OR.PA - L'Oréal S.A.

Paris - Paris Delayed price. Currency in EUR
288.60
+1.90 (+0.66%)
At close: 5:35PM CEST
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close286.70
Open281.70
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's range281.10 - 289.30
52-week range196.00 - 297.20
Volume410,211
Avg. volume546,448
Market cap161.413B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.47
PE ratio (TTM)43.33
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield3.85 (1.34%)
Ex-dividend date03 Jul 2020
1y target estN/A
  • What's the future for the L'oreal Sa (EPA:OR) share price?
    Stockopedia

    What's the future for the L'oreal Sa (EPA:OR) share price?

    Given the present disruption and volatility in the stock market, it is more important than ever to identify high quality stocks for your portfolio. That means...

  • Bloomberg

    Six Hours Will Decide India’s Next Digital Winners

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Time will be the next frontier in India’s digital battlefield; dollars will follow the hours consumers spend online.India has left a void in their day by banning 59 Chinese apps after a border dispute with its northern neighbor led to violent clashes. The video-sharing platform TikTok, which became a craze in towns and villages as a medium of expression, is gone. So are its smaller cousins, like Bigo Live and Likee.What can fill the gap? Thanks to the world’s cheapest data charges of 9 cents per gigabyte, Indian smartphone users are guzzling content for six hours plus. For local startups like Glance, which offers games, news and video on the mobile lock-screen, the ban on Chinese competition is a chance to add to its tally of 100 million daily active users. The country’s youth bulge also makes it a perfect occasion for homegrown education technology unicorns like Byju to scale up.But the ultimate prize may go to super-apps that meld content and commerce in the 16 Indian languages besides English that boast anywhere between 5 million to half a billion speakers. To not have to download multiple apps to do different things will save phone memory, an important consideration for those who access the internet on low-end devices. Tencent Holdings Ltd.’s WeChat, which offers everything from messaging to gaming and financial services, provides a successful template. Chinese users are also online for six hours a day, mostly to browse content, particularly social media. Although only 4% of their time is spent on e-commerce, it’s enough to drive $1.5 trillion in annual online sales. The smaller Indian market, with online sales of $40 billion, will want to copy the playbook.  The most obvious super-app candidate is billionaire Mukesh Ambani’s Jio Platforms Ltd., a four-year-old startup with an equity value of $65 billion, including more than $15 billion recently raised from investors including Facebook Inc., KKR & Co. and Silver Lake Partners. Before Jio eventually seeks a listing on Nasdaq or the New York Stock Exchange, Ambani would probably want it ready as a carriage-content-and-commerce powerhouse for half-a-billion people.Jio’s 4G telecom service already has roughly 400 million subscribers, though they currently don’t even pay $2 a month. The trick to a $100 billion-plus initial public offering would lie in using the partnership with Facebook to introduce features such as the WeChat mini-program via the popular WhatsApp messaging service. It lets users book hotels, order taxis, explore augmented reality to try on a new L’Oreal beauty product, or test-drive a Tesla — without leaving WeChat. When it comes to building product awareness and interest, these embedded mini-apps in China are now a fourth as effective as regular online stores run by JD.com Inc. and Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., according to McKinsey & Co. They will offer brands in India a chance to sell more — and more profitably — even in remote towns. The consulting firm found that younger consumers in smaller Chinese cities give more weight to advice from social-media influencers and referrals by friends than their counterparts in larger metropolitan areas. This will probably hold true for India as well. As for the actual commerce, JioMart, Ambani’s new e-commerce platform, would take orders and — if the regulator permits it — accept payments via WhatsApp. Staples could be delivered by traditional neighborhood stores, with Jio helping connect them to buyers. For discretionary products, Ambani may use his Reliance Retail Ltd., already the country’s largest bricks-and-mortar retailer. It won’t be too hard to grease the wheels of super-app commerce with credit. Local lenders will be desperate for a new source of balance-sheet expansion after absorbing inevitable losses from the pandemic and lockdown. Still, the road to satisfied digital customers will be long and bumpy because of India’s creaky infrastructure. Keeping users hooked with novel content will therefore be crucial. Facebook is building a new version of Quest virtual reality headsets; the Silicon Valley firm is also acquiring studios that make VR games. Jio, which wants its set-top box to support online gaming, could find opportunities for collaboration.However, the main entertainment fare will still be cricket and Bollywood. Last year, Ambani promised Jio First Day First Show — movies streamed to broadband customers on the day of their theater release. With Covid-19 shutting down cinemas, producers in India need digital alternatives; audiences need their fix.  Although Ambani appears to be ahead, his won’t be India’s only super-app. Amazon.com Inc. has pledged to invest $5.5 billion in the country, while Walmart Inc. has plowed in $16 billion to acquire local e-commerce leader Flipkart Online Services Pvt. Potentially, they — or Alphabet Inc.’s Google — could seek telecom and digital media partners.Western tech firms were broadly shut out of China’s digital revolution. In India, they’ll join the fray, hoping for insights that will come in handy in other emerging markets. But India will still prefer local control over the super-apps. Six hours a day of 1.3 billion people — and all the data that flows from it — is a coveted resource, something politicians won’t want slipping out of their sphere of influence. This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andy Mukherjee is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies and financial services. He previously was a columnist for Reuters Breakingviews. He has also worked for the Straits Times, ET NOW and Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Google, Amazon Funnel Money to Virus Conspiracy Sites: Study
    Bloomberg

