MRW.L - Wm Morrison Supermarkets PLC

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
183.10
+1.40 (+0.77%)
As of 10:44AM GMT. Market open.
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Previous close181.70
Open183.00
Bid183.05 x 0
Ask183.10 x 0
Day's range181.86 - 184.30
52-week range176.90 - 240.10
Volume543,519
Avg. volume8,742,840
Market cap4.469B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.34
PE ratio (TTM)14.30
EPS (TTM)12.80
Earnings date18 Mar 2020
Forward dividend & yield0.07 (3.68%)
Ex-dividend date26 Sep 2019
1y target est251.79
  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Tesco unlawfully stopped rivals from opening stores - UK regulator

    Tesco, Britain's biggest retailer, unlawfully stopped major supermarket rivals from opening shops near its stores, the country's competition regulator said on Friday. The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) said it first discovered that Tesco had been preventing landlords from letting property to other supermarkets during monitoring in 2018. Tesco then reviewed all of its land agreements, finding 23 breaches in total.

  • Is WM MORRISON SUP (MRWSY) Stock Undervalued Right Now?
    Zacks

    Is WM MORRISON SUP (MRWSY) Stock Undervalued Right Now?

    Here at Zacks, our focus is on the proven Zacks Rank system, which emphasizes earnings estimates and estimate revisions to find great stocks. Nevertheless, we are always paying attention to the latest value, growth, and momentum trends to underscore strong picks.

  • Morrison Supermarkets (LON:MRW): share price weakness ahead?
    Stockopedia

    Morrison Supermarkets (LON:MRW): share price weakness ahead?

    Momentum is sticky and persists for longer than investors tend to anticipate. The downside of this is that stocks with recent negative momentum are likely to c8230;

  • Alcohol-free beer and veg sales soar in 'month of moderation'
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Alcohol-free beer and veg sales soar in 'month of moderation'

    Kantar figures show shoppers having a healthier start to the year, with sales of alcohol-free drinks, aubergines and vegetarian burgers soaring at supermarkets.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Britain's supermarkets see weak start to year - Kantar

    Britain's grocery industry endured a subdued start to the year with all of the traditional big four supermarket groups seeing year-on-year sales declines in the latest 12-week trading period, industry data showed on Tuesday. Market researcher Kantar said total UK grocery sales rose just 0.3% in the 12 weeks to Jan. 26, as consumers cut down on alcohol and meat, buying-in to "Dry January" and "Veganuary" campaigns.

  • Forget buy-to-let! I’d invest in these 2 FTSE 100 stocks today to make a million
    Fool.co.uk

    Forget buy-to-let! I’d invest in these 2 FTSE 100 stocks today to make a million

    These two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) shares could deliver improving returns in my opinion.The post Forget buy-to-let! I’d invest in these 2 FTSE 100 stocks today to make a million appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Cheapest supermarkets to shop as a vegan
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    Cheapest supermarkets to shop as a vegan

    Supermarkets are cashing in by offering more products to suit a plant based diet.

  • Is There An Opportunity With Wm Morrison Supermarkets PLC's (LON:MRW) 38% Undervaluation?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is There An Opportunity With Wm Morrison Supermarkets PLC's (LON:MRW) 38% Undervaluation?

    Today we'll do a simple run through of a valuation method used to estimate the attractiveness of Wm Morrison...

  • £1,000 to invest? I’d pocket this 9% dividend yield
    Fool.co.uk

    £1,000 to invest? I’d pocket this 9% dividend yield

    This high-yield dividend stock is on the up after a strong set of quarterly figures. The post £1,000 to invest? I'd pocket this 9% dividend yield appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Is the Morrison share price (LON:MRW) good value?
    Stockopedia

    Is the Morrison share price (LON:MRW) good value?

    Here's why how cheap or expensive shares in large cap Food Retail amp;amp; Distribution operator Morrison Supermarkets (LON:MRW)matters. Stacks of academic re8230;

