NFLX - Netflix, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real-time price. Currency in USD
309.97
+7.17 (+2.37%)
As of 3:02PM EDT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close302.80
Open306.25
Bid309.92 x 900
Ask310.01 x 900
Day's range304.75 - 311.74
52-week range231.23 - 386.80
Volume3,715,202
Avg. volume6,912,282
Market cap135.716B
Beta (3Y monthly)1.36
PE ratio (TTM)122.04
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target estN/A
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • A Foolish Take: Disney's Streaming Bundle Is Netflix's Worst Nightmare
    Motley Fool

    A Foolish Take: Disney's Streaming Bundle Is Netflix's Worst Nightmare

    Disney’s $12.99 bundle promises three substantial services.

  • Motley Fool

    CBS and Viacom: It's Not Enough to Compete With Disney or Netflix

    The two companies have agreed to merge, but they need more intellectual property to be a major player in the streaming market.

  • Here's Why Losing "Friends" and "The Office" Won't Matter to Netflix in the Long Run
    Motley Fool

    Here's Why Losing "Friends" and "The Office" Won't Matter to Netflix in the Long Run

    Much has been made about the loss of two of its most popular shows, but over time, losses such as these will become less important.

  • 3 Reasons Tencent Isn’t Worried About the ByteDance Threat
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    3 Reasons Tencent Isn’t Worried About the ByteDance Threat

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    Why You Should Invest In International Stocks

    Especially if you're an American investor, chances are good that you'd benefit from more international diversification.

  • Netflix: Expensive Content Strategy Concerns Analysts
    Market Realist

    Netflix: Expensive Content Strategy Concerns Analysts

    Netflix will spend $15 billion on content this year alone—up from $12 billion last year. Some analysts started to sound the alarm about Netflix’s spending.

