NC0B.F - News Corporation

Frankfurt - Frankfurt Delayed price. Currency in EUR
11.80
+0.10 (+0.85%)
At close: 9:02AM CET
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close11.70
Open11.80
Bid12.10 x 70000
Ask12.20 x 70000
Day's range11.80 - 11.80
52-week range9.74 - 13.46
Volume1,000
Avg. volume15
Market cap7.01B
Beta (3Y monthly)1.47
PE ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-0.30
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield0.18 (1.55%)
Ex-dividend date2019-09-10
1y target estN/A
  • States Step Up Google Scrutiny Over Antitrust Issues
    Bloomberg

    States Step Up Google Scrutiny Over Antitrust Issues

    (Bloomberg) -- State officials investigating Alphabet Inc.’s Google met Monday to dive into competition issues surrounding the search giant as they press forward with an investigation into whether the company is violating antitrust laws, according to people familiar with the matter.The officials met privately in Denver with outside experts with the goal of gaining a deeper understanding of Google’s businesses and the dynamics of the markets it operates in, including digital advertising, said one of the people.The gathering comes two months after all but two states opened an antitrust investigation into Google with an initial focus on its advertising practices, according to an investigative demand sent to the company. Publishers have long complained that Google’s dominance in the technology that delivers ads across the web harms competition.The meeting was similar to one held last month in New York where state officials met with experts about Facebook Inc. The social media giant is under investigation by 45 states, Guam and the District of Columbia.One of the aims of the Google meeting was to help state officials prepare for an investigation that will likely present challenging competition issues, said one of the people. The states were also planning to map out a strategy for dividing the workload of the investigation, said two of the people.Among those advising the states is Cristina Caffarra, an economist at Charles River Associates. Google has complained about Caffarra’s work for the state because of her past work for Google adversaries News Corp., Microsoft Corp., and Russia’s Yandex NV.The states are investigating Google in parallel to a Justice Department antitrust probe of the company. The House Judiciary Committee’s antitrust panel is also conducting an inquiry into Google and other large tech companies.(Updates from fifth paragraph with challenges of the antitrust investigation. A previous version of this story was corrected to clarify the number of states and attorneys general investigating.)To contact the reporters on this story: David McLaughlin in Washington at dmclaughlin9@bloomberg.net;Ben Brody in Washington, D.C. at btenerellabr@bloomberg.net;Naomi Nix in Washington at nnix1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sara Forden at sforden@bloomberg.net, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 'The true religion of America': Why one TV mogul is going all in on sports
    Yahoo Finance

    'The true religion of America': Why one TV mogul is going all in on sports

    As streaming has turned the television industry on its head, one media mogul went against the trend this year. He revealed the advice from News Corp. Founder Rupert Murdoch by way of Oracle CEO Larry Ellison that led him to do it.

  • Antitrust Probe Flames Tense Google-News Corp Relationship
    Market Realist

    Antitrust Probe Flames Tense Google-News Corp Relationship

    Google (GOOGL) seems uncomfortable with experts and critics' involvement in the ongoing state-led antitrust problem of its business practices.

