NSANY - Nissan Motor Co., Ltd.

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed price. Currency in USD
8.38
+0.41 (+5.08%)
At close: 3:59PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close7.97
Open8.53
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's range8.25 - 8.53
52-week range5.78 - 14.65
Volume246,869
Avg. volume298,858
Market cap16.279B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.25
PE ratio (TTM)2.52
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield0.36 (4.58%)
Ex-dividend date26 Sep 2019
1y target estN/A
  • Bloomberg

    How Covid-19 Has Made Brexit Even Harder

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- It came as no surprise that a fourth round of trade negotiations between the U.K. and the EU has produced no big breakthrough. Once again, there is talk about Britain separating from the EU in December without a trade deal in place; Bank of England Governor Andrew Bailey told banks this week to prepare for just that.Why hasn’t the coronavirus pandemic changed the Brexit narrative, forced an outbreak of reasonableness between U.K. and EU negotiators or at least made compromise more likely? It’s a fair question. The Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish administrations have all said they would like Prime Minister Boris Johnson to extend the current one-year transition period through 2021 or 2022, which he can legally do if he makes the request to the EU by the end of this month. On Wednesday, the Scottish government said that without an extension, Scottish gross domestic product could be up to 1.1% lower after two years, costing 3 billion pounds ($3.8 billion) of lost activity.Polls have suggested the U.K. public would favor an extension. Given the enormous costs of dealing with the pandemic — which in Britain’s case involves one of the world’s most generous furlough schemes — you would think the U.K. would seek to avoid the increased costs and uncertainty of forgoing a trade deal and moving to World Trade Organization terms.Perhaps the U.K. will come around eventually; these negotiations never really reveal themselves until the eleventh hour. Germany’s ambassador to Brussels suggested as much this week. But, crucially, he noted that a breakthrough will require the U.K. to accept some loss of sovereignty.  The idea that the pandemic might moderate U.K.-EU trade talks was more plausible a couple of months ago. If the virus produced an economic crisis in Europe, or undermined the unity of the 27 member states in the negotiations, then that might have changed the balance of forces. But Europe seems to have weathered both the health care crisis and the economic consequences far better than many predicted. And so far the bloc seems determined to hold the line, even if it means no deal is possible by the end of the year.There are also several reasons why Johnson and U.K. negotiators are unwilling to compromise. One is political: Johnson owes his job and his popularity (even if it has been dented by his virus response) to Brexit. That, ironically, may limit his room for maneuver now. The U.K. officially left the EU on Jan. 31, but Brexiters are still highly suspicious of any delays to Britain leaving the EU’s single market and striking its own trade deals, which Johnson promised would happen at the end of this year. An extension would require the U.K. to continue paying funds into the EU budget, something that is not likely to go down well with either Parliament or public.And that’s before considering the other compromises required. There is no deal Britain can strike that doesn’t involve giving up some control, in order to accept some EU rules and regulations and retain access to its single market, as political risk consultant Mujtaba Rahman has argued. Britain could give ground on EU demands for continued access to U.K. fishing waters — the U.K. fishing industry is symbolically important but tiny, and sells 80% of its catch to the EU market. But Brussels’ insistence that the U.K. commit to following EU rules on workers’ rights, social and environmental rules and other so-called level-playing field commitments is seen by Brexiters as undermining the whole point of leaving the EU.There is no doubt that leaving the EU’s single market at the end of this year will bring costs. But camouflaged by the pandemic’s effects, and mitigated by the huge upswing of debt-fueled government spending, Brexiters may argue there is no better time to bite the bullet. The coronavirus pandemic is forecast to hit GDP over 13% this year, while the economic impact of Brexit has been estimated to result in foregone growth of 8% of GDP over a 15-year period.The range of issues on which the U.K. and the EU are negotiating also go far beyond fisheries, financial services and level-playing field provisions. There are disagreements over, among other things, the recognition of professional qualifications, procurement rules, the sharing of data and information for security purposes and the implementation of the Irish Protocol, the key part of the divorce deal that preserved an open border between Northern Ireland and EU-member Ireland. There is no way this range of trade issues can be resolved, with even the best of intentions and no pandemic crisis, in the limited time available. The U.K. and the EU will be working through their new normal for years to come, whether or not they strike a deal at the end of this one.Several realities might compel Johnson to strike a limited deal and dress it up as a victory. With unemployment rising, and companies taking on debt and furloughing workers, the pressure on Johnson to prevent manufacturers like Nissan, Britain’s largest carmaker, from shutting down will only intensify. Many of these companies are in precisely the parts of the country whose blue-collar, former Labour-supporting voters handed Johnson the December election.The idea that both Brexit and the pandemic would provide Britain with the opportunity to reshore some production, as well as shift supply chains away from the EU, sounds fine, but it won’t be straightforward. Reshoring will take significant investment and time. For companies whose balance sheets have been loaded with debt, that investment may be difficult. Given U.K. labor costs and environmental and social regulations, reshoring will also mean higher costs up the value chain. Energy costs, the availability of skilled labor, planning restrictions and other barriers will also slow things down.The possibility of a rupture in U.K.-EU trade negotiations — leading to customs barriers and other uncertainties for which Britain is not well prepared — might concentrate minds toward the end of this year. But so far, the pandemic hasn’t made getting a Brexit deal any easier.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Therese Raphael is a columnist for Bloomberg Opinion. She was editorial page editor of the Wall Street Journal Europe.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Nissan warns UK plant 'unsustainable' without EU trade deal - BBC
    Reuters