  • Shopify’s Success Puts Spotlight on Next Canadian Tech Stars
    Bloomberg

    Shopify’s Success Puts Spotlight on Next Canadian Tech Stars

    (Bloomberg) -- Shopify Inc.’s scorching rally and Lightspeed POS Inc.’s successful trading debut this year are throwing the spotlight on who might be the next Canadian tech star to go public.A total of C$1 billion ($751 million) was invested in 142 venture capital deals in the first quarter, up 48% from a year earlier, according to the Canadian Venture & Private Equity Association. More than half of that was in tech and increasingly from U.S. investors.Here’s what the founders of some of Canada’s hottest tech firms are saying about the future of their companies, and the potential for initial public offerings:ClearbancClearbanc offers $10,000 to $10 million to startups to help fund their marketing campaigns on Facebook, Google and the like in return for a flat fee and a share of revenue.The Toronto-based investment firm, founded in 2015, raised $300 million in new funding led by Highland Capital Partners of the U.S., the largest disclosed VC-financing this year in Canada. That brings total funding to $420 million.Clearbanc plans to offer $1 billion in financing this year and is interested in funding parts of a business that could turn into a repeatable revenue stream--infrastructure, shipping and sales commissions.It’s expanding outside the U.S. and Canada, where there’s a less developed venture ecosystem and “banks are more conservative,” according to co-founder and chief executive officer, Andrew D’Souza.“We think that the fundamentals of the business, the market opportunity, justifies a large standalone business,” D’Souza said about the possibility of an IPO.WattpadWattpad Corp. may no longer be a startup but its ambitions just keep growing. Founded as a mobile-reading app, 12-year-old Wattpad now calls itself a “multi-platform entertainment company.”The Toronto-based company has provided content for one of the most re-watched movies on Netflix (“The Kissing Booth”), a Hulu series (“Light as a Feather”), and this year a Hollywood feature film (“After”), all through Wattpad Studios, launched in 2016.Last week it inked a deal with Penguin Random House in the U.K. to turn its online content, mainly created and read by young women, into books. That follows the launch of its own publishing imprint, Wattpad Books, in the U.S. in April.The company uses data from more than 80 million monthly active users to identify the best stories across its platform and turn them into content. It has launched a paid, ad-free version as well as exclusive content for a fee.Wattpad has raised $117.8 million from investors including OMERS Ventures, Tencent Holdings Ltd.’s capital arm, and August Capital Corp, and is generating revenue in “eight figures,” according to co-founder and chief executive, Allen Lau.As for an IPO, it’s “not what we spend time focusing on,” Lau said. “Our focus right now is on movies and TV shows, with our partners.”VidyardVidyard Inc. wants to be the YouTube of business videos. Its software allows companies to create personalized videos to engage with customers and use data from their viewing habits to analyze that engagement.Companies are expected to spend $103 billion annually in video-ad marketing by 2023, according to Forrester Research.Vidyard counts 1,200 businesses in over 170 countries as its customers, including enterprise customers such as Honeywell International Inc., LinkedIn and Citibank.“In terms of the next two to three years, we’re just focused on consistent, hockey-stick style growth,” says Devon Galloway, co-founder and chief technology officer at Kitchener, Ontario-based Vidyard.The company has raised $60 million to date from investors including OMERS Ventures, Inovia Capital and the venture capital arm of Salesforce Inc.Galloway said if Vidyard continues to grow as well as it has an IPO would certainly be on its path.WealthsimpleWealthsimple Inc., wishes to replace banks as a customer’s primary financial relationship, according to founder and CEO Michael Katchen.“We want to be a firm that demystifies money,” Katchen said in an interview in Bloomberg’s Toronto office. The investment-services company has more than C$5 billion in assets under management and 175,000 customers in Canada, the U.S. and U.K.The robo-adviser favored by millennials, is also targeting wealthier Canadians and has branched out into commission-free stock trading and savings products. Mortgages, life insurance and checking accounts could be next, Katchen said.Founded in 2014, WealthSimple is not yet profitable, but its backers are patient, Katchen said. These include Power Financial Corp., an investment arm run by the Desmarais family and Allianz SE.Katchen said he’s interested in an IPO but it’s still “a few years away.”(Updates with Clearbanc’s financing plan)To contact the reporter on this story: Simran Jagdev in Toronto at sjagdev1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jacqueline Thorpe at jthorpe23@bloomberg.net;David Scanlan at dscanlan@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Disney (DIS) & Charter Ink Multi-Year Distribution Agreement
    Zacks

    Disney (DIS) & Charter Ink Multi-Year Distribution Agreement

    Disney (DIS) and Charter Communications extend a multi-year distribution agreement to feature TV content of the former on the latter's Spectrum network.

  • Why Is Netflix (NFLX) Down 9.1% Since Last Earnings Report?
    Zacks

    Why Is Netflix (NFLX) Down 9.1% Since Last Earnings Report?

    Netflix (NFLX) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • Pentagon’s $10 Billion Brain Is Frozen by a Contracting Scandal
    Bloomberg