    Google, Amazon Funnel Money to Virus Conspiracy Sites: Study

    (Bloomberg) -- Digital advertising platforms run by Google, Amazon.com Inc. and other tech companies will funnel at least $25 million to websites spreading misinformation about Covid-19 this year, according to a study released Wednesday.Google’s platforms will provide $19 million, or $3 out of every $4 that the misinformation sites get in ad revenue. OpenX, a smaller digital ad distributor, handles about 10% of the money, while Amazon’s technology delivers roughly $1.7 million, or 7%, of the digital marketing spending these sites will receive, according to a research group called the Global Disinformation Index.GDI made the estimates in a study that analyzed ads running between January and June on 480 English language websites identified as publishers of virus misinformation. Some of the ads were for brands including cosmetics giant L’Oreal SA, furniture website Wayfair Inc. and imaging technology company Canon Inc. The data exclude social-media and online-video services, so the true total is likely much higher.“This report is flawed in that it neither defines what should be considered disinformation nor are its revenue calculations transparent or realistic,” a Google spokesperson said.The company doesn’t check whether websites are publishing truthful or accurate information before running ads. However, the internet giant reviewed 10 articles highlighted by the study where Google ads ran. It demonetized five of the web pages, meaning it removed the ability to make money from ads. “Google has strict publisher policies designed to prevent harmful, dangerous and fraudulent content from monetizing. We also continue to take an aggressive approach to COVID-19 content that makes harmful medical claims contradicting the guidance of global health authorities,” the spokesperson added. Amazon did not respond to requests for comment. Governments and health officials are still learning more about the virus, and this has allowed misinformation to flourish online. Silicon Valley giants have pledged to crack down, and Alphabet Inc.’s Google has removed ads from sites that violate its policies. However, GDI thinks these platforms need to do more to limit the spread of misinformation.“The difference between what the companies say publicly about their dedication to not monetizing hate speech and harmful content, especially around the pandemic, is not matching up with what our data is telling us that’s actually happening,” said Danny Rogers, co-founder of the Global Disinformation Index.In an ad delivered on May 19 by Amazon, a L’Oreal product was promoted on Americanthinker.com next to an article titled “Is Big Pharma Suppressing Hydroxychloroquine?” Earlier this month, Google served up a Bloomberg News ad on the website Bigleaguepolitics.com, according to the GDI report.The Global Disinformation Index is a U.K.-based research group that provides disinformation risk ratings on media sites all over the world. GDI said it presented Google, Amazon and OpenX with the latest findings from its report and none of the tech companies provided a formal response. The group updates its research weekly and often tells tech companies when their platforms place ads on misinformation sites.The research group releases this information, in part, as a way to alert advertisers when their marketing spots show up on this kind of website. These brands can help by pulling ads from tech platforms when they see issues like this, Rogers said.(Updates with no comment from Amazon in sixth paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • L'Oreal to nominate CEO successor, drawn internally, by autumn
    Reuters

    L'Oreal to nominate CEO successor, drawn internally, by autumn

    L'Oreal's Chairman and Chief Executive Jean-Paul Agon said on Tuesday he expected the cosmetic group's nominations committee to propose a candidate to succeed him by the autumn as his mandate expires. Agon told a shareholder meeting that the board of the French group, which is behind brands including Garnier and Lancome, had already recommended his successor should come from inside the company, as has been the case for previous handovers. The succession comes as beauty retailers grapple with the coronavirus crisis that has hit sales after stores closed during government-enforced lockdowns, although L'Oreal has said it has seen signs of recovery as these measures ease.