    Nissan warns UK plant 'unsustainable' without EU trade deal - BBC

    Nissan's car manufacturing plant in Sunderland, northern England, which employs 7,000, is "unsustainable" if Britain leaves the European Union without a trade deal, it said on Wednesday. Ashwani Gupta, the Japanese company's global chief operating head, told the BBC its commitment to the car plant, the United Kingdom's largest, could not be maintained if there was no tariff-free access to the bloc. The EU is the biggest market for the factory, which made just under 350,000 vehicles last year and builds the Qashqai, Juke and Leaf models.

  • Nissan warns UK’s largest car plant will not survive no-deal Brexit
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Nissan warns UK’s largest car plant will not survive no-deal Brexit

    The UK plant won't be 'sustainable' if Nissan does not have tariff-free access to the EU market, the company said.

  • Nissan sees cost of quitting Barcelona at up to $1.7 billion, source says
    Reuters

    Nissan sees cost of quitting Barcelona at up to $1.7 billion, source says

    Nissan Motor Co has estimated the closure of its plants in Barcelona could cost up to around 1.5 billion euros ($1.7 billion), a union source told Reuters on Monday. A Nissan spokesman declined to comment. The decision to leave Barcelona was announced by the Japanese carmaker last week as part of a turnaround plan, triggering protests by workers and a commitment by Madrid to do all it can to convince the company to stay.

  • Auto Stock Roundup: NSANY Incurs Biggest Loss in 20 Years, AZO Beats on Q3 Earnings
    Zacks

    Auto Stock Roundup: NSANY Incurs Biggest Loss in 20 Years, AZO Beats on Q3 Earnings

    Nissan (NSANY) incurs fiscal 2019 loss of 671.2 billion yen, which marks the worst in two decades. Meanwhile, AutoZone (AZO) tops fiscal Q3 earnings estimates despite coronavirus woes.