    Pentagon’s $10 Billion Brain Is Frozen by a Contracting Scandal

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- In the latest twist in the fraught competition for the Department of Defense’s $10 billion cloud-computing project, the Pentagon Inspector General’s Office announced a new investigation into whether there have been improprieties or corruption in the contracting process thus far. This probe, described to me as a very significant undertaking by Pentagon insiders, will complement a review already being conducted by new Secretary of Defense Mark Esper.The cloud project is formally known as the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure or, in a nod to “Star Wars” geeks, JEDI. It would provide a single managerial system and a single repository for storage of the department’s incomprehensibly vast data streams. As the controversy hit, the contract was reportedly about to be awarded, with the final competitors being Amazon Web Services Inc (the heavy, heavy favorite) and Microsoft Corp.The twin investigations were spurred by pressure from three sources: disgruntled competitors who felt they were out of the running; Congressional actors representing districts and states from where those competitors have a presence; and the Oval Office itself. President Donald Trump said in mid-July that he intended to review the JEDI contracting after receiving “tremendous complaints” about the process from “some of the great companies in the world,” including IBM, Microsoft and Oracle – each of which bid on the JEDI contract.None of this, other than direct interference by the commander in chief, is particularly out of the ordinary for big defense acquisitions, given the byzantine procurement process in the Pentagon. As a newly selected one-star rear admiral in 2000, I was assigned to manage a complex agency-wide telecommunications contract that included creating a new constellation of satellites. By the time it was finally awarded, I had long transferred out of the Pentagon. And in 2013, as I was a grizzled four-star Admiral about to finish up my career, I was still wondering why the satellite constellation wasn’t yet fully operational. The short answer is that at the nexus of big money, political influence and uncertain technology, delays are a certainty.All of this begs the questions of why the U.S. military is pursuing this system, and how it can be brought on line rapidly – by whomever eventually wins the contract.JEDI will be an absolutely vital part of America’s future warfighting capability, especially in the increasingly complex new 5G environment. At heart, the vast cloud would allow a much more efficient information-technology system, replacing the hodgepodge of thousands of hand-tooled, inefficient networks that exist today. This is especially critical for the military, where so many personnel transfer every two to three years, often taking with them a hands-on knowledge of an individual network or complex of software. For a vast organization like the Department of Defense -- the largest “company” in the world – JEDI’s efficiency at scale will be crucial to optimizing expensive resources and operating efficiently.It’s not just about efficiency, though: JEDI should vastly improve resiliency and security. Instead of individual networks and organizations backing up their information locally, everything is stored in a much more defendable cloud structure - just as your personal data and photographs likely exist in the Microsoft or Apple Inc clouds today. The data can be seamlessly transferred, even in the intense crucible of combat. Cybersecurity experts tell us that there is great strength in reducing the number of individual portals that can be attacked and overcome; streamlining and unifying the defenses of the entire department make sense. This reduction of “threat surfaces” is crucial.Finally, from an operator’s perspective, there is great allure in one-stop shopping to stream data (a sort of military Netflix,), to record and store it, to create simple systems to “patch” software, and to build an infrastructure that permits constant monitoring of the entire department’s networks. Lieutenant General Jack Shanahan, head of the Pentagon’s Artificial Intelligence Center, commented recently on the operational capabilities necessary for the emerging era of great power competition, with China in particular.“Imagine the speed of operations in a fight in the Pacific, where you just do not have time to figure out, ‘How do I get my data, clean my data, move it from point A to point B.’” Shanahan said. “If I’m a warfighter, I want as much data as you could possibly give me. Let my algorithms sort through it at machine speed. It’s really hard for me to do that without an enterprise cloud solution.” His comments were echoed by the department’s chief information officer, Dana Deasy, in a rare on-the-record co-briefing to the press they held last week.In order to move quickly to find efficiencies, create new resiliency, and provide a single point of contact for all IT operations, the Department of Defense needs to thoroughly but quickly complete these investigations. If there are real instances of malfeasance, they should be uncovered and the perpetrators punished forthwith. Frankly, Secretary Esper has an unattractive set of options, including starting the competition over; pressing forward to award despite the external pressure; or searching for some middle ground that may satisfy nobody. Whether he can power through all the sand in the gears here will be the first test of his leadership abilities, and will be among the most important he will face.In the likely scenario that all this smoke reveals not much fire but rather disgruntled competitors and political angst (and a strong component of anti-Amazon influence from the White House, where Amazon founder and Washington Post owner Jeff Bezos is despised), Esper should press through to a contract award as soon as is legally appropriate. Warfighting in the 21st century will be “brain on brain” combat, and a large, singular cloud structure is the gray matter the U.S. military needs.To contact the author of this story: James Stavridis at jstavridis@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Tobin Harshaw at tharshaw@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.James Stavridis is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He is a retired U.S. Navy admiral and former supreme allied commander of NATO, and dean emeritus of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He is also an operating executive consultant at the Carlyle Group and chairs the board of counselors at McLarty Associates.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Your Spotify Plan Might Get More Expensive
    Motley Fool

    Your Spotify Plan Might Get More Expensive

    The audio streaming company is trying to find a way to increase its average revenue per subscriber.

