NC0B.F - News Corporation

Frankfurt - Frankfurt Delayed price. Currency in EUR
11.40
0.00 (0.00%)
As of 8:09AM CEST. Market open.
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Previous close11.40
Open11.40
Bid11.30 x 70000
Ask11.40 x 70000
Day's range11.40 - 11.40
52-week range7.40 - 13.70
Volume1,000
Avg. volume0
Market cap6.803B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.44
PE ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-0.30
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield0.18 (1.67%)
Ex-dividend date10 Mar 2020
1y target estN/A
  • Reuters

    News Corp slashes Australian newspapers, media jobs, in virus downturn

    The Australian arm of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp <NWSA.O> said on Thursday it will stop printing more than 100 regional newspapers after the coronavirus shutdown gutted advertising revenue, accelerating a downturn in the country's media sector. From next month, the company which dominates Australia's media and political landscape said it would take 76 regional mastheads online only and shut another 36 altogether. "Print advertising spending which contributes the majority of our revenues has accelerated its decline," said News Corp Australasia Executive Chairman Michael Miller in a statement.

  • Reuters

    News Corp Australia's push for digitisation to lead to job losses

    Scores of regional and community titles will be published only digitally from June 29 under the reorganisation, the Australian arm of the mass media and publishing firm News Corp <NWSA.O> said in a statement on Wednesday. It said its print publications had become unsustainable amid the coronavirus pandemic and the loss of revenue to digital platforms that use its content without payment. "To meet these changing trends, we are reshaping News Corp Australia to focus on where consumers and businesses are moving and to strengthen our position as Australia’s leading digital news media company," News Corp Australasia Executive Chairman Michael Miller said.

  • Is News Corporation's (NASDAQ:NWSA) CEO Salary Justified?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is News Corporation's (NASDAQ:NWSA) CEO Salary Justified?

    Robert Thomson became the CEO of News Corporation (NASDAQ:NWSA) in 2013. This report will, first, examine the CEO...

  • Why News Corp. Stock Jumped Friday
    Motley Fool

    Why News Corp. Stock Jumped Friday

    What happened Shares of media giant News Corp. (NASDAQ: NWS) (NASDAQ: NWSA) jumped sharply on Friday. Both tickers were up about 13% as of 1:05 p.m. EDT. The stock's gain follows the company's better-than-expected fiscal third-quarter bottom line.

  • News Corporation (NWSA) Q3 Earnings Beat Estimates, Fall Y/Y
    Zacks

    News Corporation (NWSA) Q3 Earnings Beat Estimates, Fall Y/Y

    News Corporation's (NWSA) third-quarter revenues decline on account of fall in subscription revenues at Foxtel and lower print-related advertising revenues at the News and Information Services segment.

  • News Corporation (A Shares) (NWSA) Q3 2020 Earnings Call Transcript
    Motley Fool

    News Corporation (A Shares) (NWSA) Q3 2020 Earnings Call Transcript

    Thank you very much, Hello, everyone, and welcome to News Corp's fiscal third-quarter 2020 earnings call. On the call today are Robert Thomson, chief executive; and Susan Panuccio, chief financial officer.

  • Rupert Murdoch gives up bonus after News Corp post $1 bln loss
    Reuters

    Rupert Murdoch gives up bonus after News Corp post $1 bln loss

    The company's chief executive officer, Robert Thomson, who is giving up three-quarters of his annual cash bonus, said on Thursday News Corp would cut costs in all its units as it tries to limit the hit of the pandemic on its business. "The collective cuts in bonuses and other cost initiatives will have a positive impact on profitability and our cash position," Thomson said in a statement.

  • News Corp. (NWSA) Q3 Earnings Surpass Estimates
    Zacks

    News Corp. (NWSA) Q3 Earnings Surpass Estimates

    News Corp. (NWSA) delivered earnings and revenue surprises of 50.00% and -1.85%, respectively, for the quarter ended March 2020. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?

  • News Corp Announces New Performance Records At Dow Jones, The Wall Street Journal, Amid Increased Demand For Trusted News, Data And Analysis
    Business Wire

    News Corp Announces New Performance Records At Dow Jones, The Wall Street Journal, Amid Increased Demand For Trusted News, Data And Analysis

    News Corp announced today that Dow Jones set new performance records in the third quarter of fiscal 2020, meeting a growing global need for fact-based reporting and high quality data and analysis.

