NFLX - Netflix, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real-time price. Currency in USD
360.30
-10.74 (-2.89%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

362.80 +2.50 (0.69%)
Pre-market: 6:19AM EDT

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close371.04
Open370.75
Bid363.00 x 1200
Ask363.60 x 800
Day's range358.29 - 371.00
52-week range231.23 - 419.77
Volume5,750,383
Avg. volume6,462,735
Market cap157.53B
Beta (3Y monthly)1.51
PE ratio (TTM)128.68
EPS (TTM)2.80
Earnings date17 Jul 2019
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target est388.66
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • The Office is leaving Netflix in 2021 because NBC wants it back
    TechCrunch4 hours ago

    The Office is leaving Netflix in 2021 because NBC wants it back

    Well, it's official: The Office is leaving Netflix .Michael Scott and the rest of Dunder Mifflin will be heading for another streaming service come January 2021.By far the most popular show on Netflix in 2018, The Office was bound to leave the service eventually — or, at the very least, see some HUGE contract renegotiations.

  • NBC is removing 'The Office' from Netflix in 2021 and putting it on its new streaming service
    CNBC12 hours ago

    NBC is removing 'The Office' from Netflix in 2021 and putting it on its new streaming service

    NBC is taking the office back from Netflix as it seeks to bolster its own streaming service launching in 2020.

  • What Netflix Does -- and Doesn't -- Do With Your Data
    Motley Fool13 hours ago

    What Netflix Does -- and Doesn't -- Do With Your Data

    Netflix's viewer data is all about improving the value of the service.

  • Disney poaches Netflix film executive for streaming service
    Reuters14 hours ago

    Disney poaches Netflix film executive for streaming service

    In his new role at Disney, Brodlie will determine what content needs to be produced or acquired for Disney+ customers outside of the United States, according to a statement from the company. In recent years, Netflix had been luring away high-profile executives from rivals and was earlier sued by Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp for poaching employees as it built an audience of nearly 149 million global customers.

  • Roku Extends Slide as Analysts See Retreat From Red-Hot Run
    Bloomberg16 hours ago

    Roku Extends Slide as Analysts See Retreat From Red-Hot Run

    (Bloomberg) -- Roku Inc. shares fell on Tuesday, with the stock retreating further from record levels in what analysts said was a reaction to the company’s massive year-to-date advance.The stock dropped as much as 6.6% in what was on track to be its fourth straight decline, its longest losing streak since a six-day decline in April. Roku, a platform for video-streaming services, has lost about 12% over the four-day slump.Even with the recent losses, the stock is up nearly 250% from a December low, and it hit record levels last week.“There are plenty of examples of high-growth companies that are well positioned in popular sectors, where investors get ahead of themselves,” said Tom Forte, an analyst at D.A. Davidson who has a buy rating on the stock.“Roku is in a very favorable position, where it can exploit the large investments being made by participants in the video category -- not just Netflix, but also Amazon, Apple and Disney,” he told Bloomberg in a phone interview. “As video ad revenue gravitates to where the eyeballs are, to [over-the-top] services and away from legacy, linear television, I think it has the ability to grow into its valuation.”Roku’s stock has long been in a tug-of-war between its high levels of growth and a valuation that analysts often see as excessive. The stock can be extremely volatile, moving more than 20% following each of its past four quarterly results.Roku’s second-quarter results are estimated to come out on August 7, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Currently, analysts expect it to report revenue growth of more than 40%, a pace that’s expected to continue in the subsequent quarter, and then stay above 30% for the next two quarters.This growth is seen as fueled by the company’s continued popularity with consumers at a time when streaming video has become a dominant part of the entertainment landscape. According to a Citi analysis of over-the-top services, the Roku Channel was the seventh most popular channel in May, up from ninth place in April.“The market clearly believes Roku has nearly unlimited growth potential,” wrote Wedbush analyst Michael Pachter in a report dated June 24.He added that while the company had built “an exceptional platform” and “has positioned itself as best in class for OTT advertising,” these factors were “fully priced in” the share price.Wedbush has a neutral rating on Roku, but on Monday boosted its price target to $105 from $65.To contact the reporter on this story: Ryan Vlastelica in New York at rvlastelica1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Catherine Larkin at clarkin4@bloomberg.net, Steven FrommFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • One FANG stock could be the best catch-up trade to chase the market rally
    CNBC19 hours ago

    One FANG stock could be the best catch-up trade to chase the market rally

    For the investor trying to play catch-up to the stock market rally, Netflix stands out, says Oppenheimer technical analyst Ari Wald.

