NFLX - Netflix, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real-time price. Currency in USD
371.12
-1.16 (-0.31%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

371.00 -0.12 (-0.03%)
After hours: 6:53PM EDT

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close372.28
Open374.01
Bid369.25 x 1300
Ask369.50 x 900
Day's range368.31 - 378.39
52-week range252.28 - 393.52
Volume6,713,169
Avg. volume7,928,467
Market cap162.85B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.51
PE ratio (TTM)89.86
EPS (TTM)2.80
Earnings date14 Jul 2019 - 18 Jul 2019
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target est369.74
  • Netflix to launch weekly Instagram Live series about coping during the COVID-19 pandemic
    TechCrunch

    Netflix to launch weekly Instagram Live series about coping during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Netflix is launching a new series on Instagram that will focus on taking care of yourself and your mental health during the COVID-19 global pandemic. The series, which will begin airing on Instagram Live tomorrow at 7 PM PT, features the stars of some of Netflix's top Young Adult shows and movies, including "To All the Boys I've Loved Before," "The Kissing Booth," "Stranger Things," "Cheer" and "13 Reasons Why." The series will run every Thursday from now through May 14 on the @Netflix Instagram account, and will discuss the sort of challenges that young people are facing during the health crisis.

  • Coronavirus: Teens are worried about the economy, have cut spending to the lowest level since 2011
    Yahoo Finance

    Coronavirus: Teens are worried about the economy, have cut spending to the lowest level since 2011

    According to the survey, 47% of U.S. teens think the economy will get worse, up from 28% a year ago.

  • Netflix (NFLX) Toolkit to Help Parents Clean Child Content
    Zacks

    Netflix (NFLX) Toolkit to Help Parents Clean Child Content

    Netflix (NFLX) rolls out an array of tools that enables parents to screen content as well as remove individual series or films by title, which they consider unsuitable for their wards.

  • Netflix, Other Streaming Services Go All Out Amid Quarantine
    Zacks

    Netflix, Other Streaming Services Go All Out Amid Quarantine

    In the past month, Netflix, Inc. (NFLX) and Alphabet Inc.'s (GOOGL) YouTube Kids have seen a surge in subscribers and installs along with longer playback time.

  • How's the Internet Doing? Depends Where You Look
    Bloomberg

    How's the Internet Doing? Depends Where You Look

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- As Americans stay home to thwart the invisible threat of a virus lurking beyond their windows, they’ve become even more dependent upon something else they cannot see or feel: the internet. U.S. data networks — an intricate system of cables and towers and signals weaving throughout our country — are being put to the ultimate test in a nationwide work-from-home experiment that hinges entirely on these networks’ health and adaptability.As residents shelter in place to stop the spread of the coronavirus, the surge in demand that internet providers would expect to see gradually over the course of an entire year has instead hit in a matter of weeks. That’s because of all the work-from-home applications, calls and texts to check in with loved ones, Netflix binge-watching and virtual exercise classes and doctor’s visits. AT&T Inc. reported that traffic on its core network was up 23% on Sunday, April 5, from a comparable day in February. Comcast Corp. said its peak traffic jumped more than 30% in March, and in some larger metropolitan areas, such as Chicago and San Francisco, it climbed as much as 60%. While streaming-video consumption is on the rise, data usage for gaming has more than doubled, according to Verizon Communications Inc.It raises the question, how are these crucial networks faring, and will they be able to keep handling this kind of a load? The answer is complicated and even more so the longer the pandemic persists. But so far — as anyone fortunate enough to be able to work remotely and stream Netflix can attest — things seem to be going OK.“These networks are holding up pretty well to the onslaught of traffic demand that they've been subject to,” Steve Alexander, chief technology officer at Ciena Corp., said during a virtual Zoom interview on Monday — our very own test of the internet’s capabilities during the new peak hours. (Ciena provides the underlying software and equipment used by network operators.)Still, there’s no one official source for tracking the state of America’s digital connectivity. Ajit Pai, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, released a statement last week summarizing the upbeat feedback he’s received from internet providers. “It appears,” he said, that networks are performing fine, relying on the data disclosed by those companies. There are handy third-party sources such as Ookla and BroadbandNow; however, the different methodologies make it difficult to get a good read. For example, Ookla has shown a barely perceptible decline in average fixed broadband download speeds in the U.S. But BroadbandNow has found that 88 of the top 200 cities have had “some degree of network degradation,” with 27 cities experiencing more significant declines.Part of the problem is that nationwide averages aren’t practical when internet infrastructure and reliability can vary immensely from one state or county to the next. Millions of Americans in rural towns still don’t have access to minimum download speeds of 25 megabits per second, as I noted last month. And even that probably isn’t sufficient for households using multiple devices simultaneously for data-intensive tasks such as watching Hulu and joining a work-video conference. Netflix and its ilk reduced picture quality in Europe to ease network congestion, but the U.S. hasn’t needed to resort to such actions.Another issue is that connections tend to be measured in terms of download speeds, while upload speeds are much slower and are needed for things like video calls. That’s why it’s important to look at latency, the amount of time it takes a signal to travel, which can explain annoying buffering on streaming apps and lags in a FaceTime connection.The unprecedented demand “is putting real stress on our networks, and with so much of modern life now dependent on these connections it is fair to ask how providers are managing this new demand,” FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel said in a statement responding to questions sent to her office. “Getting a few reports using different methods from a handful of companies is useful, but it’s not enough.” Rosenworcel has called for the FCC to issue daily updates on network status, just as it would during a hurricane or mass power outage, events that activate its Disaster Information Reporting System.The FCC has at least gotten internet providers such as AT&T, Comcast and Verizon to sign onto its Keep Americans Connected Pledge, agreeing for 60 days not to terminate customers’ service if they’re unable to pay their bills. An emerging challenge could be the safety of employees who are essential to keeping these networks up and running. Like hospital and supermarket staff, their work hasn’t stopped. As Ciena’s Alexander put it: “The network is there, kind of like air — it just works, until all of a sudden there’s an issue and you notice it.” For now, all we can really go by is the industry’s word. But you’ll know when there’s a problem. This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tara Lachapelle is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the business of entertainment and telecommunications, as well as broader deals. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Netflix rolls out more features for parental control globally
    Reuters