  • Rupert Murdoch gives up bonus after News Corp post $1 billion loss
    Reuters

    Rupert Murdoch gives up bonus after News Corp post $1 billion loss

    The company's chief executive officer, Robert Thomson, who is giving up three-quarters of his annual cash bonus, said on Thursday News Corp would cut costs in all its units as it tries to limit the hit of the pandemic on its business. "The collective cuts in bonuses and other cost initiatives will have a positive impact on profitability and our cash position," Thomson said in a statement.

  • News Corporation Reports Third Quarter Results for Fiscal 2020
    Business Wire

    News Corporation Reports Third Quarter Results for Fiscal 2020

    News Corporation ("News Corp" or the "Company") (Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA; ASX: NWS, NWSLV) today reported financial results for the three months ended March 31, 2020.

  • News Corp Appoints Almar Latour as CEO of Dow Jones, Publisher of The Wall Street Journal
    Business Wire

    News Corp Appoints Almar Latour as CEO of Dow Jones, Publisher of The Wall Street Journal

    News Corp announced today the appointment of Almar Latour as the new Chief Executive Officer of Dow Jones and Publisher of The Wall Street Journal.

  • Reuters

    Former CBS News president returns to News Corp to help Murdoch's UK operations

    The source confirmed a report in the New York Times, which said that Rhodes' return stoked speculation he could play a role at Fox News. Rhodes's current role is unrelated to Fox News, the source said. News UK includes the Times of London, The Sunday Times, The Sun newspapers, and Virgin Radio, talkSPORT and talkRADIO, which include video offerings on YouTube.

  • Activist Hohn Calls on Wirecard to Remove CEO Markus Braun
    Bloomberg

    Activist Hohn Calls on Wirecard to Remove CEO Markus Braun

    (Bloomberg) -- Billionaire activist investor Christopher Hohn has called on Wirecard AG to remove Chief Executive Officer Markus Braun after an independent audit of past revenues criticized the German payments processor for internal “shortcomings.”The probe by KPMG was unable to obtain the data needed to verify revenues of 1 billion euros ($1.1 billion) in transactions with third parties. Wirecard hired the accounting firm in October to look into its third-party partner business as well as operations in India and Singapore following a series of reports by the Financial Times that accused the company of accounting fraud in several countries.Shares in Wirecard fell 12.6% in early trading in Frankfurt, taking the drop since start of trading Tuesday to 37%.Given management didn’t provide KPMG with the necessary documentation to verify the revenue, “we are of the view that the supervisory board is legally obliged to intervene,” Hohn’s TCI Fund Management Ltd. said in a letter also posted on its website.“In our opinion, the necessary intervention is now to remove the CEO from all management duties,” TCI said. Failing that, the board must take responsibility for the investigation and remove Wirecard’s management from involvement in the audit until the allegations have been resolved, it said.TCI has a short position in Wirecard, equivalent to 1.04% of the company’s stock.Hohn’s hedge fund, which managed about $30 billion before suffering its steepest ever monthly decline in March, specializes in taking large stakes in companies and agitating for change to boost the firms’ share prices.His bets have included companies such as ABN Amro Bank NV, News Corp. and most recently some attempted agitation against the London Stock Exchange Group Plc.The tactic has worked well for TCI -- it’s made money every year since 2008. It gained 41% in 2019, its best annual performance in six years.(Updates with share price, corrects company name.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • News Corp to Report Fiscal 2020 Third Quarter Earnings
    Business Wire

    News Corp to Report Fiscal 2020 Third Quarter Earnings

    News Corp will release its third quarter Fiscal 2020 results on Thursday, May 7, 2020. News Corp Chief Executive Robert Thomson and Chief Financial Officer Susan Panuccio will host a call with analysts and media to discuss the results at 5:oo p.m. EDT (Sydney: Friday, May 8, at 7:oo a.m. AEST). Reporters are invited to join the call on a listen-only basis.

