MSFT - Microsoft Corporation

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real-time price. Currency in USD
137.08
-1.82 (-1.31%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close138.90
Open138.96
Bid0.00 x 1300
Ask0.00 x 2200
Day's range136.52 - 139.05
52-week range93.96 - 139.54
Volume20,020,588
Avg. volume23,977,875
Market cap1.05T
Beta (3Y monthly)1.02
PE ratio (TTM)30.46
EPS (TTM)4.50
Earnings date18 Jul 2019
Forward dividend & yield1.84 (1.32%)
Ex-dividend date2019-08-14
1y target est146.84
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Chart: We're all spending less time on email, and that's good for Slack
    Yahoo Finance11 hours ago

    Chart: We're all spending less time on email, and that's good for Slack

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  • Qualtrics' Julie Larson-Green will talk experience management at TC Sessions: Enterprise
    TechCrunch14 hours ago

    Qualtrics' Julie Larson-Green will talk experience management at TC Sessions: Enterprise

    Ifthat name sounds familiar to you, it's most likely because you remember herfrom her 25 years at Microsoft

  • Xbox Announces Special Edition Xbox One X NBA® 2K20 Console Bundle Featuring Basketball Superstar Anthony Davis
    Business Wire7 hours ago

    Xbox Announces Special Edition Xbox One X NBA® 2K20 Console Bundle Featuring Basketball Superstar Anthony Davis

    Xbox today announced the Xbox One X NBA® 2K20 Special Edition bundle, offering fans the best value in games and entertainment alongside the opportunity to experience the series that’s creating what’s next in basketball culture. The special bundle features the newest Los Angeles Lakers and NBA® 2K20 cover star, Anthony Davis, who appeared today at the Microsoft Lounge to unveil a larger-than-life-size Microsoft Xbox One X with custom artwork. At the event, Davis went head-to-head with popular NBA 2K insider, Ronnie 2K, in an NBA 2K19 showdown on Xbox One X. Davis showed off his moves in true 4K on the world’s most powerful console.

  • Microsoft (MSFT) Q4 2019 Earnings Preview: Cloud, Computing & More
    Zacks7 hours ago