    Netflix rolls out more features for parental control globally

    Netflix also said parents can remove individual series or films on their kids profiles, and review those under "profile and parental controls" within account settings. Netflix led rivals on most number of app downloads in the first quarter of 2020 but more time was spent on YouTube's Kids service, indicating parents are letting the kids soak it in for longer periods, according to a report by Apptopia and Braze last week.

  • Buy Netflix (NFLX) Stock Ahead of Q1 Earnings for Coronavirus Streaming?
    Zacks

    Buy Netflix (NFLX) Stock Ahead of Q1 Earnings for Coronavirus Streaming?

    Should investors buy Netflix stock with the streaming TV firm set to report its Q1 fiscal 2020 financial results on April 21?

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Roku launches ad-funded streaming channel in 'stay-at-home' Britain

    Streaming-device maker Roku Inc launched its Roku Channel in Britain on Tuesday, offering free access to more than 10,000 movies, TV episodes and documentaries at a time when the coronavirus is driving demand for stay-at-home entertainment. The Roku Channel, which is available using a Roku streaming player, Roku TV or pay-TV company Sky's NOW TV device or Sky Q box, will show British series including "Homes Under the Hammer", "Ultimate Force" and "Skins" and Hollywood hits like "Get Carter", the company said. Rob Holmes, vice president of programming, said there was an opportunity to supplement subscription video-on-demand services like Netflix and Disney+ with a free offer.

  • INTERVIEW: Beachbody CEO Carl Daikeler Sees Surge in Home Fitness Demand During Lockdown and Beyond
    IPO-Edge.com

    INTERVIEW: Beachbody CEO Carl Daikeler Sees Surge in Home Fitness Demand During Lockdown and Beyond

    By John Jannarone The recent quarantine triggered by the coronavirus pandemic has caused a surge in demand for home fitness video-streaming services. Beachbody, which has a track record of over 20 years in the business, has been a leader in the field as media formats evolved from VHS to DVD and now streaming. In an […]

  • Investing For The Post-Pandemic World
    Zacks

    Investing For The Post-Pandemic World

    Investing For The Post-Pandemic World

  • It’s a Quibi! Quirky Streaming Service for Smartphones Is Born Into Quarantining Nation
    Bloomberg

    It’s a Quibi! Quirky Streaming Service for Smartphones Is Born Into Quarantining Nation