  • 'Glow' to replace 'whitening' in some L'Oreal skin products
    Reuters

    'Glow' to replace 'whitening' in some L'Oreal skin products

    L'Oreal will gradually replace "white" or "fair" with "glow" or "even" for some products designed to help even out skin tones, the cosmetic group's chief executive said on Tuesday. The French company - the world's biggest manufacturer of beauty products, including brands Maybelline and Garnier - said last week it would change its labelling after a similar move by Unilever. Unilever and L'Oreal are two big players in the global market for skin whitening creams used in many Asian, African and Caribbean countries where fair skin is often considered desirable.

  • Plastic packaging to get the chop at Garnier maker L'Oreal
    Reuters

    Plastic packaging to get the chop at Garnier maker L'Oreal

    L'Oreal <OREP.PA> aims to cut out non-recycled plastic packaging by 2030 and bring in greener products like solid shampoo bars under its flagship Garnier brand as it steps up an environmental push, its chief executive said on Thursday. L'Oreal, which is also behind brands such as Maybelline and Lancome, added it would further cut back on emissions at offices and factories and improve the way it sources ingredients for cosmetics as part of new sustainability targets. The group plans to shake up the packaging of beauty products in particular, with all plastic casings either made from recycled plastic or natural derivatives in 10 years, compared to 15% by end-2020, CEO Jean-Paul Agon said.

  • Unilever's 'Fair & Lovely' to get makeover after backlash
    Reuters

    Unilever's 'Fair & Lovely' to get makeover after backlash

    Unilever will drop the word "fair" from its "Fair & Lovely" skin lightening products, it said on Thursday, in the latest makeover of a brand in response to a global backlash against racial prejudice. Skin lightening cosmetics have a huge market in South Asia, but their promotion is being questioned, especially in the wake of the Black Lives Matter movement. Earlier this month, Johnson & Johnson said it would stop selling skin-whitening creams in Asia and the Middle East, while PepsiCo said it would change the name and brand image of its Aunt Jemima pancake mix and syrup.

  • Brands tout Black heritage as some shoppers question authenticity
    Reuters

    Brands tout Black heritage as some shoppers question authenticity

    L'Oreal SA <OREP.PA>, Unilever <ULVR.L> <UNA.AS> and other multinationals that acquired personal-care brands founded by Black people are moving to reassure their core customers, some of whom have pledged in the wake of racial-justice protests to direct their spending toward only Black-owned companies. L'Oreal's multicultural beauty brand Carol's Daughter, which was founded by a Black woman in her Brooklyn kitchen in 1993 and named for her mother, said June 10 that it wanted to "clear some things up" when it posted a message to its Instagram page. "Carol's Daughter is Black-founded, and Black-led, and joined the L'Oreal family of brands in 2014," it said.

  • Exclusive: Chanel, Revlon, L'Oreal pivoting away from talc in some products
    Reuters

    Exclusive: Chanel, Revlon, L'Oreal pivoting away from talc in some products

    Chanel, Revlon and L'Oreal, three of the biggest brands in cosmetics, are quietly moving away from using talc in some products as U.S. cancer lawsuits and consumer concerns mount. Luxury beauty company Chanel has removed talc from a loose face powder and dropped a talc body powder because of negative perceptions around the mineral, court documents reviewed by Reuters show. Revlon Inc removed talc from its body products, and L'Oreal SA is exploring alternatives for the mineral, those companies told Reuters.