  • Investing.com20 hours ago

    Netflix Falls 3%

    Investing.com - Netflix (NASDAQ:NFLX) fell by 3.04% to trade at $359.81 by 14:37 (18:37 GMT) on Tuesday on the NASDAQ exchange.

  • Amazon Could Be the Winner in the Disney-Netflix Battle
    Motley Fool21 hours ago

    Amazon Could Be the Winner in the Disney-Netflix Battle

    The home video release of "Captain Marvel" illustrates why a third player may be the ultimate victor in the battle between the streaming market leader and Disney+ later this year.

  • How Apple TV+ Is Looking to Take On Established Players
    Market Realist21 hours ago

    How Apple TV+ Is Looking to Take On Established Players

    Grand View Research expects the global streaming market to reach $124.6 billion in 2025, up from $36.6 billion in 2018. Apple (AAPL) now has its eye on the competition in this segment.

  • Hulu’s Subscriber Base Rises to 28 Million—How Netflix Compares
    Market Realist23 hours ago

    Hulu’s Subscriber Base Rises to 28 Million—How Netflix Compares

    In the first quarter of 2019, streaming platform Hulu added 3.8 million subscribers in the US, more than twice as many as Netflix's (NFLX) 1.74 million. Hulu’s subscriber base has now increased to 28 million, up from ~25 million in January 2019.

  • Disney's Recent Run Is a Lesson for Long-Term Investors
    Motley Fool23 hours ago

    Disney's Recent Run Is a Lesson for Long-Term Investors

    Even in the wake of a multiyear slump, there were signs that the multimedia giant would rebound.

  • "Pretty Little Liars" Netflix Departure Is a Sign of Things to Come
    Motley Fool2 days ago

    "Pretty Little Liars" Netflix Departure Is a Sign of Things to Come

    Netflix might have a problem we all saw coming.

  • Netflix (NFLX) Gains As Market Dips: What You Should Know
    Zacks2 days ago

    Netflix (NFLX) Gains As Market Dips: What You Should Know

    Netflix (NFLX) closed the most recent trading day at $371.06, moving +0.5% from the previous trading session.

  • How Does Amazon Prime Compare to Netflix?
    Market Realist2 days ago

    How Does Amazon Prime Compare to Netflix?

    Netflix (NFLX) was one of the first players in the online streaming space. Netflix launched its streaming platform back in 2007 and now has over 150 million subscribers worldwide.

  • 3 Tech Stocks for Growth Investors to Buy
    Zacks2 days ago

    3 Tech Stocks for Growth Investors to Buy

    Now it's time to check out three tech stocks that came through our screen today that growth investors might want to consider at the moment...

  • Rocked by Stock Rout, ‘Hunger Games’ Studio Is Ready to Talk
    Bloomberg2 days ago