  • 3 Tech Stocks for Dividend Investors to Buy Amid Yield Curve & Trade Fears
    Zacks

    3 Tech Stocks for Dividend Investors to Buy Amid Yield Curve & Trade Fears

    Check out these 3 dividend paying tech stocks to buy as yield curve and trade war fears heat up...

  • Motley Fool

    International Investing: How Much of My Portfolio Should Be Foreign Stocks?

    Investors tend to be biased in favor of their home markets, but that can limit them -- especially if home is not the United States.

  • How Could the Viacom-CBS Merger Affect Netflix?
    Market Realist

    How Could the Viacom-CBS Merger Affect Netflix?

    This week, Viacom (VIAB) and CBS (CBS) agreed to merge to form a new media entity, ViacomCBS. That merger could affect Netflix in several ways. With their merger, Viacom and CBS aim to become a major player in the video streaming market. Viacom CEO Bob Bakish, who is set to lead ViacomCBS, said in an […]

  • 2 Stocks to Consider After Their Recent Sell-Offs
    Motley Fool

    2 Stocks to Consider After Their Recent Sell-Offs

    These high-quality tech stocks may be oversold.

  • Netflix Falls 3%
    Investing.com

    Netflix Falls 3%

    Investing.com - Netflix (NASDAQ:NFLX) fell by 3.17% to trade at $289.63 by 11:09 (15:09 GMT) on Thursday on the NASDAQ exchange.

  • CBS, Viacom to Merge: Media ETFs in Focus
    Zacks

    CBS, Viacom to Merge: Media ETFs in Focus

    After months of negotiations, CBS and Viacom have finally agreed to an all-stock merger, which will lead to the creation of a combined company with more than $28 billion in revenues.

  • Analyst Issues a Rare Mea Culpa on Roku
    Motley Fool

    Analyst Issues a Rare Mea Culpa on Roku

    Wall Street frequently issues upgrades and downgrades without any accountability. Not in this case.

  • Salto Seeks to Loosen Netflix’s Grip on French Market
    Market Realist

    Salto Seeks to Loosen Netflix’s Grip on French Market

    In an effort to challenge Netflix, France Télévisions, TF1, and M6 plan to launch a subscription video service called Salto as early as Q1 2020.

  • Will Disney+ Wipe Out 32% of Netflix’s Subscriber Base?
    Market Realist

    Will Disney+ Wipe Out 32% of Netflix’s Subscriber Base?

    Disney's (DIS) Disney+ streaming service will go live in the US this November, and the ground is already shifting under the current dominant players.

  • Motley Fool

    Roku Lost a (Profits) Battle, but Is Winning the (Living Room) War

    The streaming platform powerhouse's earnings were negative, but still surprisingly good.

  • Amazon Beats Netflix in Over-the-Top Ad Spending
    Market Realist

    Amazon Beats Netflix in Over-the-Top Ad Spending

    Amazon has reportedly overtaken the streaming giant when it comes to over-the-top ad spending, upping the competition for customers and streaming revenue.