  • Fast-growing Madison Reed is eyeing men's hair next; "We're going to blow the doors off that market"
    TechCrunch

    Fast-growing Madison Reed is eyeing men's hair next; "We're going to blow the doors off that market"

    Amy Errett's company, Madison Reed, sells women's in-home hair coloring products. Not only has the seven-year-old outfit been slowly chipping away at the dominant personal care giants like L'Oreal that have long controlled what's currently a $30 billion market, but during one of the most dramatic economic downturns of the past century, it has been attracting new customers. In fact, Errett -- who was previously a VC with Maveron and has a side hustle as a venture partner with True Ventures -- says the 300-person company is seeing revenue in excess of $100 million per year and that it will be profitable in the second half of this year.

  • Should You Be Tempted To Sell L'Oréal S.A. (EPA:OR) Because Of Its P/E Ratio?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should You Be Tempted To Sell L'Oréal S.A. (EPA:OR) Because Of Its P/E Ratio?

    Today, we'll introduce the concept of the P/E ratio for those who are learning about investing. We'll show how you can...

  • Can L'oreal Sa ride out the Covid-19 economic shock?
    Stockopedia

    Can L'oreal Sa ride out the Covid-19 economic shock?

    Economic shockwaves caused by Covid-19 have plunged stock markets into turmoil, but some shares are better able to absorb this volatility than others - and L'o...

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-EZ industrial production: Long way back to 2017 highs

    * EZ industry output suffers record fall in March Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters. You can share your thoughts Joice Alves (joice.alves@thomsonreuters.com) and Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@thomsonreuters.com) in London and Stefano Rebaudo (stefano.rebaudo@thomsonreuters.com) in Milan. The pandemic came as a huge blow to EZ manufacturers, with industry output suffering its deepest monthly fall on record.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-When will a vaccine be ready? Here's a guess!

    * EZ industry output suffers record fall in March Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters. You can share your thoughts Joice Alves (joice.alves@thomsonreuters.com) and Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@thomsonreuters.com) in London and Stefano Rebaudo (stefano.rebaudo@thomsonreuters.com) in Milan. A limited number of vaccine doses could be available before year end, says the European pharma team at Credit Suisse.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    MORNING BID-Grand failures

    The views expressed are her own.) "You will get business failures on a grand scale," was the warning last night from St Louis Federal Reserve President James Bullard. Expect his boss, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell, to repeat that message tonight. Fed funds futures are pricing in rates of about a basis point below zero by April 2021.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Opening snapshot: Risk-off mood hits banks, Vodafone up

    You can share your thoughts Joice Alves (joice.alves@thomsonreuters.com) and Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@thomsonreuters.com) in London and Stefano Rebaudo (stefano.rebaudo@thomsonreuters.com) in Milan. Risk-off mood gripped the financial markets on fresh fears about a second wave of the coronavirus outbreak, while the gradual easing in lockdowns is under way. While utilities, retail and telcos are standing their ground even if in negative territory.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-On the radar: L'Oreal, banks, Aston Martin and Volvo

    You can share your thoughts Joice Alves (joice.alves@thomsonreuters.com) and Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@thomsonreuters.com) in London and Stefano Rebaudo (stefano.rebaudo@thomsonreuters.com) in Milan. Commerzbank posted a worse than expected net loss of 295 million euros, as the lender undergoes a restructuring due to the coronavirus outbreak. Commerzbank shares are down 2.3% in early trade.

  • L'Oreal pledges 150 million euros to fight climate change, support women
    Reuters

    L'Oreal pledges 150 million euros to fight climate change, support women

    The French firm, which makes Garnier shampoo and Lancome creams, said it would give 50 million euros to local and grassroots associations combating job insecurity, providing emergency aid and fighting rising violence against women. The group also pledged 50 million euros towards restoring damaged ecosystems and a further 50 million for projects promoting a circular economy, such as recycling and efforts to cut down on plastic waste. The company said that aside from this "L'Oreal For The Future" plan, it would present a new sustainable development programme for 2030 at the end of June.