    (Bloomberg) -- After a long stint embedded in his home office, Jeffrey Katzenberg felt almost ready to take a break. He was looking forward, he said on a Zoom call in late March, to watching more of “Tiger King,” the wacko documentary series from Netflix about big-cat trainers behaving badly, which was currently captivating large numbers of homebound viewers. A few years ago, Katzenberg said, he’d come across Joe Exotic, the incarcerated zookeeper at the center of the Florida-noir series, and had considered making a show about him. But it never came to pass, and now he was in the same boat as everybody else, stuck at home, watching the hit program on Netflix. The special powers of exotic animals seemed to be lingering on his mind. The press could hound him all they wanted but he didn’t scare easily, he explained. He leaned forward, took a pinch of his arm, and held it up to his computer’s camera. “This is rhino skin,” said Katzenberg. In the days ahead, he will certainly need all the big rhino energy he can muster.  On Monday, Katzenberg and his business partner Meg Whitman, the former chief executive officer of EBay, are overseeing the much-anticipated launch of Quibi, a short-form mobile video service that arrives into a crowded field of fierce competitors who are digging in for a long, bloody battle. Quibi, which will eventually cost $5 a month with ads, or $8 without them, will roll out 175 shows this year. The kaleidoscopic slate of programming is a mix of comedic series, dramas, reality shows, and topical news programs — all of  it serialized into brief episodes. The idea is to reach out and grab users’ attention for a few minutes at a time whenever they’re idly staring down at their phones. In one cooking competition, food is blasted out of a cannon onto participants’ faces. In another show, a sex therapist talks about how to date during a pandemic.While Quibi can sometimes sounds like a film school fever dream, it’s one of the more ambitious projects to emerge in recent years from the crossroads of Hollywood and Silicon Valley. To date, the company has collected about $2 billion worth of investment, much of it coming from major media companies. It has written checks to some of the biggest celebrities in the world. Steven Spielberg and Bill Murray are contributors. “The first thing you have to understand is, if you are a storyteller and you work in Hollywood — movies, television, animation, I don’t care, any part of it — you are an entrepreneur,” said Katzenberg. “And that entrepreneurial spirit hasn’t been tapped in a while.”Despite Katzenberg’s impressive track record in the entertainment business, plenty of competitors, critics and industry analysts are betting on Quibi to lose. “Our reaction out of the gate was: ‘I think this is gonna be pretty tough,’” said Stephen Beck, founder and managing partner of management consulting firm CG42. “Free short-form video on your mobile phone already exists, and you can get a lot of it by relatively big-name stars.”  See, for example, YouTube. Katzenberg said he has found some of the more pointed criticism of the yet-to-launch service downright amusing. In February, the New York Times published a lengthy essay by writer Dan Brooks entitled “What’s a Quibi? A Way to Amuse Yourself Until You’re Dead,” which argued that the service cynically aimed to exploit consumers’ already unhealthy addictions to smartphones. Katzenberg said that after reading the piece, he reached out to its author and set the guy up with a phone loaded with Quibi content. That’s Rhino Skin, buddy. (Brooks said in an email the shows he saw were “uneven.”) “I asked my kids: ‘Are your friends watching stuff on their phones?’ They said: ‘Absolutely.’ So we wrote the script.”On Feb. 2, Quibi ran a Super Bowl ad in which a bunch of bank robbers wait for their getaway driver, who is distracted mid-heist by a Quibi show on his phone. Tagline: “Episodes in 10 Minutes or Less.” In the weeks that followed, Katzenberg and his colleagues were planning to advertise heavily during other major sports events, including March Madness. The campaign was supposed to culminate with a star-studded premiere party at 3Labs in Culver City, California. All of it was conceived to generate a ton of free press. Getting Quibi’s quirky-sounding name out as much as possible was important. Outside of the entertainment and media industries, few people knew what Quibi was. In a poll commissioned by the Hollywood Reporter and Morning Consult in March, 81% of adults said they’d heard little or nothing at all about Quibi. But before Quibi could promote itself to America’s legions of live-sports viewers, the pandemic hit and the entire sports industry ground to a halt. Quibi would have to turn elsewhere for introductions en masse. In mid-March, with businesses and schools shutting down around the country, Katzenberg, Whitman and the board discussed the possibility of delaying Quibi’s April 6 launch date. "We said, ‘OK, we can launch, but should we launch?’” Whitman told Bloomberg Television. “We’re not health-care professionals, we’re not first responders. But we thought what we do is inform, entertain and inspire. So we thought we could bring a little joy and light and levity to people’s challenges right now. So we decided to go."Rather than postponing, they tweaked the rollout. They decided to give away the service for free for the first 90 days, a way of appealing to cash-strapped viewers suddenly grappling with a dire economic situation. Quibi also shifted the focus of its advertising blitz away from live TV events and onto social media.Katzenberg and his colleagues have since rolled out a campaign in which the company is paying its series’ stars like Chrissy Teigen to hype Quibi on Twitter, Instagram and TikTok. Meanwhile, many contributors in Hollywood are watching the launch with curiosity.  Peter and Bobby Farrelly, the fraternal screenwriters known for comedies like “Dumb and Dumber” and “There’s Something About Mary,” have a Quibi show in the works, entitled “The Now,” starring Dave Franco and Bill Murray, which will premier in May. In separate phone interviews, the Farrelly Brothers said it was a little weird to make a film that needed a cliffhanger every 10 minutes, but ultimately that it was “a fun experiment.”“I rarely watch things on my phone, certainly not television,” said Peter Farrelly. “So I asked my kids: ‘Are your friends watching stuff on their phones?’ They said: ‘Absolutely.’ So we wrote the script.”While the new service may feel experimental, Katzenberg is quick to point out that Quibi has plenty of historical precedents. He cites Charles Dickens as a producer of Quibi-like narratives, as well as Dan Brown, the author of “The DaVinci Code.” Both writers, Katzenberg said, were masters of feeding audiences long stories in installments. For readers lacking time or self-discipline, that meant they could consume a sprawling, complex tale in brief increments over weeks or months without losing the plot. Quibi’s kickoff comes not long after the debut of Disney+, the robust streaming service that arrived in the U.S. in November and quickly attracted more than 28 million subscribers. Disney can be a tough act to follow. Katzenberg should know. During the ’80s and early ’90s, he oversaw a major revival of Disney’s animation division. While he may have missed out on “Tiger King,” back in 1994, he found an epic feline hit in “The Lion King,” which went on to gross hundreds of millions of dollars at the box office for Disney and has since spawned an impressive litter of spinoff movies and shows. These days, “The Lion King” franchise is still hard at work, attracting streaming subscribers to Disney+. “They got 100 years, the greatest brands ever known, the most amazing library ever, and ‘The Mandalorian,’” said Katzenberg, referring to a popular Star Wars show.Quibi, by contrast, has got some interesting mobile viewing technology, a large batch of unproven programming and some great expectations.  Katzenberg said that of the 50 shows that Quibi will offer people in the first two weeks, he expects eight to 10 to go viral. “Meaning, in the same way we’re laughing about ‘Tiger King,’” he said. “You’re hearing about it through a connection. We’re not allowed to be around one another, but we are all still connected.” For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • What Happens When Hollywood Shuts Down
    Bloomberg