    Microsoft (MSFT) Q4 2019 Earnings Preview: Cloud, Computing & More

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  • Bloomberg9 hours ago

    Facebook Denies App Changes to Avoid Breakup: Antitrust Update

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. technology giants are headed for their biggest antitrust showdown with Congress in 20 years as lawmakers and regulators demand to know whether companies like Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Facebook Inc. use their dominance to squelch innovation. The House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee is holding a hearing Tuesday on the market power of the largest tech companies. Executives from Apple Inc., Amazon.com Inc., Google and Facebook are testifying. Here’s the latest from the committee room:Facebook Denies Its Integration Plan Designed to Thwart Breakup (5:37 p.m.)Facebook’s Matt Perault denied that the company’s planned integration of its Messenger app, its WhatsApp chat service and its Instagram photo app was designed to thwart calls to break up the properties.“There are many services in the market that offer more privacy-protective services,” he told Democratic Representative Jamie Raskin of Maryland. “Our pivot toward privacy with respect to inter-operating our services was because of the competition that we faced in the market.”Raskin had suggested the announcement was a “ploy” and said it coincided with growing calls to break up Facebook by splitting off WhatsApp and Instagram.Democrat David Cicilline, who chairs the panel, also asked Amazon lawyer Nate Sutton about reports that the fees merchants must pay have been increasing in recent years.“Aren’t these steady fee hikes by Amazon a pure exercise of its outsize buyer power?” Cicilline asked.Sutton said that the estimates weren’t accurate.“The fees that are necessary to be paid in our store to sell items have actually been steady for a number of years and slightly declining,” Sutton told Cicilline.Heated Exchange Over Amazon’s Third-Party Sellers (4:32 p.m.)Democrat David Cicilline of Rhode Island, who is chairing the hearing, pressed Amazon on whether its business model suffers from a conflict of interest because it sells its own products that compete directly against those from third-party sellers. That is a complaint also raised by Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren.“You are selling your own products on a platform you control and they’re competing with products from other sellers,” Cicilline said.Amazon lawyer Nate Sutton said it’s common in retail for stores to sell their own brands that compete against others.Cicilline fired back: “The difference is Amazon is a trillion-dollar company that runs an online platform with real-time data on millions of purchases and billions of commerce and can manipulate algorithms on its platform and favor its own product -- that is not the same as a local retailer,” he said.Cicilline repeatedly pressed Sutton about whether the company uses data on the third-party sellers to advantage its own products. Sutton said Amazon ranks results by the same criteria and doesn’t use data to compete against sellers.“You do collect enormous data,” Cicilline said. “You’re saying you don’t use that in any way to promote Amazon products, and I remind you sir, you’re under oath.”Cicilline says companies have de facto ‘immunity’ (3:38 p.m.)Cicilline slammed the dominance of the tech companies, saying they are shielded from competitive threats because of barriers to rivals that could potentially take them on. They also use their resources to prevent startups from challenging them and pose a risk to small businesses, he said.Cicilline said the dominance of tech companies stems from policy choices. Antitrust enforcers haven’t challenged a single one of their acquisitions or sued them for anticompetitive conduct like they did with Microsoft Corp. 20 years ago, he said.“Congress and antitrust enforcers allowed these firms to regulate themselves with little oversight,” Cicilline said in his opening remarks. “As a result, the internet has become increasingly concentrated, less open, and growingly hostile to innovation and entrepreneurship.”“Together, these enforcement decisions have created a de facto immunity for online platforms,” Cicilline added.Companies argue they face widespread competition (2:56 p.m.)The four tech giants tried to head off criticism that they dominate their respective markets, as executives in prepared testimony all cited intense competition they say they face from rivals.Nate Sutton, a lawyer for Amazon, which controls about half of U.S. e-commerce sales, told the House antitrust panel that the company makes up just 4% of U.S. retail sales, with competition from Walmart Inc. and Kroger Co.Facebook’s Director of Public Policy Matt Perault pointed to competition from Apple, Amazon and Google, among others, in his remarks.The companies also touted their development of innovative products that have won over consumers and their investment in research and development. Google’s director of economic policy, Adam Cohen, said the company spent $21.4 billion on R&D, three times more than in 2013.The hearing, led by Cicilline, started at about 3 p.m. Dozens of people were waiting in line to get into the hearing room.Here’s What Tech Faces in Washington:The hearing is one of a several that big tech companies face this week in Congress as Washington calls the giants to task for a range of concerns. President Donald Trump is pressuring the companies in Twitter barrages for issues including anti-conservative bias, while the Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission have taken the first steps toward investigating their conduct. The Justice Department is taking responsibility for scrutiny of Google and Apple, as the FTC oversees Facebook and Amazon.Also on Tuesday, David Marcus, who leads Facebook’s Libra and block chain efforts, heard from disdainful Democrats at a Senate Banking Committee hearing on the company’s proposed cryptocurrency.Trump said Tuesday morning that his administration will look into allegations by billionaire Peter Thiel that Google’s work with China is “seemingly treasonous.”Trump has also said he wants gather tech executives at the White House.Google’s global public policy chief is scheduled to testify Tuesday before a Senate hearing focused on allegations the company engages in censorship.More on tech and antitrust: Did Big Tech Get Too Big? U.S. Joins Europe in Asking: QuickTakeTo contact the reporters on this story: David McLaughlin in Washington at dmclaughlin9@bloomberg.net;Ben Brody in Washington at btenerellabr@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sara Forden at sforden@bloomberg.net, Molly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The 5 Hottest Earnings Charts This Week
    Zacks9 hours ago

    The 5 Hottest Earnings Charts This Week

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  • Google Protest Leader Leaves, Warns of Company's Unchecked Power
    Bloomberg9 hours ago

