeout from the trade war more generally, it looks like the effect on soy farmers may be long-lasting. (Though when it comes to predicting the future, don’t ask an historian.)This week China began waiving tariffs on U.S. soybeans in a sign of a possible winding-down of the trade conflict. Still, tensions between China and the U.S. aren’t going away, and like their Japanese counterparts nearly half a century ago, Chinese entrepreneurs and officials are now looking for ways to reduce their dependence on U.S. soybeans. The country can’t feasibly grow enough domestically to meet demand, reports business publication Caixin, so among other things it has been exploring new soybean frontiers just across the border in Russia. Could Donald Trump end up indirectly launching a Russian soybean industry? Well, stranger things have happened.To contact the author of this story: Justin Fox at justinfox@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Stacey Shick at sshick@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Justin Fox is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering business. He was the editorial director of Harvard Business Review and wrote for Time, Fortune and American Banker. He is the author of “The Myth of the Rational Market.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 2019 was the Year of the "Chicken Wars"
    Zacks

    2019 was the Year of the "Chicken Wars"

    2019 has been a big year for fast-food chicken, with the "chicken wars" turning from mild to spicy. Will you be trying any of the fried chicken sandwich options?

  • Business Wire

    SHAREHOLDER NOTICE: Scott+Scott Attorneys at Law LLP Investigating McDonald’s Corporation’s Directors and Officers for Breach of Fiduciary Duties – MCD

    Scott+Scott Attorneys at Law LLP Investigating McDonald’s Corporation’s Directors and Officers for Breach of Fiduciary Duties – MCD

  • Target, Gap, Beyond Meat, McDonald's and Costco highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day
    Zacks

    Target, Gap, Beyond Meat, McDonald's and Costco highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

    Target, Gap, Beyond Meat, McDonald's and Costco highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

  • Beyond Meat Strikes Costco Deal: Should Investors Buy BYND Stock?
    Zacks

    Beyond Meat Strikes Costco Deal: Should Investors Buy BYND Stock?

    Beyond Meat (BYND) announced Thursday that its plant-based burger patties would appear in select Costco (COST) stores.