  • Bloomberg

    Tough Day for Europe’s Auto Jobs Signals More Pain to Come

    (Bloomberg) -- The extent of the devastation wrought on the European car industry by the coronavirus pandemic came into sharp focus on Friday when a sampling of major vehicle and parts manufacturers from France to Sweden revealed plans for at least 35,000 job cuts.Renault SA said it will eliminate about 14,600 workers worldwide and lower production capacity by almost a fifth as part of a sweeping three-year overhaul. The cuts in France were unveiled just as Stockholm-based Autoliv Inc., the world’s largest supplier of seat belts and airbags, said it’s also culling workers. And in Germany, BMW AG chimed in with sweetened incentives to get 5,000 workers to leave, while supplier ZF Friedrichshafen laid plans to eliminate as many as 15,000 positions.The thinning-out come as the continent’s auto sector emerges from a double blow dealt by the health crisis, which first snarled manufacturers’ supply chains that were reliant on parts from China, where the outbreak began. Then strict lockdowns in countries like France, Germany and the U.K. shut factories and dealerships overnight, leaving consumers at home and car inventories to pile up. As people around the world begin to emerge from self-isolation, there’s no telling when the public will start shelling out to buy new cars again.“This adverse economic situation has shown the limits of our business model, which was betting on unprecedented growth in emerging markets and in sales volumes,” acting Renault Chief Executive Officer Clotilde Delbos said as she provided details about how the bloated company would proceed with a deep and painful downsizing following years of expansion.The measures by the European companies herald a tricky time for politicians and top management. Governments extended unprecedented financial aid to keep businesses afloat and workers employed, and now companies are facing the necessity to re-size their industrial footprint to reflect shrinking demand.Renault’s plan includes the politically delicate task of trimming 4,600 positions in France, or about 10% of the carmaker’s total in its home country, through voluntary retirement and retraining. More than 10,000 further jobs will be scrapped in the rest of the world, pruning a global workforce of about 180,000 people.The measures round off a decisive week for the French company and its Japanese partners Nissan Motor Co. and Mitsubishi Motors Corp., drawing a line under a two-decade era of aggressive expansion under the alliance’s former leader, Carlos Ghosn, who was arrested in late 2018.The European car industry is particularly hard hit by the pandemic crisis because of overcapacity before the virus hit. Fiat is asking for a $6.9 billion state-backed loan to save its Italian operations and Volkswagen AG is facing pressure from German labor groups worried about job cuts at home. In Spain, Renault’s partner Nissan is contending with angry workers protesting a plan to close a plant in Barcelona, while French unions have called for a strike at a plant in the north of the country.In Germany, BMW is treading carefully around head-count reduction, negotiating with unions about giving more incentives to workers to persuade them to leave. It has been unable to meet its staffing reduction goal with existing measures, Chief Financial Officer Nicolas Peter said in an internal posting confirmed by the company. Those have included placing employees on unpaid leave and reducing working hours for those on shorter contracts.Parts MakersZF, one of the world’s biggest suppliers of brakes and other automotive parts, will pare back by between 12,000 and 15,000 jobs, according to people familiar with the matter, or 10% of its global workforce.At Autoliv, Chief Executive Officer Mikael Bratt said the company’s largest markets in the Americas and Europe were at a virtually stand still in April and a slow and volatile restart is leading to job cuts in the three months through June.“With our largest markets Americas and Europe virtually standing still in April, the challenges we are managing in the second quarter are unprecedented,” Bratt said.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Nissan (NSANY) Incurs Loss in FY19, Issues EV Ariya Update
    Zacks

    Nissan (NSANY) Incurs Loss in FY19, Issues EV Ariya Update

    Nissan (NSANY) reports net loss of 671.2 billion yen in fiscal 2019, mainly due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which hurt the company's production, sales and other business activities in all regions.

  • Japan backs nearly a third of $6.6 billion loans to Nissan - sources
    Reuters

    Japan backs nearly a third of $6.6 billion loans to Nissan - sources

    The Japanese government has guaranteed almost a third of the 7l3 billion yen ($6.65 billion) in loans Nissan Motor Co has secured from its main lenders to weather the COVID-19 pandemic, according to three people with knowledge of the plans. The automaker, seeking to return to profitability and stop bleeding cash, has secured 350 billion yen from its biggest lender, Mizuho Financial Group, of which 200 billion is backed by the state, the sources told Reuters on Friday. Among other lenders, the Development Bank of Japan will loan 180 billion yen, while Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group will lend 120 billion yen, the people said on condition of anonymity as the information is not public.

  • Spain says it will do all it can to reverse Nissan closure, workers protest
    Reuters

    Spain says it will do all it can to reverse Nissan closure, workers protest

    Spain said on Thursday it would do everything possible to stop Nissan from closing its main car factory in the country as angry workers burned tyres and shouted "War" outside the Barcelona plant. The decision by Japan's Nissan Motor Co earlier on Thursday to shut the 3,000-worker plant from December as part of global cost cuts is a blow for the euro zone's fourth-largest economy at a time when unemployment is rising and a recession is looming due to the coronavirus crisis. The government, which said in January after meeting officials from the Renault-Nissan alliance that jobs at the plant were "guaranteed," lamented the decision and urged Nissan to look at other options.