    Google Protest Leader Leaves, Warns of Company's Unchecked Power

    (Bloomberg) -- Meredith Whittaker, who helped lead employee protests at Google over the search giant’s military work, artificial intelligence and policies, is leaving the company.In a blog, she warned that the internet giant’s AI software and huge computing resources are helping it expand in unsettling ways."Google, in the conventional pursuit of quarterly earnings, is gaining significant and largely unchecked power to impact our world (including in profoundly dangerous ways, such as accelerating the extraction of fossil fuels and the deployment of surveillance technology)," she wrote in a blog on Tuesday. "How this vast power is used — who benefits and who bears the risk — is one of the most urgent social and political (and yes, technical) questions of our time."Whittaker helped spark a broader uprising among workers at some of the world’s largest technology companies, including Alphabet Inc.’s Google, Microsoft Corp. and Amazon.com Inc. They are concerned these corporations are gaining too much power through AI-powered, machine-based decision making that has flaws and little or no accountability.Over the past year, some staff at Google erupted in protest, prompting the company to drop a Pentagon AI contract and a censored search project in China. Whittaker, who led Google’s Open Research group, was one of the most outspoken voices. She was one of six women who organized massive walkouts after reports that Google paid handsome sums to executives accused of sexual harassment.Other Google protesters were saddened by Whittaker’s resignation, but hopeful that their attempts to hold large tech companies accountable will continue."Our movement has moved into a new phase," said Irene Knapp, a senior software engineer at Google. "Those of us who remain at the company have been focused on disseminating knowledge and teaching our organizing skills to new people. I am sure that Meredith would not be leaving if she didn’t know that she’s accomplished that, and I know that I very much feel she has. We’re set up for the long haul."While at Google, Whittaker also served with AI Now, a research institute at New York University that she co-founded. The group often criticizes businesses and government agencies for using AI systems, like facial recognition, in policing and surveillance. Whittaker also publicly denounced some Google decisions, including the appointment of Kay Coles James, a conservative think tank leader, to an AI ethics board. Google soon nixed the board."People in the AI field who know the limitations of this tech, and the shaky foundation on which these grand claims are perched, need to speak up, loudly. The consequences of this kind of BS marketing are deadly (if profitable for a few)," Whittaker wrote on Twitter on Sunday.In April, about six months after the big employee walkout, Whittaker and another protest leader, Claire Stapleton, said the company was retaliating against them for their role in the activity. In an email to colleagues, Whittaker said her Google manager told her to "abandon [her] work on AI ethics" and blocked a request to transfer internally. At the time, Google denied it retaliated against Whittaker.To contact the reporters on this story: Mark Bergen in San Francisco at mbergen10@bloomberg.net;Joshua Brustein in New York at jbrustein@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Alistair Barr, Andrew PollackFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Microsoft Teams Has 13 Million Daily Users. That's Bad News for Slack
    Motley Fool10 hours ago

    Microsoft Teams Has 13 Million Daily Users. That's Bad News for Slack

    Microsoft's communication tool was a few years behind Slack, but it's quickly become a formidable opponent.

  • Motley Fool11 hours ago

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  • DXC & Microsoft Strengthen Deal for Digital Transformation
    Zacks12 hours ago

    DXC & Microsoft Strengthen Deal for Digital Transformation

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  • 4 More Analysts Initiate Coverage on Slack
    Motley Fool12 hours ago

    4 More Analysts Initiate Coverage on Slack

    This round of new ratings isn't as bullish as yesterday's.

  • Motley Fool14 hours ago

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  • United Airlines, Peabody Energy, IBM, Microsoft and Netflix highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day
    Zacks16 hours ago

    United Airlines, Peabody Energy, IBM, Microsoft and Netflix highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

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  • Dell and Microsoft pour millions into A.I. start-ups that are reshaping the workforce
    CNBC16 hours ago

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    Dell and Microsoft venture capital arms are investing in AI start-ups that have products to help companies manage data and harness machine learning to gain a competitive advantage.

  • The 2 Safest Dividend Stocks on the Planet
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  • Tech Giants Brace for Washington Showdown in Echo of Bill Gates
    Bloomberg22 hours ago