  • News Corp sees hit to ad revenue from coronavirus pandemic
    Reuters

    News Corp sees hit to ad revenue from coronavirus pandemic

    Readers are flocking to news outlets for information about the pandemic, but ad revenue has still plummeted for many publishers as companies slash marketing budgets and hesitate to have their brands advertised near coronavirus coverage. News Corp said book publishing sales and revenue from video subscription services would also likely be dented as brick-and-mortar retail stores are shuttered and sporting events that it broadcasts are canceled or postponed. A representative for Reuters news organization previously said the company has also experienced an impact on advertising revenue.

  • Will Lewis to Depart Post at Dow Jones
    Business Wire

    Will Lewis to Depart Post at Dow Jones

    News Corp announced today that Will Lewis will be departing as CEO of Dow Jones and Publisher of The Wall Street Journal. Mr. Lewis will continue to work with his team through the current COVID-19 crisis for the next month, while a successor will be announced in the coming weeks.

  • News Corp Announces Sale of News America Marketing to Charlesbank Capital Partners
    Business Wire

    News Corp Announces Sale of News America Marketing to Charlesbank Capital Partners

    News Corp today announced that it has entered into a definitive agreement to sell its News America Marketing business ("NAM") to Charlesbank Capital Partners, a private equity firm with offices in Boston and New York.

  • Bloomberg

    AT&T Is Cooperating With Justice Department in Google Probe

    (Bloomberg) -- AT&T Inc. is cooperating with the U.S. Justice Department in its Google investigation, which is exploring whether the online search and advertising giant violated antitrust laws, according to a person familiar to the situation.The discussions are part of a probe into Google’s digital advertising and search operations, and antitrust officials have been meeting with a range of parties, people with knowledge of the matter have said previously. That includes discussions with companies and organizations other than those that have voiced complaints about google in the past, such as Oracle Corp., News Corp. and Yelp Inc.Google controls much of the technology that online publishers and marketers use to serve ads across the internet. Media companies and rivals have complained that Google’s dominance hinders competition, and its business practices have brought scrutiny in both the U.S. and Europe.The Justice Department said it doesn’t comment on specific investigations or meetings.“As a general matter, it is usual for the department’s antitrust division to meet with a range of third parties during an investigation,” it said in a statement. “The department takes protecting the privacy of third parties seriously so as to protect them from any potential retribution from the target.”The Wall Street Journal reported earlier on AT&T’s talks with the Justice Department.The company had its own clash with the Justice Department starting in 2017, when antitrust enforcers sued to block AT&T’s $85 billion acquisition of Time Warner. But the telecom carrier ultimately prevailed and was able to close the transaction the following year.AT&T has pushed deeper into online ads in recent years, putting it in Google’s orbit. It agreed to buy AppNexus in 2018, giving it an online-ad exchange that is now part of a business AT&T calls Xandr. AppNexus has been a frequent critic of Google’s practices.(Updates with Justice Department comment in fourth paragraph)\--With assistance from David McLaughlin.To contact the reporter on this story: Scott Moritz in New York at smoritz6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.net, Jillian WardFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    Australian news agency AAP to close, losing online media battle

    Australian Associated Press (AAP) will close its news production and sub-editing businesses from June after losing its battle to compete with free online publishers, the 85-year old wire-service said on Tuesday. AAP had for decades provided media organisations first-account reports and breaking news on topics ranging from politics, to business and sports. "Its reporters, photographers and production staff have accurately recorded the first cut of contemporary Australian history and the nation is in their debt," AAP chairman Campbell Reid, who is also a News Corp executive, said in a statement.

  • Bloomberg

    The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of the Coronavirus Response