    What Happens When Hollywood Shuts Down

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Todd Garner was in Puerto Rico filming his latest comedy “Vacation Friends” — for 20th Century Studios and starring John Cena — when it started to become evident that the coronavirus was going to be a serious problem. While the U.S. government wasn’t quite yet relaying such severity, “I could see the anxiety on everybody’s faces” among the cast and crew, Garner recounted on a recent episode of his podcast. Questions arose that filmmakers haven’t had to confront before: Should so many people be working in such close quarters? Is it safe for makeup artists to be touching the actors’ faces? Two weeks into production, and with six weeks to go, they put the film on ice.It’s hardly the only movie that’s had to temporarily stop filming and send everyone home for an unknowable period of time. Indeed, “show business” is neither right now. Garner, who co-produced “Paul Blart: Mall Cop,” said he also had two TV series for Netflix Inc. that were already far along and had to cease production. Netflix’s “Stranger Things,” HBO’s “Succession,” ABC’s “Grey’s Anatomy,” AMC Networks Inc.’s “The Walking Dead,” Hulu’s “Handmaid’s Tale” and Apple Inc.’s “The Morning Show” are among other series with highly anticipated returning seasons that will be delayed by national stay-at-home orders. And it’s not just scripted shows. For example, it seems unlikely that the “Friends” reunion special can still be filmed in time for the arrival of HBO Max, a new streaming-TV service launching in May from AT&T Inc.’s WarnerMedia, which reportedly paid $425 million last year to snatch away from Netflix the streaming rights to the popular 1990s-early aughts sitcom.Movie theaters are closed and there aren’t any sports to watch. For an audience bored by the isolation on a good day, and entirely dispirited by it on the bad ones, it’s all the more devastating to not be able to look forward to our favorite shows.The Hollywood shutdown hit just as media giants like Comcast Corp. and Walt Disney Co. are getting their streaming products off the ground, each looking to spend billions of dollars on new content. Disney+ and Apple TV+ both launched in November, while Comcast’s NBCUniversal is introducing its Peacock service April 15. Quibi, a startup created by a pair of media and tech veterans that’s reportedly raised $1.75 billion in funding, launched Monday. With everyone home and glued to their TVs and devices, these companies will have a chance to attract more subscribers, while viewers gain more options for passing the time.Even so, none of these apps on its own may have enough to watch or offer sufficient variety for the average household. The most sought-after programs have been divvied up among the different services, which each charge their own monthly fees. Viewers might just grow tired with of any of these streaming apps when forced to spend so much extra time with one, potentially creating more volatile churn rates — the closely tracked measurement of customers canceling subscriptions. It’s a test for the streaming newbies and even Netflix that’s made all the more challenging if new content stops flowing in.New theatrical releases have gotten caught in the middle of this, too. For a big-budget film like “F9,” the latest installment of “The Fast and the Furious” franchise, bypassing hundreds of millions of dollars in box-office revenue isn’t really an option. That’s why Universal Pictures pushed back the release by almost a whole year to next April. But with “Trolls World Tour,” Universal decided to make the movie available to rent on-demand for $20 instead of just delaying its theatrical debut. Other studios are having to make similar decisions. It raises the question of how all these delayed movies will fit into exhibitors’ schedules once theaters do reopen. As movie-goers grow accustomed to being able to see first-run films at home, and as streaming services try to juice their subscriber bases, a potential outcome may be shorter theatrical windows and an industry that’s forever changed.The pain is also being felt by contractors and local businesses in Atlanta, which became the new U.S. hub for TV and film production in recent years. About 400 works were filmed, resulting in $2.9 billion invested in Georgia for the fiscal year ended June 2019, according to the state. “Film & Entertainment” is featured prominently on the Georgia Department of Economic Development website, but visit the “now filming” section and you’ll find a bare page that reads: “Production in Georgia has been largely suspended due to the Covid-19 outbreak.”Hollywood isn’t the only industry where workers’ safety has been suddenly put at odds with their livelihoods. Still, as housebound viewers devour more content than ever, new shows and movies aren’t getting made. That makes TV entertainment one area where the effects of the pandemic could be most striking for the everyday consumer.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tara Lachapelle is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the business of entertainment and telecommunications, as well as broader deals. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Coronavirus stock picking: What would mom and pop do?

    You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@thomsonreuters.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@thomsonreuters.com) and Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@thomsonreuters.com) in London. When it comes to stock picking, UK retail investors seem to trust in what they see around them and that's TV binge watching and Amazon deliveries. "Many retail investors are investing in the companies we are all turning to help us weather the COVID-19 storm, such as streaming services like Netflix, delivery services like Amazon and supermarkets like Tesco", said Iqbal Gandham, UK Managing Director at eToro.

  • Netflix (NFLX) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Netflix (NFLX) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, Netflix (NFLX) closed at $357.32, marking a -0.82% move from the previous day.

  • ‘Apocalyptic’ scenario unlikely for Amazon and other tech stocks, tech analyst says
    Yahoo Finance

    ‘Apocalyptic’ scenario unlikely for Amazon and other tech stocks, tech analyst says

    Tech giants Facebook, Amazon, Apple Netflix, and Google — also known as the FAANG stocks — will endure the crisis and some may benefit from it, says Daniel Ives, managing director of equity research at Wedbush.

  • Netflix, Facebook to cut data traffic in India to ease network congestion
    Reuters

    Netflix, Facebook to cut data traffic in India to ease network congestion

    BENGALURU/NEW DELHI (Reuters) - Streaming service Netflix Inc and social media giant Facebook Inc said on Tuesday they would reduce the amount of data their services use to ease congested telecoms networks in India, where millions are using home internet amid a lockdown to contain the coronavirus outbreak. Netflix will reduce traffic over Indian telecom networks by 25% over the next 30 days, the company said in a statement, following similar moves in Europe to help internet service providers experiencing a surge in usage. The producer of original shows such as "The Crown" and "Sex Education", Netflix has over 16 million paying users in the Asia-Pacific region, but it does not disclose subscriber figures for India.

  • Top Stock Reports for Visa, Bank of America & Citigroup
    Zacks

    Top Stock Reports for Visa, Bank of America & Citigroup

    Top Stock Reports for Visa, Bank of America & Citigroup

  • Netflix (NFLX) Cuts Stream Quality in Israel on Coronavirus Woes
    Zacks

    Netflix (NFLX) Cuts Stream Quality in Israel on Coronavirus Woes

    Netflix (NFLX) is set to reduce the bitrate of its streams for 30 days in Israel in an attempt to lower network traffic by 25%.