  • Nissan Has Sufficient Cash on Hand as China Remains Growth Market, COO Says
    Bloomberg

    Nissan Has Sufficient Cash on Hand as China Remains Growth Market, COO Says

    May.28 -- Nissan Motor Co. Chief Operating Officer Ashwani Gupta discusses the automaker's financial position, how it is navigating current geopolitical tensions and the outlook for the auto industry with Bloomberg's Vonnie Quinn on "Bloomberg Markets."

  • Exclusive: Nissan settles dispute with Tamil Nadu over unpaid dues - sources
    Reuters

    Exclusive: Nissan settles dispute with Tamil Nadu over unpaid dues - sources

    Nissan Motor Co has agreed to settle a long-running dispute with the Indian state of Tamil Nadu after claiming it was owed 50 billion rupees ($660 million) in unpaid dues and damages, six sources told Reuters. As part of the settlement, the Japanese automaker is expected to receive between 14 billion rupees ($185 million) and 18 billion rupees ($238 million), two sources aware of the matter said. The dispute arose after Nissan said Tamil Nadu hadn't paid certain incentives under a 2008 agreement to set up a car plant in the southern state.

  • Exclusive: Nissan settles dispute with Indian state over unpaid dues - sources
    Reuters

    Exclusive: Nissan settles dispute with Indian state over unpaid dues - sources

    Nissan Motor Co <7201.T> has agreed to settle a long-running dispute with the Indian state of Tamil Nadu after claiming it was owed 50 billion rupees in unpaid dues and damages, six sources told Reuters. As part of the settlement, the Japanese automaker is expected to receive between 14 billion rupees ($185 million) and 18 billion rupees ($238 million), two sources aware of the matter said. The dispute arose after Nissan said Tamil Nadu hadn't paid certain incentives under a 2008 agreement to set up a car plant in the southern state.

  • Renault & Nissan Revamp Alliance to Combat Coronavirus Crisis
    Zacks

    Renault & Nissan Revamp Alliance to Combat Coronavirus Crisis

    The fortified alliance among Renault (RNLSY), Nissan (NSANY) and Mitsubishi focuses more on efficiency and competitiveness than on volumes.

  • Nissan must watch cash given possible risk of second virus outbreak - CEO
    Reuters

    Nissan must watch cash given possible risk of second virus outbreak - CEO

    Nissan Motor Co's cash situation is "tough" as the coronavirus has sapped car sales, and the automaker must be vigilant in the coming months as a second wave of infections may add to liquidity issues, CEO Makoto Uchida told Reuters on Thursday. "With the coronavirus situation, our cash liquidity is quite tough," Uchida told Reuters in an video interview after the automaker announced its latest recovery plan, while adding that he believed the virus situation would improve from the third quarter.

  • Renault to take 3.6 billion euro hit from Nissan losses
    Reuters

    Renault to take 3.6 billion euro hit from Nissan losses

    French carmaker Renault said on Thursday that losses at its Japanese partner Nissan, in which it has a 43% stake, would drag on its on net earnings by 3.6 billion euro ($3.96 billion) in the first quarter. Renault, which posted its first net loss in a decade in 2019, has like Nissan been struggling with faltering sales, a slide exacerbated this year by the coronavirus pandemic. Nissan posted an annual operating loss of 40.5 billion yen ($376 million) for the year to March 31, its worst performance since 2008/09, while net losses came in at 671.2 billion yen.

  • Reuters

    Japanese automakers' April sales more than halved

    Japan's top eight automakers together posted a decline of 54.4% in April sales, according to a Reuters calculation. Toyota Motor's worldwide sales including units Daihatsu and Hino fell 45% to 472,703 vehicles - the fourth straight month of declines. Toyota's performance was dragged down by a 51% slump in sales outside Japan.

  • Reuters

    Japanese automakers' April sales halved

    Japan's top eight automakers together posted a decline of 50.1% in April sales, according to a Reuters calculation. Toyota Motor's <7203.T> worldwide sales including units Daihatsu and Hino <7205.T> fell 45% to 472,703 vehicles - the fourth straight month of declines. Toyota's performance was dragged down by a 51% slump in sales outside Japan.