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Look for this week to be full of news about governments and central banks signaling their “whatever it takes” willingness to take additional policy measures to fight the contractionary impact of the coronavirus on virtually every economy around the world. Already, the Federal Reserve signaled on Friday readiness to loosen monetary conditions in the United States while Italy announced on Sunday a “shock therapy” of fiscal measures.As more announcements materialize during the week, it will be crystal clear that the question will not be about the willingness to act but about the effectiveness of those actions. For the most part, the answer will be only partly satisfactory in the short term until two underlying health conditions change. Less obvious will be the need to weigh immediate benefits — partial and as necessary as they are — against the possibility of longer-term unintended consequences associated with the inevitable use of ill-suited policy tools for the task at hand. Those include more borrowing of growth from the future and even greater reliance on activities bolstered by central bank liquidity injections.An increasing number of sectors and countries are experiencing sudden-stop dynamics as the economic effects of the coronavirus spread more widely around the world. Both demand and supply are being hit hard and in multiple ways. For example, News Corp., the owner of the Wall Street Journal, banned nonessential travel for its employees this weekend; more conferences are being cancelled around the world; airlines are reducing flights; and companies are asking employees to work from home. It’s a dynamic that builds on itself in the short term, fueled by a “fear virus” and other behavioral traits that engender paralysis and insecurity. It also promotes self-reinforcing vicious economic cycles with adverse social, political and institutional spillover effects, amplified by the considerable risk of pockets of financial market malfunctioning.The impact of all this will be a repeat internationally of what I called on Friday the “shock number” out of China: The manufacturing purchasing managers’ index for February not only came in well below expectations — 35.7 compared with the consensus estimate of 45.0 — but was also the worst reading on record. Several countries now face a high likelihood of recession, including Germany, Italy, Japan and Singapore, to name just a few, and some of the more financially stressed ones will experience a rise in credit risk and increasing threats of outright credit rationing.With that, a growing number of companies will again be forced to revise downward their earnings guidance for the year or withdraw it altogether because of the exceptional uncertainties. Some, with limited cash cushions and maturing debt like their sovereign counterparts, will also have to worry about their refunding prospects, with mounting risk of higher defaults for the most exposed sectors.In light of all this, it should come as no surprise that a growing number of countries will be announcing emergency stimulus measures. Indeed, those already signaled contain important information:Friday’s rare four-line statement by the Fed pointed to the “evolving risks” facing the U.S. economy and the central bank’s readiness to deploy “tools and act as appropriate to support the economy.” Just like the Fed’s dramatic 180-degree policy turn a year ago from a multiyear path of raising rates to one of immediate cuts during the year, this opens the door for other central banks to loosen financial conditions. If not coordinated, it will be another year of correlated monetary policy stimulus, in which central bankers respond to the same economic conditions but do not cooperate.Italy’s announcement highlights not just the more targeted policy focus — tax credits for companies suffering large hits to revenue and additional help to the health sector — but also the willingness of a government to act even in the context of prior fiscal constraints and potential tensions with Brussels.But the considerable willingness of governments and central banks to act should not be confused with effectiveness.For the reasons I have detailed before, countering an economic sudden stop, such as the one connected with the coronavirus, is a lot harder in the immediate term than resolving a financial sudden stop. It requires not just well-targeted national and local responses but also internationally coordinated, and not just correlated, efforts. (Think, for example, of the April 2009 G-20 meeting in London.) And, given the use of rapidly designed and poorly suited policy tools, it inevitably involves some collateral damage and unintended consequences, especially for longer-term economic well-being and financial stability.The best that fiscal and monetary policy interventions can realistically hope for in the next few weeks and months is to:Support sectors critical to a holistic recovery, medical services in particular. Target the most vulnerable, responsive and highly consequential contracting sectors. Provide focused relief to corporate and household balance sheets. Bolster emergency assistance to countries overwhelmed by this exogenous and external shock. Counter pockets of market malfunctioning through timely direct liquidity injections. Provide increasing clarity as to what lies ahead for the global economy, national responses and global policy coordination. These efforts, however, will not be able to engineer in the short term a generalized global and sustained recovery of the three main drivers of economic activity: consumption, investment and trade.Consumption will be curtailed by households’ lack of confidence to interact in the economy. Weak demand prospects, as well as disrupted supply chains, will limit corporate investment spending. Trade in goods and services will languish as more countries impose restrictions in their quest to protect the health and safety of their citizens.To decisively turn the corner, the global economy needs evidence of two health accomplishments: success in containing the spread of the virus, particularly when it comes to community transmission; and sustained success in illness recovery and avoidance, with the latter best done through the availability of a new vaccine.As for financial markets, look for significant price and liquidity swings as traders navigate the tug-of-war between deepening economic and corporate damage on the one hand and central bank liquidity injections, policy announcements and health news on the other. The immediate opportunity for investors will differ depending on whether they favor highly tactical drivers (that is, day trading and exploiting arbitrage opportunities because of indiscriminate behavior in markets) or secular and structural ones (those looking for longer-term portfolio positioning that can withstand the considerable volatility ahead). To contact the author of this story: Mohamed A. El-Erian at melerian@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Daniel Niemi at dniemi1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Mohamed A. El-Erian is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He is the chief economic adviser at Allianz SE, the parent company of Pimco, where he served as CEO and co-CIO. He is president-elect of Queens' College, Cambridge, senior adviser at Gramercy and professor of practice at Wharton. His books include "The Only Game in Town" and "When Markets Collide."For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Google Settles With States Over Consultants in Antitrust Probe
    Bloomberg

