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Morgan Stanley (MS)

NYSE - Nasdaq Real-time price. Currency in USD
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79.86+1.28 (+1.62%)
As of 11:41AM EDT. Market open.
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Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
Previous close78.59
Open78.30
Bid79.65 x 800
Ask79.65 x 1100
Day's range78.11 - 80.08
52-week range35.53 - 86.64
Volume6,111,126
Avg. volume11,676,183
Market cap149.391B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.56
PE ratio (TTM)10.45
EPS (TTM)7.64
Earnings date14 Jul 2021 - 19 Jul 2021
Forward dividend & yield1.40 (1.78%)
Ex-dividend date28 Jan 2021
1y target est89.52
  • Morgan Stanley Joins Bank Bond Bonanza With Three-Part Sale
    Bloomberg

    Morgan Stanley Joins Bank Bond Bonanza With Three-Part Sale

    (Bloomberg) -- Morgan Stanley is joining its peers in issuing bonds after earnings, adding to a record borrowing spree for Wall Street’s biggest banks.The bank is selling unsecured bonds in three parts, which may total around $6 billion, according to separate people with knowledge of the matter. They’re all structured as fixed-to-floating rate notes, and proceeds are earmarked for general corporate purposes, according to one of the people, who asked not to be identified as the details are private.A representative for Morgan Stanley didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment on the targeted deal size.Banks typically tap the market after quarterly earnings, and they’re coming out in full force with borrowing costs near the lowest levels in years. The expiration of relief related to supplementary leverage ratios could also be spurring issuance.JPMorgan Chase & Co. sold $13 billion of bonds Thursday in what was the largest bank bond sale ever, only for Bank of America Corp. to borrow $15 billion the next day. Goldman Sachs Group Inc. issued $6 billion, while Citigroup Inc. may also come forward, according to Bloomberg Intelligence analyst Arnold Kakuda.Separately, JPMorgan is also tapping the sterling market Monday.Morgan Stanley is the lead manager of its bond sale, while CastleOak Securities, Ramirez & Co. and Mischler Financial Group are also managing the offering, one of the people said.(Updates with expected deal size in second paragraph, underwriters in final paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Coinbase Hangover Rattles Crypto Assets With Bitcoin Falling
    Bloomberg

    Coinbase Hangover Rattles Crypto Assets With Bitcoin Falling

    (Bloomberg) -- The mania that drove crypto assets to records as Coinbase Global Inc. went public last week turned on itself on the weekend, sending Bitcoin tumbling the most since February.The world’s biggest cryptocurrency plunged as much as 15% on Sunday, just days after reaching a record of $64,870. It subsequently pared some of the losses and was trading at about $57,000 at around 1:25 p.m. in Tokyo Monday.Ether, the second-biggest token, dropped below $2,000 over the weekend before also paring losses. The volatility buffeted Binance Coin, XRP and Cardano too. Dogecoin -- the token started as a joke -- bucked the trend and is up 25% over 24 hours, according to CoinGecko.The weekend carnage came after a heady period for the industry that saw the value of all coins surge past $2.25 trillion amid a frenzy of demand for all things crypto in the runup to Coinbase’s direct listing on Wednesday. The largest U.S. crypto exchange ended the week valued at $68 billion, more than the owner of the New York Stock Exchange.“With hindsight it was inevitable,” Galaxy Digital founder Michael Novogratz said in a tweet Sunday. “Markets got too excited around $Coin direct listing. Basis blowing out, coins like $BSV, $XRP and $DOGE pumping. All were signs that the market got too one way.”Dogecoin, which has limited use and no fundamentals, rallied last week to be worth about $50 billion at one point before stumbling Saturday. Demand was so brisk for the token that investors trying to trade it on Robinhood crashed the site a few times Friday, the online exchange said in a blog post.There was also speculation Sunday in several online reports that the crypto plunge was related to concerns the U.S. Treasury may crack down on money laundering carried out through digital assets. The Treasury declined to comment, and its Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) said in an emailed response on Sunday that it “does not comment on potential investigations, including on whether or not one exists.”‘Price to Pay’“The crypto world is waking up with a bit of a sore head today,” said Antoni Trenchev, co-founder of crypto lender Nexo. “Dogecoin’s 100% Friday rally was ‘peak party,’ after the Bitcoin record and Coinbase listing earlier in the week. Euphoria was in the air. And usually in the crypto world, there’s a price to pay when that happens.”Besides the “unsubstantiated” report of a U.S. Treasury crackdown, Trenchev said factors for the declines may have included “excess leverage, Coinbase insiders dumping equity after the direct listing and a mass outage in China’s Xinjiang province hitting Bitcoin miners.”Growing mainstream acceptance of cryptocurrencies has spurred Bitcoin’s rally, as well as lifting other tokens to record highs. Bitcoin’s most ardent proponents see it as a modern-day store of value and inflation hedge, while others fear a speculative bubble is building.Interest in crypto went on the rise again after companies from PayPal to Square started enabling transactions in Bitcoin on their systems, and Wall Street firms like Morgan Stanley moved toward providing access to the tokens to some of the wealthiest clients.VolatilityThat’s despite lingering concerns over their volatility and usefulness as a method of payment. Moreover, governments are inspecting risks around the sector more closely as the investor base widens.Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell last week said Bitcoin “is a little bit like gold” in that it’s more a vehicle for speculation than making payments. European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde in January took aim at Bitcoin’s role in facilitating criminal activity, saying the cryptocurrency has been enabling “funny business.”Turkey’s central bank banned the use of cryptocurrencies as a form of payment from April 30, saying the level of anonymity behind the digital tokens brings the risk of “non-recoverable” losses.(Updates prices in the second and third paragraphs.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