    Tech Giants Brace for Washington Showdown in Echo of Bill Gates

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. technology giants are headed for their biggest antitrust showdown with Congress in 20 years as lawmakers and regulators demand to know whether companies like Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Facebook Inc. use their dominance to squelch innovation.Executives from Google, Facebook, Apple Inc. and Amazon.com Inc. are set to appear Tuesday before the House antitrust panel, whose Democratic chairman is leading an investigation into the market power of the biggest tech companies and their effect on competition.The hearing harkens back to Microsoft Corp. co-founder Bill Gates’ appearance before the Senate in 1998 when Microsoft was the target of government scrutiny into its monopoly in computer operating systems. Two months later, the Justice Department filed a landmark antitrust lawsuit against Microsoft that reined in its practices and nearly led to the company’s breakup.“This is really a deep dive by the committee to understand what’s going on in the tech sector, what needs to be done in terms of antitrust enforcement but also to understand better whether there is a need for change in the law,” said Gene Kimmelman, a senior adviser at the policy group Public Knowledge, who served in the Justice Department’s antitrust division under President Barack Obama.While the executives testifying Tuesday don’t have the star power of Gates, their appearance marks the first time the largest technology companies will face questions from lawmakers amid a rising chorus of criticism that they are violating antitrust laws. That was the same accusation leveled at Microsoft two decades ago.Rhode Island Democrat David Cicilline, who leads the antitrust panel, is bearing down on technology companies as antitrust enforcers prepare their own scrutiny of the industry. The Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission, which share antitrust jurisdiction, have taken the first steps toward investigating conduct by the biggest companies, with the Justice Department taking responsibility for Google and Apple, and FTC overseeing Facebook and Amazon.For more: Far From Silicon Valley, Trustbusters Plotted Big Tech AssaultTuesday’s hearing will focus on innovation and entrepreneurship. One of the key complaints from critics of the big tech companies is that they can use their power to thwart competition from smaller rivals. Academic research has shown a steady decline in business start-ups across the economy. One possible explanation is that rising market concentration across industries effectively shuts out entry by new businesses.While some barriers to competition are inherent in any business, the key question for the antitrust committee is whether and how dominant tech platforms can intentionally raise barriers to new entrants, said Michael Kades, the director of markets and competition policy at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth.A report by the University of Chicago’s Stigler Center this year found that digital markets tend to be winner-take-all in which one firm comes to dominate. That creates an incentive for the companies to edge out new challengers that could threaten that dominance.Lack of competition can lead to reduced innovation, which harms consumers over time, according to the report. “The evidence thus far does suggest that current digital platforms face very little threat of entry and are negatively impacting investment in key digital areas,” it said.For more: YouTube’s Trampled Foes Plot Antitrust RevengeOne of the authors of the Chicago report -- Yale University economist Fiona Scott Morton -- will testify Tuesday. The company executives scheduled to appear are Adam Cohen, Google’s director of economic policy, Matt Perault, head of global policy development at Facebook, Amazon associate general counsel for competition Nate Sutton, and Kyle Andeer, vice president of corporate law at Apple.E-commerce trade association NetChoice, which includes Google and Facebook, will tell the committee a different story: The reach of tech platforms gives small businesses the opportunity to target large audiences of potential customers through digital advertising. Not long ago, their only choice was expensive advertising in a local newspaper or television station, the group said.“These platforms are helping small businesses the same way a large retailer operates as an anchor for a shopping center or mall,” Carl Szabo, vice president of NetChoice, will say, according to his prepared remarks. “The larger these platforms grow means the more customers small businesses can reach with better targeting and lower costs.”Sarah Miller, deputy director of Open Markets Institute, which advocates for aggressive antitrust enforcement, countered that tech platforms are harming entrepreneurs.“These companies were the darlings of most Democrats and now the dynamic has changed profoundly,” she said. “There is really a period of learning going on in Congress, with staffers, with the broader public, around the varying ways that all of these tech companies, these tech monopolies, are destructive.”To contact the reporters on this story: David McLaughlin in Washington at dmclaughlin9@bloomberg.net;Ben Brody in Washington, D.C. at btenerellabr@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sara Forden at sforden@bloomberg.net, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Investing.comyesterday

    Stocks - U.S. Futures Flat Despite JPM, J&J Earnings Beats

    Investing.com - U.S. futures were flat on Tuesday, uninspired by earnings from JPMorgan and Johnson&Johnson; that both beat expectations.

  • Slack CEO says he doesn't see Microsoft's reach as a threat
    CNBCyesterday

    Slack CEO says he doesn't see Microsoft's reach as a threat

    Microsoft's considerable reach into the corporate world isn't something Slack CEO Stewart Butterfield is very concerned about.