    Rocked by Stock Rout, ‘Hunger Games’ Studio Is Ready to Talk

    (Bloomberg) -- The studio that brought you “The Hunger Games,’’ “Mad Men’’ and “John Wick’’ is now facing its own existential question.Lions Gate Entertainment Corp. has lost more than half its market value over the last year as the once-idolized filmmaker struggles to find new megahits. On top of that, recent mergers have created entertainment behemoths that threaten to make smaller studios an afterthought in Hollywood’s new blockbuster environment.All that has created a new sense of urgency around the 22-year-old Lions Gate as it weighs its future: open itself to being acquired, sell off pieces, or try to bulk up to compete with the giants.“Some studios have scale and unfortunately some studios are now subscale,” said John Tinker, an analyst at Gabelli & Co. “The question is obviously, if you are a smaller studio and you do not own Marvel, what are you going to do?”Investors are worried and frustrated that management may have missed the M&A boat, said Geetha Ranganathan, a Bloomberg Intelligence analyst. “Time and options seem to be running out.”Lions Gate shares fell as much as 5.3% Monday to a seven-year low of $11.38 in New York. The company declined to comment.The studio was formed in 1997 in Vancouver by movie-loving mining financier Frank Giustra. It made its name distributing R-rated movies like “American Psycho” and, with the acquisition of Summit Entertainment in 2012, was propelled into the big leagues by the teen-vampire “Twilight” film saga. That same year it also launched the “The Hunger Games’’ franchise. (The studio announced last week there might be a prequel.)But as a smaller company, Lions Gate has long been a target of merger speculation. Companies from Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer to Sony to CBS Corp. have been linked to potential deals. Two years ago, Lions Gate walked away from talks with game-maker Hasbro Inc. involving a $41 a share offer, worth almost $9 billion, people familiar with the situation said.Today, the stock trades below $12, weighed down by two years of declining revenue in its motion picture division, and merger talks have picked up again. Lions Gate has held informal discussions in the past year with companies that may be interested in buying the whole business, people with knowledge of the situation said. But with the stock at seven-year lows, the studio isn’t interested in selling itself at the moment, people close to the situation said.A handful of other strategies are under discussion. One is to buy a stake in Miramax, the film producer formerly owned by the Weinstein brothers, one of the people said. Its current owner, BeIn Media Group, has recently sought buyers for a minority stake. Such a move would give Lions Gate access to a library of Oscar-winning movies such as “Shakespeare in Love” and, more recently, revived franchises like “Halloween.” A Miramax spokesman declined to comment.Starz SaleThe company is also considering selling the studio’s pay-cable network Starz, which contributes more than half its profits. Lions Gate last month turned down a $5 billion informal bid from CBS for Starz, but a sale remains a possibility, according to people familiar with the situation. If that happens, industry sources say, a slimmed-down Lions Gate might become more attractive to potential bidders. Others suggest the studio would be a tough sell without Starz.Meanwhile, the studio is looking to raise perhaps several hundred million dollars from investors to expand Starz internationally. That effort will be slowed down by upcoming negotiations with AT&T’s DirecTV over fees to carry the channel.At recent stock prices, Lions Gate is valued at less than the sum of its parts, according to Tim Nollen, a Macquarie Capital analyst. Shares could be worth $21 in a breakup, with a $5 billion valuation for Starz, $1.5 billion for the motion picture unit and $1 billion for the TV segment.Malone StakeFor investors such as cable magnate John Malone, who first bought shares in 2015 at around $30, it’s a rare miss. He controls about 8% of Class A shares. Hedge fund manager Mark Rachesky, Lions Gate’s chairman, is the biggest investor with a 19% Class A stake. He has owned shares since 2004 and backed the studio in fighting off a takeover by Carl Icahn in 2010.A spokeswoman for Malone did not return requests for comment. A spokeswoman for Rachesky declined to comment.Trends sweeping Hollywood will only make it more difficult for Lions Gate to remain independent. The merging of Disney and Fox’s film companies, and AT&T and Time Warner Inc., along with Comcast’s Universal Pictures, has created a trio of studios that own and produce well-known blockbuster movie franchises, such as the Marvel superhero universe and DC Comics. The result is a small group of big films increasingly dominating the box office.Netflix ProductionMoreover, buyers for Lions Gate’s typically mid-budget fare may be shrinking. Disney and WarnerMedia are investing billions in making their own shows to lure subscribers to new streaming services. Netflix Inc., too, is producing more and more of its original content in-house, a big change from the early days when Lions Gate’s “Orange Is the New Black’’ helped make the streaming channel required viewing. That trend could lessen demand for TV programs and films made by independent studios.Lions Gate has had some successes lately. “John Wick: Chapter 3--Parabellum” helped lift it to fourth in the box office this year, ahead of competitors like Viacom Inc.’s Paramount Pictures and Sony Pictures. And the studio is still finding buyers for its shows, recently selling to HBO, NBC and even streaming platforms run by WarnerMedia and Apple Inc.Jim Gianopulos, chief executive officer of one of the smaller shops, Paramount Studios, said that appealing programming will ultimately win out regardless of production size. “Scale has its virtues, but the creative process is independent of it,” Gianopulos said in an interview.But some analysts aren’t so confident.“For the longest time, people thought the studios would come out as the winners because they own the content,” Ranganathan said. But in the wake of the mergers, “You need established franchises. If you don’t have scale, you can’t compete.”(Updates with analyst’s comment in fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Anousha Sakoui in Los Angeles at asakoui@bloomberg.net;Nabila Ahmed in New York at nahmed54@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: David Papadopoulos at papadopoulos@bloomberg.net, ;Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.net, Larry ReibsteinFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Netflix Leads in Global Streaming Revenue
    Market Realist2 days ago