  • Bloomberg

    Google Protests News Corp., Microsoft Ties in Texas Probe

    (Bloomberg) -- Google says its confidential business information is at risk in the nationwide antitrust probe of the company because the Texas attorney general’s office, which is leading the investigation, hired two consultants that have worked for Google adversaries.Parent company Alphabet Inc. went to court Thursday to restrict Texas’s ability to disclose sensitive information to consultants who have worked for competitors and other companies such as News Corp. and Microsoft Corp. that have complained about Google to regulators.Google specifically cited the hiring of Cristina Caffarra, an economist with consulting firm Charles River Associates who has worked for Google adversaries News Corp., Microsoft, and Russia’s Yandex NV, according to the court filing in Texas.Caffarra is providing Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton’s office with “expert examinations, observations, opinions, consultations, analyses, reports, testimony, and other services,” according to a contract released by the state. She is working for free, according to her contract.The arrangement, Google said in court papers, “creates a significant risk that Google’s confidential business information could be inappropriately disclosed to and used by its adversaries.”“We’ve provided millions of pages of documents in response to regulatory inquiries, and we’re committed to cooperating,” Google said in a statement. “But this is an extraordinarily irregular arrangement and it’s only fair to have assurances that our confidential business information won’t be shared with competitors or vocal complainants.”A spokesman for the attorney general said the office has been engaged in “good-faith” negotiations with Google to protect the company’s sensitive business information.“While these negotiations were ongoing, Google, without any notice, made a lengthy court filing challenging our right to employ many of the most knowledgeable in this complex field,” Marc Rylander, the Texas AG’s spokesman, said in an email. “Google is not entitled to choose the states’ expert or run the states’ investigation.”The fight over the consultants comes after Paxton’s office issued a civil investigative demand to Google in September seeking detailed information about the company’s advertising business.Google said in court papers it’s not seeking to bar disclosure of business information to any Texas consultant who has worked for a rival or complaining company, only those who are currently employed by them. Consultants who are likely to work for Google competitors should not be able to work for them during the states’ investigation and one year afterward, Google said.The company is also unhappy with Paxton’s hiring of Eugene Burrus, a former assistant general counsel at Microsoft who is now an adviser at McKinsey & Co. Microsoft was a longtime foe of Google and advocated in the U.S. and Europe for antitrust action against the company. Burrus also represented clients in antitrust cases against Google, the company said. His maximum fee is $75,000, according to his contract.“Absent appropriate limitations, Mr. Burrus likely will attempt to use his experience on this investigation, including his access to confidential Google information, to market himself to prospective clients with interests adverse to Google,” the company said.Caffarra, News Corp. and Microsoft declined to comment. Burrus didn’t immediately respond to a message sent to him on LinkedIn.Google is asking the Texas court for a protective order including advance notice of third parties accessing its confidential information and limits to Texas’s ability to disclose company information to competitors and consultants.The company was due to begin delivering documents to Texas in early November, according to a person familiar with the matter. The request, which will go to a judge, could delay that, said the person, who asked not to be named discussing sensitive matter.Google may offer to start handing over documents as long as Paxton’s office doesn’t share the material with third parties until the matter is resolved, the person added.(Updates with comments from Texas AG’s spokesman in the seventh paragraph.)\--With assistance from Gerry Smith.To contact the reporters on this story: David McLaughlin in Washington at dmclaughlin9@bloomberg.net;Ben Brody in Washington, D.C. at btenerellabr@bloomberg.net;Mark Bergen in San Francisco at mbergen10@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sara Forden at sforden@bloomberg.net, Mark Niquette, Andrew PollackFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Facebook Launches News Section to Compensate Publishers

    (Bloomberg) -- Facebook Inc. introduced a separate news section in its flagship app, offering users more control over articles they see and providing money to the publishers whose stories are featured.The section, called Facebook News, helps the social-media giant stem criticism on two fronts: It’s an effort to combat misinformation and could improve relationships with media companies, which have complained that Facebook profits from selling advertising alongside their articles.Facebook News debuts Friday to some users in the U.S. It will feature articles chosen partly by Facebook employees who “will be free from editorial intervention by anyone at the company.” The section also will be personalized based on news that users prefer and they can hide articles, topics or publishers they don’t want to see.The section will include stories from about 200 publishers, including national outlets like the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, NBC News and ABC News, and local outlets in big cities such as the Chicago Tribune and Dallas Morning News. It also will feature conservative-leaning sites, including Breitbart News.“We worked really hard to honor their business model and recognize the importance of original reporting,” Campbell Brown, who oversees news partnerships at Facebook, said in an interview.At an event hosted by Twitter on Thursday, New York Times Chief Operating Officer Meredith Kopit Levien said “it’s a welcome development for any platform to be compensating the publisher for use of the content in any form.”A Times spokeswoman confirmed the newspaper’s participation in Facebook’s news section early Friday by email. “Facebook News should make quality news easier to find in the Facebook environment and easier to distinguish from other forms of content,” said the spokeswoman, Danielle Rhoades Ha.Bloomberg also is participating in Facebook News.Facebook executives say they chose the publishers based on surveys that found users want more articles on entertainment, health, business and sports. It also picked outlets that adhere to Facebook’s guidelines, weeding out those that serve misinformation, hate speech or clickbait. News articles will still appear in Facebook’s main News Feed.Peace Offering?To some publishers, Facebook’s new initiative amounts to a goodwill gesture after years of tensions. In the past, Facebook has asked them to dedicate resources to produce work for a new initiative like Facebook Live, then left them frustrated when the social-media company shifted strategies.“This is the first time we’re going to be forming long-term, stable relationships with publishers,” Facebook Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg said. “For the first time we’re making multi-year financial commitments.”Facebook is paying some publishers $1 million to $3 million a year to put their articles in the new section. In most cases, links in the new section will take readers back to publishers’ websites, which helps them attract advertising and subscriptions. That’s different from other Facebook initiatives, like Instant Articles, which kept readers on the main site.Zuckerberg spoke at an event in New York at the Paley Center for Media, where he was in friendly conversation with Robert Thomson, CEO of News Corp. Thomson and his boss, News Corp. Executive Chairman Rupert Murdoch, have been among Facebook’s loudest critics, calling on the company to pay media companies for articles the way that a cable-TV company pays Walt Disney Co. to carry ESPN.Facebook users want to see their friends and family in their news feeds, Zuckerberg said, and that they don’t have a lot of room there for high-quality news content. That’s why it’s better to have a separate tab, which will definitely draw a smaller audience, maybe 10% to 20% of the main feed, but that will still be significant. Facebook is working on similar partnerships around the world.One challenge for Facebook will be getting people to visit the news tab, which will appear at the bottom of the app. It can be hard to change users’ habit of scrolling the News Feed, rather than clicking on a separate tab. Facebook’s streaming video tab, called Facebook Watch, has struggled to gain traction.The news team will have editorial independence when it comes to stories about the company, Brown said. That means they can feature news about Facebook if warranted.“There is a clear separation with regards to the editorial team,” she said. “They have independence and they can curate Facebook and would curate Facebook the way they would any other story.”(Updates with comments from Zuckerberg in 11th paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Gerry Smith in New York at gsmith233@bloomberg.net;Sarah Frier in San Francisco at sfrier1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.net, John J. Edwards IIIFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • News Corp to supply headlines for Facebook's upcoming news tab
    Reuters