  • Nissan plans big cuts to go small after first loss in 11 years
    Reuters

    Nissan plans big cuts to go small after first loss in 11 years

    Nissan Motor Co <7201.T> outlined a new plan on Thursday to become a smaller, more efficient carmaker after the coronavirus pandemic exacerbated a slide in profitability that culminated in its first annual loss in 11 years. It will shut plants in Spain and Indonesia, leave the South Korean market and pull its Datsun brand from Russia as part of a strategy unveiled on Wednesday to share production globally with its partners Renault <RENA.PA> and Mitsubishi Motors <7211.T>. "I will make every effort to return Nissan to a growth path," Nissan Chief Executive Makoto Uchida said, adding that the company had learned from its past mistakes of chasing global market share at all costs.

  • Nissan slashes capacity by a fifth after first loss in 11 years
    Reuters

    Nissan slashes capacity by a fifth after first loss in 11 years

    Nissan Motor Co <7201.T> said on Thursday it would slash its production capacity by a fifth to help reduce its fixed costs by 300 billion yen (2.27 billion pounds) as it looks to become a smaller, more cost-efficient automaker following a slide in sales. The announcement came after Nissan posted an operating loss of 40.5 billion yen ($376 million) for the year ended March, its first loss in 11 years.

  • Spain says Nissan has decided to close its Barcelona plant
    Reuters

    Spain says Nissan has decided to close its Barcelona plant

    Japan's Nissan Motor Co <7201.T> has decided to close its factory in Barcelona, resulting in the loss of about 3,000 jobs as part of a worldwide restructuring plan, the Spanish government said on Thursday. The move is a blow for Spain at a time when unemployment is increasing, with a steep recession looming because of the coronavirus crisis. The government, which had said in January after a meeting with leaders from Renault and Nissan that jobs at the Barcelona plant were "guaranteed," urged the Japanese carmaker to look at other options for the Barcelona plant.

  • Nissan sets out survival plan after first loss in 11 years
    Reuters

    Nissan sets out survival plan after first loss in 11 years

    Nissan Motor Co <7201.T> unveiled a plan to become a smaller, more cost-efficient automaker on Thursday as it looks to recover from four years of tumbling profits that culminated in its first annual loss in 11 years. Nissan is aiming for a 5% operating profit margin and global market share of 6% under what is its second recovery plan in less than a year. Nissan posted an annual operating loss of 40.5 billion yen for the year to March 31, its worst performance since 2008/09.

  • Factbox: Renault and Nissan's plan to rebuild their alliance
    Reuters

    Factbox: Renault and Nissan's plan to rebuild their alliance

    The automaking alliance of Renault SA, Nissan Motor Co and Mitsubishi Motors Corp outlined a new strategy on Wednesday whereby the strongest partner takes the lead in areas such as new technologies and parts procurement. Under it, the alliance member with the strongest position in a market, product or technology will spearhead the group's efforts there, with the others supporting. Almost half of the alliance's vehicle lineup will be produced under the scheme by 2025, it said.

  • From boom to bottom: Renault and Nissan bet on deeper cooperation
    Reuters

    From boom to bottom: Renault and Nissan bet on deeper cooperation

    Since its founding in 1999, the partnership between Renault and Nissan was dominated by its leader, Carlos Ghosn. As Renault, Nissan and junior partner Mitsubishi repair their alliance, they are under pressure to recover from two years of falling vehicle sales, a problem exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic.

  • Renault, Nissan and Mitsubishi reboot alliance with new strategy
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Renault, Nissan and Mitsubishi reboot alliance with new strategy

    The new plan means less doubling up on development and production costs.

  • Renault and Nissan rule out merger as they unveil survival plan
    Reuters

    Renault and Nissan rule out merger as they unveil survival plan

    Renault, Nissan Motor Co and Mitsubishi Motors Corp ruled out a merger on Wednesday and doubled down on a plan to cooperate more closely on car production to save costs and salvage their troubled alliance. The companies have been hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic just as they were trying to rework their partnership following the arrest of its chief architect, Carlos Ghosn, who had been pushing for a merger despite stiff resistance from Nissan. The new plan, which entails cutting the alliance's vehicle ranges by a fifth, pooling manufacturing by region and capitalising on joint designs, is meant to serve as a peace treaty, sources have told Reuters.

By using Yahoo, you agree that we and our partners can use cookies for purposes such as customising content and advertising. See our Privacy Policy to learn more