  • European Fintechs Escape Troubles Afflicting Established Banks
    Bloomberg

    European Fintechs Escape Troubles Afflicting Established Banks

    (Bloomberg) -- When Swedish banking firm Klarna became Europe’s most valuable financial technology startup last week, it was only the latest sign that digital finance has escaped the troubles afflicting legacy lenders.Its latest fundraising gave Klarna, which facilitates online installment payments, a $5.5 billion valuation. European fintech companies raised $3.3 billion in venture capital in the first half of 2019, up from $1.9 billion in the same period last year, according to data compiled by CB Insights. In contrast, an index of European Union banks has dropped 39% the past 18 months.“Investors are drawn to it because it’s the perfect blend of a huge, mature industry which, empowered by technology, can deliver vast returns, far in excess of what you see if you’re starting up out of nowhere,” said Ben Brabyn, chief executive officer of Level39, one of Europe’s largest fintech accelerators, in an interview.Here are a few other recent industry highlights and what to watch out for next.Fintechs Flout Brexit WorriesLondon fintechs defied the Brexit gloom that descended on the the U.K. Transferwise Ltd. announced a funding round in May that valued the eight-year-old company at $3.5 billion, up from $1.6 billion in 2017. A few weeks later, online bank Monzo closed a new funding round doubling the startup’s valuation to more than $2.5 billion. Meantime, Revolut Ltd., while being eyed by regulators for possible compliance lapses, expanded into stock trading. They weren’t all winners: shares of peer-to-peer lender Funding Circle Ltd. have plunged 65% this year.IZettle’s Surprise PayPal SaleIt was the midnight deal that surprised many -- PayPal Holdings Inc. purchased iZettle AB for $2.2 billion in May 2018 the night before the Swedish startup had planned to price its shares in an initial public offering. Stockholm-based iZettle competes with Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey’s Square Inc., and Canada’s Shopify Inc.Adyen Soars After IPODutch payments processor Adyen NV hit headlines for two reasons last year. First, in February, it was announced the Netherlands-based firm would replace PayPal as EBay Inc.’s global checkout service. Then in June, it held a billion-dollar IPO and saw its shares surge 90% in the first day of trading. The company, whose clients include Netflix Inc. and Spotify Technology SA, is now valued at 20 billion euros ($22.4 billion)Worldpay’s $35.5 Billion DealAs one of the world’s biggest payments firms, Worldpay Inc. handles about $1 trillion annually -- similar to Chase Paymentech. When Fidelity National Information Services Inc. said on July 31 it’d completed its $35.5 billion acquisition of the company, data compiled by Bloomberg showed the combined business will be the world’s biggest in the processing and payments industry. It wasn’t a bad day for Ohio-based Worldpay, which less than two years earlier had been a British enterprise snapped up for 7.7 billion pounds ($9.3 billion) by U.S. merchant acquirer Vantiv.What’s Next?N26, the German mobile bank backed by billionaire Peter Thiel, announced in July it had extended its most recent fundraising round to $470 million, at a valuation of $3.5 billion. The company is expanding from Europe to the U.S., betting it can attract users from established lenders and credit card providers with free accounts, fewer fees and phone alerts.Other companies to watch include Revolut, which despite multiple run-ins with controversy remains exciting to investors after it held one of the biggest fundraising rounds for a European fintech last year, and app-based banks Monzo and Starling, which are attracting customers at a rapid clip.Further down the line is the U.K.’s online lender Zopa Ltd., which its CEO Jaidev Janardana said in July could potentially hold an IPO in 2021.“The valuations are encouraging but they’re not enough. They’re just an early indicator. The important numbers to watch are the customers,” said Brabyn. “We all need to step up to demonstrate the public value of what we do.”To contact the reporter on this story: Ali Ingersoll in London at aingersoll1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Giles Turner at gturner35@bloomberg.net, Nate Lanxon, James HertlingFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Shari Redstone Prepares for Streaming Wars With Viacom-CBS Union
    Bloomberg