    Netflix Leads in Global Streaming Revenue

    Though Google’s YouTube (GOOGL) is the most watched streaming platform in the world, Netflix (NFLX) tops the charts when it comes to revenue, according to Venture Beat. In the last year, Netflix has reported sales of $15.8 billion.

  • How to avoid becoming the ‘bank of Mom and Dad’ for your adult child
    MarketWatch2 days ago

    How to avoid becoming the ‘bank of Mom and Dad’ for your adult child

    College graduation is upon us, which means many empty-nesters will suddenly find themselves with not-so-empty nests…and, if they’re not careful, empty wallets. This trend can have crippling financial consequences for both parents and their adult children. It’s important that parents set boundaries and expectations, not just to protect their future nest egg, but to set their children up for a life of financial security.

  • How Netflix Stacks Up amid Intensifying Streaming Competition
    Market Realist2 days ago

    How Netflix Stacks Up amid Intensifying Streaming Competition

    While Netflix (NFLX) continues to be a market leader in the streaming space, it's facing competition from Hulu, Amazon Prime (AMZN), the Walt Disney Company (DIS), YouTube (GOOGL), Apple TV, and WarnerMedia (T). Let's look at the overall video streaming market and how these players stack up.

  • These early retirees bought their ‘disgusting’ house in Montana with cash and budget less than $1 a pound for food
    MarketWatch2 days ago

    These early retirees bought their ‘disgusting’ house in Montana with cash and budget less than $1 a pound for food

    Some may say Jillian Johnsrud has a frugal lifestyle, but, if you ask her, she’d say she’s living the dream. Johnsrud, who lives in Kalispell, Mont., with her husband and five children, has always been consistent in how she spends money: It only goes toward what she and her family value, and nothing more.

  • Everything coming to Netflix in July — and what’s leaving
    MarketWatch2 days ago

    Everything coming to Netflix in July — and what’s leaving

    Summer is officially here. And for subscribers looking to while away their vacation time, Netflix is releasing a bevy of blockbuster shows.

  • China's iQiyi looks abroad after hitting 100 million paying subscribers
    Reuters2 days ago

    China's iQiyi looks abroad after hitting 100 million paying subscribers

    BEIJING (Reuters) - iQiyi, China's answer to Netflix, intends to push harder into overseas markets such as North America and Japan after the video-streaming service hit a milestone of 100 million paying subscribers this month, a senior executive said on Monday. The company, which has been locked in a cash-burning fight with Tencent's video site and Alibaba-backed Youku Tudou in China, wants to distribute more of its self-produced content in North America, Singapore, South Korea and Japan, where they were seeing growing interest in Chinese-language shows, iQiyi's President of Membership and Overseas Business, Yang Xianghua, told Reuters in an interview.

  • Original Content podcast: Netflix's 'When They See Us' is difficult-but-essential viewing
    TechCrunch4 days ago

    Original Content podcast: Netflix's 'When They See Us' is difficult-but-essential viewing

    "When They See Us," a new miniseries on Netflix, can be so infuriating that it's hard to watch — especially its first hour, which depicts the arrest of the teenaged boys who became known as The Central Park Five, and shows police detectives coercing them into confessing to a brutal rape. Some of us struggled to get through that first episode, and the episodes that follow have plenty of painful moments too, but "When They See Us" rewards viewers who persist with a moving and unforgettable dramatization of all the ways the system failed Yusef Salaam, Korey Wise, Kevin Richardson, Raymond Santana and Antron McCray. The show is already having an impact, with President Donald Trump facing questions about his aggressive campaign to have the death penalty applied to five boys who were ultimately exonerated (Trump remains unapologetic).

  • Get Ready for More Hulu Originals
    Motley Fool4 days ago

    Get Ready for More Hulu Originals

    Hulu is in a similar spot as Netflix was just a few years ago.

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