  • Horrid Holidays Can't All Be Blamed on Brexit
    Bloomberg

    Horrid Holidays Can't All Be Blamed on Brexit

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Christmas 2019 should be consigned to the dustbin along with the crumpled wrapping paper and the wilted tree. That’s the message that has come in loud and clear from British retailers. And it caps off a miserable year. Total sales for 2019 fell by 0.1%, the worst year on record, according to the British Retail Consortium and KPMG.There’s no doubt consumers were cautious in the run-up to the holidays. But store groups can’t blame it all on Brexit. There were some own goals, too.Wm Morrison Supermarkets Plc missed the halo effect from Black Friday by reining in promotions right as shoppers sought deals during the U.S-imported retail frenzy. Marks & Spencer Group Plc also hasn’t participated for the past few years. While it’s the right instinct to protect against diluting margins ahead of the holiday season, going too far to do so is painful too.John Lewis Partnership Plc warned that its profit would be “significantly lower” than a year ago, and parted company with the head of its department-store arm, Paula Nickolds. It’s hard not to think the privately held company’s challenges have been made worse by some of its own decisions, such as blindly sticking to its pledge to always be cheaper than rivals. Times have changed since the promise was made many years ago, and it’s become untenable in a market characterized by intense and constant discounting.But perhaps the performance by M&S is the most disappointing. After seeing some positive signs in women’s wear, it made a fashion faux pas in men’s clothing by getting too trendy for many of its customers. Its range of more contemporary, slim fitting shirts and suits weren’t on trend with its predominantly older shopper base, and it simply stocked too many small sizes than was reasonable.The high street stalwart also didn’t have the right Christmas gifts, having gone down market just as consumers were seeking more expensive items, such as cashmere sweaters, and more experiential gifts such as spa days. Consequently, M&S’s like-for-like sales in clothing and home furnishings fell 1.7% in the third quarter, worse than the consensus of analysts’ expectations for a 0.8% decline.The performance is particularly disappointing given that many of M&S’s key competitors, including Debenhams Plc, John Lewis department stores, Mike Ashley’s House of Fraser and Philip Green’s Arcadia, are not firing on all cylinders. And the self-inflicted damage wasn’t confined to clothing. Although demand for M&S’s Christmas food was strong, it wasn’t as pronounced as it had hoped. It misread the market, buying too much festive fare to make sure it had enough available and wound up with far too many leftovers once the holidays came to an end. Consequently, gross margins are expected to be at the lower end of expectations.The shares fell as much as 11.6%. It isn’t the first time M&S has messed up at Christmas. In the past, it suffered from problems at a key distribution center at Castle Donington in central England. This year that facility held up, but the new round of blunders is worrying. In contrast, other groups that have been operating quietly without hiccups, such as Tesco Plc, Greggs Plc and discount home-furnishings retailer Dunelm Group Plc, delivered solid performances. It will also be worth watching out for Associated British Foods Plc, which should have benefited from Primark’s strong selection of gifts and party dresses in the run up to the holiday.With any Boris bounce after the U.K. election proving elusive, 2020 is set to remain tough. The lesson from this Christmas trading season is that to prosper, retailers need to stick to their knitting, and ensure that their own actions don’t make an already difficult backdrop even worse.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Tesco sales inch higher over 'challenging' Christmas
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Tesco sales inch higher over 'challenging' Christmas

    Sales rose 0.4% in the UK and Ireland over the crucial Christmas trading period.

  • Here’s what I’d do about the fallen Sainsbury’s and Morrisons share prices
    Fool.co.uk

    Here’s what I’d do about the fallen Sainsbury’s and Morrisons share prices

    Christmas trading news is in from WM Morrison and J Sainsbury, and the share prices of both are down. Time to buy?

  • Sainsbury's sales fall over Christmas after Argos slump
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Sainsbury's sales fall over Christmas after Argos slump

    Sales at Sainsbury's fell by 0.7% over the crucial Christmas trading period, dragged down by a slump at Argos.

  • Could this FTSE 100 company’s almost 5% dividend yield swell your portfolio?
    Fool.co.uk

    Could this FTSE 100 company’s almost 5% dividend yield swell your portfolio?

    Does “strong” execution and “robust” profitability make this share a buy?