    Google Settles With States Over Consultants in Antitrust Probe

    (Bloomberg) -- Alphabet Inc.’s Google has reached a settlement with state attorneys general over the states’ use of consultants in their antitrust investigation of the internet search giant.Google in October went to court to restrict the Texas Attorney General’s office from disclosing sensitive information to consultants who have worked for competitors and other companies such as News Corp. and Microsoft Corp that have complained about Google to regulators.Both sides reached a settlement that places some restrictions on how the experts can access confidential business information, Google said on Friday.Google had raised concerns over Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton’s hiring of consultants including Cristina Caffarra, an economist with Charles River Associates. She has worked for Google adversaries News Corp. and Microsoft as well as Russia’s Yandex NV, according to court filings.“We remain concerned with the irregular way this investigation is proceeding, including unusual arrangements with advisers who work for our rivals and vocal critics,” Google said in a statement.Paxton later released a statement saying, “With this agreement, experts retained by the state will not be burdened with the unreasonable prohibitions sought by Google. They will be able to lend their important expertise to the state without fear of being frozen out of other employment within their field.”(Updates with Paxton statement, in final paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: David McLaughlin in Washington at dmclaughlin9@bloomberg.net;Ben Brody in Washington, D.C. at btenerellabr@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sara Forden at sforden@bloomberg.net, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Google In Talks with Publishers to Pay for Displaying News
    Bloomberg

    Google In Talks with Publishers to Pay for Displaying News

    (Bloomberg) -- Alphabet Inc.’s Google is in discussions with publishers about paying licensing fees to include excerpts of their articles in Google News search results.The early-stage talks are taking place primarily with French and other European publishers, and may not lead to any agreements, a person familiar with the matter said. A deal would apply only to news products like the Google News vertical, they added, not general web content queries.Google sparked an outcry in France last fall after it said it would show stripped-down French news search results that wouldn’t include article previews or snippets following a new copyright law.It led French publishers and officials, who had hoped to win compensation from platforms as part of the new law, to accuse the search giant of strong-arming them. French antitrust regulators at the time said they would investigate Google over its implementation of the rules.News executives have been calling on Facebook Inc. and Google to pay for the rights to host their articles. They argue that their journalism is what’s drawing users to those platforms, while the two tech giants are capturing most of the online ad dollars.Richard Gingras, Google’s vice president of news, said helping people find quality journalism is “important to informed democracy and helps support a sustainable news industry.”“We’re talking with partners and looking at more ways to expand our ongoing work with publishers,” he added.In Europe, Google’s rocky relationships with publishers have led to legal action, long European Union antitrust investigations and an EU copyright directive that allows news outlets to seek payment from internet sites that display their articles. France was the first country to implement the new rules.In October, Facebook introduced a separate news section in its flagship app and agreed to pay some publishers $1 million to $3 million a year to put their articles in it.In an earnings call last week, News Corp. Chief Executive Officer Robert Thomson mentioned Google by name, saying there are “positive signs” the search company’s CEO Sundar Pichai “has a thoughtful appreciation for the profound social influence of high quality journalism.”The Wall Street Journal reported the discussions earlier.To contact the reporters on this story: Natalia Drozdiak in Brussels at ndrozdiak1@bloomberg.net;Gerry Smith in New York at gsmith233@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Giles Turner at gturner35@bloomberg.net, Nate Lanxon, Molly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    News Corp. launches news aggregation site Knewz to counter Facebook, Google

    News Corp <NWSA.O> on Wednesday launched a free news aggregation service, Knewz, to address its long-held criticism of how Google and Facebook <FB.O> treat publishers and journalists. The service uses artificial intelligence to scan more than 400 national and local news sources across the political spectrum - including Mother Jones, Washington Examiner, and The Nation - and relies on a small team of editors and technical staff to curate articles.

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