MTRO.L - Metro Bank PLC

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
203.80
+2.20 (+1.09%)
At close: 4:37PM GMT
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Previous close201.60
Open201.07
Bid202.00 x 0
Ask203.60 x 0
Day's range194.70 - 205.80
52-week range155.20 - 1,549.00
Volume1,251,550
Avg. volume1,672,695
Market cap341.895M
Beta (5Y monthly)N/A
PE ratio (TTM)17.42
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings date23 Oct 2019
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target est2,750.62
  • Why I think Metro Bank’s share price will continue to struggle
    Fool.co.uk

    Why I think Metro Bank’s share price will continue to struggle

    Jabran Khan explores Metro Bank’s rise from challenger bank pioneer to accounting scandals, leadership crisis and plummeting share prices.The post Why I think Metro Bank’s share price will continue to struggle appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Is the Ted Baker share price finally cheap enough to buy?
    Fool.co.uk

    Is the Ted Baker share price finally cheap enough to buy?

    These two big 2019 fallers must surely reach share prices so low they're irresistible, mustn't they?

  • The Kier share price isn’t the only ‘bargain’ I’ll be avoiding in 2020
    Fool.co.uk

    The Kier share price isn’t the only ‘bargain’ I’ll be avoiding in 2020

    Roland Head explains why he's staying away from Kier Group plc (LON: KIE) and two other troubled stocks.

  • Bloomberg

    Banks Are Impossible for Anyone to Understand

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- A simple lesson we should have learned from the financial crisis is that complexity begets abuse, and undermines stability. Yet the key measure we use to determine banks’ health is so fiendishly difficult to understand that outsiders have no choice but to accept what we’re told by the lender.That’s the conclusion of a broad U.K. government review of the audit industry unveiled this week. Donald Brydon, the former chairman of London Stock Exchange Plc who ran the review, considered whether accountants should be brought in to verify how banks calculate the all important “risk-weighted asset” measure. Alarmingly, he concluded that there was no point because even trained auditors would struggle to get their heads around these calculations, unless banks employed an army of them. If that’s true, then what hope for ordinary shareholders or bank supervisors?After all, we’re talking here about the figure that lenders and their regulators use to assess how much capital they need to hold against the risks they’re taking. Worries about divergences in how banks work out risk-weighted assets have already prompted new rules to limit the degree to which they can use their own models. The world’s leading financial regulators have urged the audit profession to help , as has the Institute for Chartered Accountants in England and Wales.Unfortunately, Brydon believes that getting auditors involved is simply not viable. Tucked into his 138-page report, the City grandee concludes that because the models on which risk-weighted asset calculations are based “can run to many hundreds of pages of explanation,” getting auditors to provide opinion on their truth and fairness would "involve a disproportionate additional cost.” And at a practical level, “the depth of skills necessary to undertake such separate assurance are not obviously widespread and readily available,” in the accounting profession, says Brydon. His alternative solution is to get the U.K. banking supervisor, the Prudential Regulation Authority, to issue a letter of comfort as it already reviews the banks’ risk-weighted asset models. But given his admission that this task is beyond the audit profession, it’s not clear why just writing a letter would make bank calculations any more transparent.Moreover, Brydon’s conclusions beg a number of questions. Isn’t the complexity of risk-weighted calculations precisely the reason they should be reviewed externally? If auditors lack the skills, where else is the expertise? Ultimately, shouldn’t we be striving to make these fundamental measures accessible to a wider pool of experts? How can we trust that banks are as safe as they claim to be, and aren’t just gaming the system?This year alone there have been a number of examples of dubious risk-weighted asset calculations. The U.K.’s Metro Bank Plc is being probed by regulators for assigning a weighting that was too low for some assets, an error that — once fixed — led to the bank raising capital. Citigroup Inc. was fined in Britain for inaccurately reporting its capital and liquidity in part because the firm underestimated its risk-weighted assets. Most recently, Coventry Building Society, a U.K. lender, corrected risk weights that inflated its financial strength for years. (The firm was still comfortably above regulatory requirements).While none of these incidents has threatened the viability of any one company, let alone the financial system, institutions are tripping up on an essential reporting requirement that’s too complicated to unpack. As regulatory failings go, this one might easily have dangerous consequences.To contact the author of this story: Elisa Martinuzzi at emartinuzzi@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Elisa Martinuzzi is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering finance. She is a former managing editor for European finance at Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Do I think 2020 will be a better year for the Metro Bank share price?
    Fool.co.uk

    Do I think 2020 will be a better year for the Metro Bank share price?

    While 2019 was a struggle for the challenger bank, does next year offer any hope for Metro Bank shares?

  • Metro Bank's founding chairman Hill steps down as non-executive director
    Reuters

    Metro Bank's founding chairman Hill steps down as non-executive director

    Metro Bank had said in October that Hill, who quit as chairman but agreed to accept an honorary position, would remain a non-executive director of the bank until Dec. 31. Chief Executive Officer Craig Donaldson is also leaving the company after a torrid year in which the British lender was engulfed in a damaging accounting scandal that wiped 90% off its market value.

  • My best stock tips of 2019
    Fool.co.uk

    My best stock tips of 2019

    What were your best stock calls in 2019? Here are three of mine that turned out right.

  • What to Watch: Metro Bank CEO quits, AJ Bell's strong year, and Daily Mail profits slips
    Yahoo Finance UK

    What to Watch: Metro Bank CEO quits, AJ Bell's strong year, and Daily Mail profits slips

    A daily overview of the top business, market, and economic stories to watch in the UK, Europe, and abroad.

  • Metro Bank CEO Donaldson follows chairman out of door
    Reuters

    Metro Bank CEO Donaldson follows chairman out of door

    Donaldson, who has been in the role since 2009 and is one of Britain's longest-serving bank CEOs, will be succeeded on an interim basis by Chief Transformation Officer Dan Frumkin from the start of next year, Metro said in a statement. Metro said in October its chairman and founder Vernon Hill had quit two months early and warned it may have to curb its growth plans after posting a third quarter loss. The bank is under investigation by regulators after disclosing it had under-reported its exposure to higher-risk loans by almost 1 billion pounds ($1.28 billion).

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 2-Metro Bank CEO Donaldson follows chairman out of door

    Metro Bank chief executive Craig Donaldson is leaving after a torrid year in which the British lender was engulfed in a damaging accounting scandal that has also cost it its chairman and wiped 90% off its market value. Donaldson, who has been in the role since 2009 and is one of Britain's longest-serving bank CEOs, will be succeeded on an interim basis by Chief Transformation Officer Dan Frumkin from the start of next year, Metro said in a statement. The bank is under investigation by regulators after disclosing it had under-reported its exposure to higher-risk loans by almost 1 billion pounds ($1.28 billion).

  • Have Insiders Been Buying Metro Bank PLC (LON:MTRO) Shares This Year?
    Simply Wall St.

    Have Insiders Been Buying Metro Bank PLC (LON:MTRO) Shares This Year?

    We've lost count of how many times insiders have accumulated shares in a company that goes on to improve markedly. The...

  • Why I think the Metro Bank share price could double in 2020
    Fool.co.uk

    Why I think the Metro Bank share price could double in 2020

    Rupert Hargreaves explains what Metro Bank needs to do to make a comeback in 2020.

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