  • The Boris Bounce Was More of a Christmas Turkey
    Bloomberg

    The Boris Bounce Was More of a Christmas Turkey

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Flashback to mid-December. British voters had just delivered a decisive national election victory to Boris Johnson’s Conservatives with two full weekends left before Christmas. Expectations were high that shoppers, giddy at the prospect of an end to political gridlock and repetitive threats of hard Brexit, would rush to the stores to make up for lost time in their holiday preparations and provide a much-needed boost for the country’s big supermarket chains.Anyone in the industry expecting a Boris bounce was sorely disappointed. Numbers out Tuesday show the U.K.’s largest food retailers suffered from subdued trading over the crucial Christmas and New Year’s period.Wm Morrison Supermarkets Plc said consumers remained cautious, even if there was a bit of relief following the election result. Still, it wasn’t enough to make up for belt tightening. Although customers put the same amount of Christmas fare in their baskets, the number of times they shopped was marginally down, it said.It didn’t help that a price war broke out in the run up to the holidays, with the U.K. arms of the German discount chains Lidl and Aldi slashing prices. They drew shoppers with offers, such as bags of Christmas vegetables from as little as 15 pence. Morrison was offering three British vegetables for one pound, including a 2.5 kg bag of Maris Piper potatoes, described by Chief Executive Officer David Potts as a knock-out offer. But with intense competition from the discounters, perhaps it just wasn’t knock out enough. Where consumers treated themselves, it seems they opted for Aldi’s Specially Selected mince pies.Moderating food price inflation was also a hindrance. Morrison estimated that over the past couple of months food-price inflation was close to zero. When food prices are rising, the value of supermarkets’ sales is automatically boosted.Morrison may turn out to be one of the weakest performers. But trading across the whole of the U.K. food retail market was lackluster, according to industry research group Kantar. 2019 saw the lowest rate of growth over the Christmas period since 2015, it said.What oxygen there is in the market is feeding the discount supermarkets. Excluding online-only supermarket Ocado Group Plc, Lidl was the strongest performer in the 12 weeks to Dec. 29, with sales up by 10.3%, according to Kantar. Aldi also expanded its sales by 5.9%, a slower rate of growth than in the past, but still way ahead of the so-called big four supermarkets, Tesco, J Sainsbury Plc, Walmart Inc.’s U.K. arm Asda and Morrison.Sainsbury, which reports on Wednesday, may be more upbeat than Morrison, as its stronghold is in the southeast, where there is less competition from the discounters, and it tends to outperform at Christmas. Tesco may also do better, as it has been one of the stronger performers over the past few months, and that may continue.But it provides little comfort that all of the big four saw their sales fall in the 12 weeks to Dec. 29, compared with the year earlier, according to Kantar.With U.K. wage growth still ahead of inflation, and consumer confidence showing some improvement, Johnson’s resounding victory and the certainty it appeared to provide around Britain’s departure from the European Union was supposed to boost holiday shopping. Coming in mid-December, it probably came too late to make a noticeable impact on spending on clothing and gifts, but it should have had a positive impact on supermarket shopping. That clearly didn’t happen, and that is a worrying sign for grocers as they move into what is traditionally a lean time after the holidays. This year it could be even more painful, as many consumers move out of categories such as alcohol and meat, as trends like Dry January and Veganuary gain pace.As for Morrison, the company needs to be on its guard. When food prices are rising, all of the big four supermarkets can prosper at the same time. When there is little growth, grocers need to steal sales from a weaker rival. This time last year, that was looking like Sainsbury. Now Morrison looks vulnerable. It has a strong management team, robust balance sheet, more than 85% freehold property and a developing wholesale business. Even so, it needs to get its sales growth back on track, to make make sure it does not become 2020’s Christmas feast.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • What to Watch: Aston Martin sinks, Premier Oil deal and supermarket woes
    Yahoo Finance UK

    What to Watch: Aston Martin sinks, Premier Oil deal and supermarket woes

    A daily overview of the top business, market and economic stories you should be watching today in the UK and abroad.

  • 'Unusually challenging' Christmas for supermarkets
    Yahoo Finance UK

    'Unusually challenging' Christmas for supermarkets

    Morrisons reported falling festive sales Tuesday and market researcher Kantar Worldpanel said all of the 'Big Four' lost market share over Christmas.

  • No savings at 50? I’d buy these 2 FTSE 100 stocks to retire early
    Fool.co.uk

    No savings at 50? I’d buy these 2 FTSE 100 stocks to retire early

    These two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) shares could offer impressive long-term returns in my opinion.

  • Next Christmas sales beat forecasts thanks to cold November
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Next Christmas sales beat forecasts thanks to cold November

    The High Street retailer said a cold November helped spur sales ahead of its internal forecasts.

  • Could buying this FTSE 100 stock help you get 2020 off to a flyer?
    Fool.co.uk

    Could buying this FTSE 100 stock help you get 2020 off to a flyer?

    Royston Wild looks at a FTSE 100 share that's about to report and considers its share price prospects.

  • Some Wm Morrison Supermarkets (LON:MRW) Shareholders Are Down 12%
    Simply Wall St.

    Some Wm Morrison Supermarkets (LON:MRW) Shareholders Are Down 12%

    In order to justify the effort of selecting individual stocks, it's worth striving to beat the returns from a market...

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 2-Election takes edge off stocks with biggest British exposure

    Stocks most exposed to the British economy slipped on Wednesday on growing expectations of a close election outcome, while JD Sports dropped 10% after its top investor cut its stake. The exporter-heavy FTSE 100 ended flat as gains due to a weakening of the pound were offset by steep losses in oil firms after a surprise build-up of U.S. crude inventories.

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