  • Netflix Market Cap Surpasses Disney Amid ‘Stay at Home’ Orders
    Bloomberg

    Netflix Market Cap Surpasses Disney Amid ‘Stay at Home’ Orders

    (Bloomberg) -- Walt Disney Co. shares have tumbled amid the coronavirus pandemic, and the sell-off has resulted in a smaller valuation than video-streaming company Netflix Inc., a reflection of what segments of the media ecosystem are favored in an uncertain environment.Thus far this year, Disney shares have dropped more than 40%, compared with a gain of 9.2% in Netflix. Based on their most recent close, these moves have given Netflix a market capitalization of about $158 billion, compared with Disney’s $154.8 billion valuation.This is not the first time the video-streaming giant has eclipsed the Mouse House in size. The last time was in March 2019, when the achievement was short lived. Prior to that, Netflix sustained a larger valuation for a few weeks in mid-2018.Netflix is “a key beneficiary” of the change in behavior the pandemic has prompted, as Baird wrote in a recent upgrade, with the outbreak causing more people to stay at home and stream more video. According to Credit Suisse, Netflix has seen a spike in downloads for its app in regions that have been hit hard by the coronavirus, a trend that could point to higher international demand. In the U.S., the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has encouraged most people to stay at home, while states including New York and California have issued social-distancing mandates.While Disney recently launched a streaming service of its own, the company’s more diverse business model has opened it up to multiple risks. Bloomberg Intelligence analyst Geetha Ranganathan wrote that the outbreak was “hammering multiple segments” of the company, “with theme parks closed, film releases delayed, sporting events canceled on its TV networks -- most notably ESPN -- and film and TV production halted.”The company’s outlook over the near and medium-term, analyst Geetha Ranganathan wrote, is “under severe pressure.”According to data compiled by Bloomberg, expectations for Disney’s full-year adjusted earnings have dropped by 12.5% over the past month, while revenue expectations are down 1.2%.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    YouTube to Limit Video Quality Around the World for a Month

    (Bloomberg) -- YouTube will reduce the quality of videos around the world starting Tuesday, an effort by the world’s most popular video site to ease internet traffic during the coronavirus outbreak.Over the coming days, viewers will at first see YouTube videos in standard definition, the company said. Users will still be able to watch in high definition if they want, but will have to choose to do so.YouTube, part of Alphabet Inc.’s Google, is extending a policy it already instituted in Europe, where regulators have asked major streaming services, including Netflix Inc. and Amazon Prime Video, to reduce their bandwidth usage.Use of streaming services has surged in recent weeks as hundreds of millions of people stay home to contain the spread of the virus. While YouTube viewing has historically spiked in the evening when people are off work, consumption is now more steady across the day, the company said.Hollywood Torrent: Will we run out of new TV during Coronavirus?Streaming video requires more internet bandwidth than music, messaging or maps because of the size of the files transmitted. Google was the largest consumer of traffic volume on the internet last year, just ahead of Netflix, according to a study by Sandvine, a network analysis firm. Recently, YouTube traffic has surged even more, Sandvine reported last week.YouTube already limits the quality of video based on the strength of a user’s internet connection. YouTube doesn’t believe the world will run out of internet bandwidth any time soon, but is taking a preemptive measure given growing concerns at the government level.“We continue to work closely with governments and network operators around the globe to do our part to minimize stress on the system during this unprecedented situation,” Google said in a statement.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Netflix is reducing its traffic on ISPs by 25% in India
    TechCrunch

    Netflix is reducing its traffic on ISPs by 25% in India

    Netflix said on Tuesday that it is lowering its traffic on network providers by 25% in India for a period of 30 days, following a similar move in Europe in a bid to reduce the congestion on internet pipelines as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The American giant said that despite lowering the strain it puts on internet service providers, it will "maintain the quality" of its service. Updated at 1:10PM IST on March 25: Facebook, Google, TikTok, Viacom18, and Sony have said they are, by default, serving their video streams in standard definition (480p) on cellular networks in India.

  • Facebook Cuts Video Streaming Quality in Coronavirus-Hit Europe
    Zacks

    Facebook Cuts Video Streaming Quality in Coronavirus-Hit Europe

    Facebook (FB) downgrades video streaming quality in Europe following Netflix, YouTube among others in Europe in an attempt to lower network traffic amid Covid-19 outbreak.

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