  • China’s Internet Stocks Face More Pain, Global Investors Say
    Bloomberg

    China’s Internet Stocks Face More Pain, Global Investors Say

    (Bloomberg) -- After a historic antitrust crackdown on China’s biggest tech companies last week, investors are betting there is more pain ahead.GAM Investments, BNP Paribas Asset Management and JP Morgan Asset Management Inc. see more regulatory tightening in China’s clampdown on monopolistic practices, putting pressure on the country’s leading internet stocks over the next few months. The Hang Seng Tech Index, where many Chinese tech giants are listed, has already lost about a quarter of its value from a rout that began mid-February.The shockwaves from Beijing’s bid to quell abuses of information and market dominance among industry leaders have left global investors pondering the prospects of China’s internet firms. The antitrust crackdown has exacerbated a global tech selloff sparked by rising bond yields, as traders forecast tighter liquidity conditions at home and abroad and lower company valuations.“Regulations for China internet companies, especially the big ones, will continue to tighten in 2021,” said Marcella Chow, global market strategist at JP Morgan Asset. “This uncertainty may act as a cap for some companies temporarily.”China slapped a record $2.8 billion fine on Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. after a four-month long investigation into the e-commerce giant’s market practices, then ordered an overhaul of Ant Group Co. Over the past week, more than 30 tech giants issued pledges to obey antitrust laws after Beijing gave them a month to conduct reviews and comply with government guidelines.READ: Jack Ma’s Double-Whammy Marks the End of China Tech’s Golden AgeAlibaba shares have slumped 23% in Hong Kong from a peak in October. Food delivery platform Meituan and tech giant Tencent Holdings Ltd., which have been on analyst radars for regulatory probes, are down 36% and 18%, respectively, from their peaks earlier this year. By contrast, the Nasdaq 100 index is up more than 8% this year despite entering a technical correction in March.Looking ahead, China’s tech companies are likely to move far more cautiously on acquisitions, over-compensate on getting signoffs from Beijing, and levy lower fees on the domestic internet traffic they dominate. This coincides with some facing delisting threats and sales curbs in the U.S., and others reverberating from a selloff sparked by Archegos Capital Management.Valuations too are serving as a deterrent for investors. Even after its decline, the Hang Seng Tech Index is trading at about 38 times its 12-month earnings estimates versus the 29 times multiple of its American counterpart.“We have already applied a valuations discount to the whole Chinese internet sector to factor in higher regulation risks,” said Jian Shi Cortesi, a Zurich-based fund manager at GAM. The $132 billion asset manager has reduced its exposure to the sector in the past few months amid high valuations, she added.The Hang Seng Tech Index was down as much as 1.1% on Monday. Tencent shares fell as much as 1.9% after Citigroup Inc. and Morgan Stanley lowered their target prices on expectations that advertising revenues will take a hit as apparel-brand and online-education providers cut spending.Keep the FaithThat said, Beijing has moved far faster with its antitrust reforms than the U.S. and Europe have in similar efforts. The landmark case against Microsoft Corp.’s alleged software monopoly took more than half a decade of back-and-forth before settling in 2004. Current hearings involving U.S. tech titans from Google to Facebook Inc. span several fronts, multiple cases and plaintiffs, and may not see the inside of a courtroom for years to come.In contrast, Beijing regulators torpedoed Ant’s IPO the month after Ma’s infamous speech, published new rules shortly after intended to curb monopolistic practices across its internet landscape, then launched its probe into Alibaba on Christmas Eve.“Clarity reduces uncertainty, so this is a positive,” said Joshua Crabb, a portfolio manager at Robeco in Hong Kong.That has helped give investors more optimism for the long term. Money managers see the potential for tech companies to boost earnings as digital technologies catch on for everything from e-commerce and entertainment to social media, a trend that has been accelerated by the pandemic.Meanwhile, mainland traders have kept the faith. They still hold about 6.5% stake in Tencent, the highest in at least three years, according to calculations by Bloomberg based on exchange data.“Post this round of regulation scrutiny, we believe the Chinese internet industry will resume healthy growth,” GAM’s Cortesi said.(Updates with performance of Hang Seng Tech Index, Tencent in tenth paragraph.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2021 Bloomberg L.P.