  • HR Departments Won’t Stop Harassment by Banning Sex
    Bloomberg

    HR Departments Won’t Stop Harassment by Banning Sex

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Mark Wiseman, who was seen by many as a likely heir to BlackRock Inc. Chief Executive Officer Larry Fink, is now out of a job. The details we have are scant. In a memo, Wiseman explained: “I am leaving BlackRock because in recent months I engaged in a consensual relationship with one of our colleagues without reporting it as required by BlackRock’s Relationships at Work Policy.”An additional wrinkle: This consensual relationship was also an extramarital affair. Wiseman is married to Marcia Moffat, head of BlackRock’s Canadian division.Coming on the heels of Steve Easterbrook’s ouster as CEO of McDonald’s Corp. for a consensual relationship with an employee, comparisons are bound to be made. But the two cases are different, and while a line back to the MeToo movement will inevitably be drawn, let’s be clear: Neither of these cases involve allegations of sexual harassment or assault.Both cases are about violating company policy – BlackRock’s rule that relationships must be disclosed, and the McDonald’s rule that no boss can date a subordinate, direct or indirect. Companies can’t let senior leaders get away with violating the rules they’re asking their employees to follow.The question we should be asking, then, is not whether workplace relationships are wrong, but whether HR edicts seeking to control them are a good idea.Such policies seem to have sprung up like mushrooms after the spring rain of MeToo. The problem is that that they seek to do away with the “harassment” part of sexual harassment by controlling the “sexual” part. That’s wrongheaded.In fact, the whole post-MeToo conversation has focused a little too much on sex. (I suppose it’s natural; we’re only human.) In the aftermath of that movement, I fielded somewhat panicked questions from men about whether it was OK to ask a cute co-worker out for coffee or compliment a colleague’s outfit. Such innocent overtures were never the problem.Yet in this overheated environment, corporate HR departments seem to have decided that the best way to protect their firms from liability, and perhaps clarify some matters for a few confused men, would be to draw a bright line: No sex with colleagues. Or: No sex with colleagues less powerful than you. Or: No sex with colleagues, or colleagues less powerful than you, unless you tell HR about it. (And what could have a more libido-deflating effect than imagining that particular meeting?)This all seems needlessly Victorian – and tough to implement besides. When exactly are you supposed to disclose your new paramour to HR? Do you need to ask your boss’s permission before you start flirting? Do you have the “Are we boyfriend and girlfriend?” conversation before or after the “Are we HR official?” chat?The fact is, Americans work long hours, and lots of us are obsessed with our jobs. The more time we spend at work, the less likely it is we’ll meet someone outside corporate HQ. Estimates vary, but a significant number of people meet their spouses at work.With work and sex both being fairly central parts of the human experience, it’s inevitable that they’ll occasionally overlap. And it’s really none of HR’s business, though I realize they always like to have a seat at the table.Moreover, as such assortative mating increases and two-career couples become more common, more companies see recruiting top talent as a double act rather than a solo show. In high-flying careers where relocation is the norm, it’s no longer unusual for organizations to recruit both members of a power couple.That development represents progress for women, who are still much more likely to be the trailing spouse. If HR departments seek to ban sex, I worry it will curtail this promising development.HR departments don’t need to ban sex (impossible) in order to ban harassment (imperative). They should focus less on prurient details and more on punitive tactics. Colleagues shouldn’t bully, coerce or browbeat each other, regardless of whether such behavior has a sexual undercurrent. Company policies that clearly delineate what constitutes harassment and protect employees would have a much better result than attempts to track their sex lives.To contact the author of this story: Sarah Green Carmichael at sgreencarmic@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Brooke Sample at bsample1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Sarah Green Carmichael is an editor with Bloomberg Opinion. She was previously managing editor of ideas and commentary at Barron’s, and an executive editor at Harvard Business Review, where she hosted the HBR Ideacast. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Are McDonald's Corporation (NYSE:MCD) Investors Paying Above The Intrinsic Value?
    Simply Wall St.

    Are McDonald's Corporation (NYSE:MCD) Investors Paying Above The Intrinsic Value?

    Does the December share price for McDonald's Corporation (NYSE:MCD) reflect what it's really worth? Today, we will...

  • "Trash" Stocks Riding on Waste Recycling Spree
    Zacks

    "Trash" Stocks Riding on Waste Recycling Spree

    Urbanization and population growth leads to waste generation. However, this provides an opportunity for waste management companies to grow.

  • McDonald's to pay $26 million to settle California wage lawsuit
    Reuters

    McDonald's to pay $26 million to settle California wage lawsuit

    The preliminary settlement resolves claims that the company used a timekeeping system that cheated workers out of overtime, barred workers from taking rest breaks during their shifts, and forced workers to clean and iron their uniforms out of pocket. It resolves claims by about 38,000 cashiers and cooks in California, and is the largest wage settlement against Chicago-based McDonald's in the United States, representatives for the plaintiffs said. The accord requires McDonald's to pay required overtime, track pay electronically, provide rest breaks during rather than at the start or end of shifts, and provide replacement work uniforms when old uniforms become damaged or worn out.

  • McDonald's employees in Chicago sue over workplace violence
    Reuters

    McDonald's employees in Chicago sue over workplace violence

    McDonald's Corp employees on Thursday sued the fast food giant and several of its franchisees in Chicago over a store redesign that staffers say has made it easier for angry customers to leap over the counter and attack them. The suit, filed in Illinois' Circuit Court of Cook County by 17 Chicago-area McDonald's workers, claims McDonald's has failed to protect them from a pattern of violence. Employees have been threatened with guns, beaten with a wet-floor sign, had kitchen equipment thrown at them by a naked customer, been pepper-sprayed, been flashed and propositioned, and even urinated on, according to the complaint.

  • Why Is McDonald's (MCD) Down 2.6% Since Last Earnings Report?
    Zacks

    Why Is McDonald's (MCD) Down 2.6% Since Last Earnings Report?

    McDonald's (MCD) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • The NASDAQ Needs No Break
    Zacks

    The NASDAQ Needs No Break

    The NASDAQ Needs No Break

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