  • Too Much Information: Amsterdam Hits Pause on Data-Center Boom
    Bloombergyesterday

    Too Much Information: Amsterdam Hits Pause on Data-Center Boom

    (Bloomberg) -- Amsterdam reckons it has more data centers than any other major city in the world, and that’s turned out to be too much of a good thing.The Dutch capital, which lured tech companies with attractive taxes and relatively cheap electricity, is halting the setting up of any more data centers until the end of the year, saying the speed with which they’ve opened is putting an untenable strain on its property market and power networks.“It is necessary to take a break and formulate policy first, so that we can get a better grip on the location of data centers,” said Mariëtte Sedee, Alderman for Spatial Development, Environment and Agricultural Affairs in Haarlemmermeer, a municipality southwest of Amsterdam.The Amsterdam region, which encompasses a radius of about 50 kilometers (31 miles) around the capital, houses about 70% of the data centers in the Netherlands. The area in and around the city is home to about a third of all data centers in Europe, including those run by Interxion Holding NV and EdgeConnex Inc to E-Shelter UK LTD and NLDC BV. Many of them opened in just the last five years.Tech companies have rushed to build such facilities because businesses and individuals increasingly store data online and want rapid access to it. The push for such centers has also coincided with demand spurred by a vast number of online transactions. The Netherlands is among Europe’s largest fintech hubs, with more than 430 companies active in the market, according to Holland Fintech.Digitization HinderedThe Dutch Data Center Association said it was dismayed by the city government’s decision to suspend data-center investments.“Our excellent data center infrastructure is a magnet for (international) tech companies and brings a lot of employment with it,” the group said in a statement. “We are surprised that a rigorous decision like this is being taken right now and so suddenly.”Big technology companies like Microsoft Corp. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google have built large data centers outside Amsterdam, in Middenmeer and Groningen, while laying a cable to the capital. Microsoft’s regional hub for cloud-computing services is in the Netherlands while Google unveiled plans at the end of June to invest 1 billion euros ($1.1 billion) to expand its data center infrastructure. A new facility will be built in Agriport, about 30 miles north of Amsterdam, while an existing site about 130 miles further north, in Eemshaven, will be expanded.Amsterdam has gone out of its way to lure such companies. The Netherlands also offers a relatively cheap supply of sustainable electricity, according to its foreign investment agency.The suspension of approvals for new data centers is aimed at taking stock of the situation, according to the city government. At present, municipalities have few means at their disposal to steer where data centers are located, or the requirements they must meet, it said. The aim is to ensure data centers occupy as little space as possible and that they fit well -- architecturally -- with the environment, the government concluded.The demand on commercial property and the need for new housing, combined with policies for safeguarding space for other businesses and nature, is putting pressure on Amsterdam’s real estate market. Property prices in Amsterdam have steadily hit records as more companies and people have moved to the city -- many after the Brexit vote in the U.K.[For more on Dutch Housing Turmoil: Amsterdam Housing Market Gets Some Help From Dutch Government.]While the Dutch Data Center Association asserted that its members are at the top of the list in terms of sustainable development “with data centers fully electrified and running for 80% on green energy,” the city says it may need more.“We are going to set requirements in the area of ​​making available residual heat free of charge for the heating of homes and the use of green energy,” said Marieke van Doorninck, Alderman for Sustainability and Spatial Development in Amsterdam.To contact the reporter on this story: Ellen Proper in Amsterdam at eproper@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Anthony Palazzo at apalazzo@bloomberg.net, Vidya Root, Giles TurnerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • NVIDIA Takes the Road Less Traveled in Cloud Gaming
    Motley Foolyesterday

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  • Taiwan Is the Latest Flashpoint in US-China Relations
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  • China’s GDP Falls to 27-Year Low, Worst Yet to Come?
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  • Trump Takes Credit for China’s GDP Growth Weakness
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  • What Should Investors Expect from IBM's Q2 Earnings After Red Hat Deal?
    Zacks2 days ago

    What Should Investors Expect from IBM's Q2 Earnings After Red Hat Deal?

    Shares of IBM (IBM) have easily outpaced the market in 2019 and the firm officially announced the completion of its $34 billion deal to buy Red Hat last week. With this in mind, let's see what investors should expect from the tech firm's Q2 2019 financial results...

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