    News Corp to supply headlines for Facebook's upcoming news tab

    The WSJ, which first reported about the deal, said news publications Washington Post, BuzzFeed News, and Business Insider have also reached a similar deal with Facebook. The news organizations will be paid a licensing fee to supply headlines, the WSJ reported.

  • Can Knewz by News Corp Challenge Google’s Ad Business?
    Market Realist

    Can Knewz by News Corp Challenge Google’s Ad Business?

    News Corp (NWSA), a longtime Google (GOOGL) critic, wants to take Google on in the online news distribution space. Here's how.

  • Reuters

    News Corp developing 'Knewz.com' service to take on Google News: WSJ

    It will draw from hundreds of news sources, including national outlets such as The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, the Washington Post and NBC News, digital-native players, magazine publishers and local newspapers, the Journal said. News Corp, which owns Dow Jones Newswires, HarperCollins book publishing business and the Wall Street Journal, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

  • News Corporation (A Shares) (NWSA) Q4 2019 Earnings Call Transcript
    Motley Fool

    News Corporation (A Shares) (NWSA) Q4 2019 Earnings Call Transcript

    NWSA earnings call for the period ending June 30, 2019.

  • News Corporation (A Shares) (NWSA) Q3 2019 Earnings Call Transcript
    Motley Fool

    News Corporation (A Shares) (NWSA) Q3 2019 Earnings Call Transcript

    NWSA earnings call for the period ending March 31, 2019.

  • Reuters

    News Corp posts surprise profit as HarperCollins profits grow

    (Reuters) - Wall Street Journal-owner News Corp reported a surprise quarterly profit on Thursday, driven by strong growth in earnings at its book publishing and subscription video services units. Trying ...

  • Associated Press

    News Corp.: Fiscal 3Q Earnings Snapshot

    The New York-based company said it had profit of 2 cents per share. Earnings, adjusted for one-time gains and costs, came to 4 cents per share. The publishing company whose flagship is The Wall Street ...

  • Murdoch’s Wall Street Journal Joins Apple’s ‘Netflix for News’
    Bloomberg

    Murdoch’s Wall Street Journal Joins Apple’s ‘Netflix for News’

    Eight years after launching an ill-fated digital newspaper for Apple’s iPad, News Corp. is making articles from its flagship newspaper, the Wall Street Journal, available on a new service called Apple News+, which debuted Monday. “It’s going to get our journalism into the hands of millions of Americans who otherwise might not be able to get access to it,” Journal Publisher William Lewis said in an interview.

  • News Corp's Australian arm calls for Google breakup
    Reuters

    News Corp's Australian arm calls for Google breakup

    The Australian arm of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp called for an enforced break-up of Alphabet Inc's Google Inc, acknowledging the measure would involve global coordination but calling it necessary to preserve advertising and the news media. The demand, published on Tuesday as part of a government inquiry, goes beyond the recommendations of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) which crossed swords with Google by requesting a new regulatory body to oversee global tech operators. In an 80-page submission largely centred on Google, News Corp Australia said the U.S. company had created an "ecosystem" where it could control the results of people's internet searches and then charge advertisers based on how many people viewed their advertisements.

  • Murdoch’s News Corp. Australia Asks to Break Up Google
    Bloomberg

    Murdoch’s News Corp. Australia Asks to Break Up Google

    News Corp. made the request in an 80-page filing with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission following a preliminary report from the regulator, recommending a new or existing watchdog should investigate and monitor how large digital platforms rank and display ads and news. In the document, Murdoch’s company criticized the existing practices and power of Google-parent Alphabet Inc. and Facebook Inc., calling for more regulatory oversight. “The market power that Google and Facebook occupy makes it difficult even for sophisticated and experienced businesses like News Corp. Australia to negotiate any terms of business,” the company said in its filing.

By using Yahoo, you agree that we and our partners can use cookies for purposes such as customising content and advertising. See our Privacy Policy to learn more