    Shari Redstone Prepares for Streaming Wars With Viacom-CBS Union

    (Bloomberg) -- During her trip to the Allen & Co. mogul retreat in Sun Valley, Idaho, this summer, Shari Redstone prowled the grounds with just one executive from the media empire she controls: Jim Lanzone, CBS’s chief digital officer.Lanzone, who oversees dozens of web properties, helped build two businesses that will play a crucial role when CBS Corp. and Viacom Inc. complete their merger. The CBS All Access and Showtime streaming services, with more than 8 million subscribers, have delivered a rare bit of growth in a tough climate for old-line entertainment companies.Stirred to action by the unrelenting loss of pay-TV subscribers, media companies are racing to build online services that can compete with Netflix Inc. On Tuesday, Viacom and CBS announced they’ll merge, creating a $30 billion conglomerate and fulfilling a goal long-held by Redstone, who will chair the combine company. With the deal, she is reuniting parts of the empire assembled by her father Sumner and pinning her hopes on streaming to ensure the companies survive an uncertain moment in media.“Shari Redstone had a problem,” said Laura Martin, an analyst at Needham & Co. “CBS and Viacom are both sub-scale, and they are both hers.”Netflix, the biggest player in streaming, has more than 150 million subscribers, making All Access and Showtime minnows in the online world. The pioneer in streaming, Netflix offers thousands of titles, including a never-ending stream of new scripted series, movies, documentaries, specials, and a vast library of reruns.But together, Martin argues, Viacom and CBS “have a more reasonable chance of competing.”CBS has already built a small, profitable streaming business, relying on a few original scripted shows, a deep library and a live feed of its flagship network. A united ViacomCBS Inc., as the new company is to be called, will control 140,000 TV episodes and 3,600 movies, and will spend about $13 billion on programming annually, close to what Netflix lays out each year.Their combined library has breadth. CBS owns one of the largest archives of hit TV shows in the world, spanning “I Love Lucy,” “Star Trek” and “NCIS.” Viacom’s Paramount Pictures owns one of the largest movie libraries in the world, including “The Godfather” and “Mission: Impossible.” While CBS has a deep collection of sitcoms and scripted dramas, thanks to Showtime, Viacom owns kids shows through Nickelodeon.“Look at what this brings together,” Bob Bakish, who will be the chief executive officer of the combined company, said in an interview. “We have tremendous content scale here across categories, demographics, geographies.”Pluto TVBakish plans to use Pluto TV, an advertising-supported video service he acquired at Viacom, to funnel customers to the paid services. He will also bundle all of the company’s subscription services, including Viacom’s kids offering Noggin.Merging also opens international opportunities, where Netflix has an even larger lead. CBS already sells All Access in Canada and Australia, but could easily extend service to Europe and Latin America with help from Viacom’s Channel 5 in the U.K. and Telefe in Argentina.The merger isn’t without risks. Paramount is one of the weakest studios in Hollywood and has struggled to keep its library fresh with new hits. The studio accounts for just 5% of domestic box-office grosses this year.The new company may also need to take steps to keep the architects of CBS’s recent growth and other valuable executives, such as Lanzone, creative chief David Nevins, CBS Sports Chairman Sean McManus and recently appointed news chief Susan Zirinsky.And even with new heft, ViacomCBS will still be much smaller than most of its competitors. Of the major streaming services already in the marketplace or due out in the net 12 months, All Access and Showtime are the only ones owned by a company worth less than $100 billion.Over the past few years, entertainment companies and pay-TV distributors have responded to the challenges facing conventional media by consolidating into mega-corporations that dwarf CBS and Viacom. Walt Disney Co. bought most of Fox, while AT&T Inc. -- the parent of DirecTV -- purchased Time Warner, creating companies worth than $200 billion apiece. The combined ViacomCBS tips the scale at about $30 billion.Getting CrowdedThose larger companies, along with Apple Inc. and Comcast Corp., are crowding into streaming this year and next to compete with Netflix and Amazon.com Inc. That led analyst Martin to say 2020 will be “The Hunger Games” for the media industry -- a reference to the dystopian film where youngsters fight to the death.That’s why many analysts believe the CBS Viacom tie-up is just a prelude -- the first step in an effort to bulk up or cash out.“We certainly will look at opportunities in the marketplace,” Bakish said. “ViacomCBS is one of the companies that matters, and will get a valuation that fits with that.”To contact the reporter on this story: Lucas Shaw in Los Angeles at lshaw31@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.net, Rob GolumFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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