  • Ninja Van’s Big-Ticket Funding Signals Startup Deal Resilience
    Bloomberg

    Ninja Van’s Big-Ticket Funding Signals Startup Deal Resilience

    (Bloomberg) -- Singapore’s Ninja Van has raised $279 million from backers including France’s GeoPost SA and ride-hailing giant Grab Holdings Inc., scoring one of Southeast Asia’s largest startup investments since Covid-19 was declared a pandemic.Facebook co-founder Eduardo Saverin’s B Capital Group and Monk’s Hill Ventures were among those that took part in the parcel delivery firm’s Series D round, completed after the outbreak drove a surge in online shopping among people sheltering at home. The Southeast Asian startup joins a select club of firms that have raised significant money this year, including Indonesian online marketplace GudangAda with a $25.4 million deal.The coronavirus outbreak and its accompanying economic fallout is stress-testing the region’s once high-flying startup ecosystem. But the twin Southeast Asian deals announced Tuesday underscore how investors continue to explore industries from e-commerce to gaming and telehealth, regarded as more resilient to or even beneficiaries of rolling lockdowns. Globally, tech investment has sputtered since the outbreak spooked deal-makers, shuttered smaller outfits and forced cash-burning corporations from Oyo to Grab to rein in spending. Just 44 Silicon Valley startups won funding in March, down from 126 two months prior, according to law firm Fenwick & West LLP.“The Covid scenario would be very helpful because dynamics have changed,” Chief Executive Officer Lai Chang Wen told Bloomberg Television’s Haslinda Amin and Yvonne Man on Tuesday. “With this renewed focus on e-commerce, we think this will be an inflection point for e-commerce in Southeast Asia.”Much remains uncertain and many tech companies warn the business environment could deteriorate unpredictably should Covid-19 persist into the second half. Underscoring the extent of the fallout, Indonesia on Tuesday posted its weakest economic growth since 2001.But for now, Ninja Van, which helps e-commerce clients deliver more than a million packages daily across six Southeast Asian countries, is benefiting from a spike in orders. Its latest fundraising surpassed a $200 million target set about a year ago and lifted its total financing to about $400 million, Lai said.The investor interest “shows that logistics is something which is around to stay,” he said. “Social distancing will have a profound effect.”He declined to disclose the company’s valuation, describing it as “vanity metrics.” “People who get overly fixated on that make a lot of mistakes,” he added.Lai, a 32-year-old former derivatives trader at Barclays Plc, founded Ninja Van in 2014 with two friends, aiming to use technology to make the logistics market more efficient. They picked the name Ninja Van to reflect the idea of working quietly to get things done. It now helps consumer brands from L’Oreal to Wing Tai Holdings Ltd.’s G2000 label digitize their businesses and sell to consumers, diversifying its clients beyond e-commerce platforms. The Singapore startup also aims to handle deliveries of merchandise for smaller merchants such as social media influencers.“It certainly isn’t the sexiest of companies but logistics has become a hot space since we invested five years ago,” said Lim Kuo-Yi, a managing partner of Monk’s Hill Ventures, the company’s first institutional investor. “Very few companies at this scale have shown the ability to cover the region comprehensively and is able to demonstrate a credible path to profitability.”Read more: Only 44 Startups In Silicon Valley Got Funded Last MonthOther backers in its latest round include Carmenta, Golden Gate Ventures Growth Fund and Intouch Holdings. Besides Singapore, Ninja Van operates in Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam and employs more than 30,000 people, including some 20,000 full-time drivers. It’s profitable in half of those markets but needs time for the whole business to become “solidly profitable,” Lai said. Ninja Van may do another round of funding before a sale or IPO, he added.“All (exit) options are on the table,” he added. “But right now, solidly profitable is what we focus on.”Separately, GudangAda, which helps mom and pop stores buy goods such as cooking ingredients, instant noodles and beverages from wholesalers, said it secured $25.4 million in a round led by Sequoia India and Alpha JWC Ventures. It plans to recruit more than 100 employees this year, adding to a workforce of about 350, according to founder and Chief Executive Officer Stevensang, who like many Indonesians goes by one name.“We do have plans to strengthen our mid-senior team throughout the rest of this year, especially in areas of technology and product management,” he said in an interview.Read more: Sequoia India, Alpha JWC Lead Latest Online Marketplace Funding(Updates with CEO’s TV interview from the fourth paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Will telcos be left behind post Covid, QE?

    * HSBC, UBS, Santander: mixed Q1 results Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters. You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@thomsonreuters.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@thomsonreuters.com) and Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@thomsonreuters.com) in London and Stefano Rebaudo (stefano.rebaudo@thomsonreuters.com) in Milan.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Broadcasters hit harder by advertising decline, all focus on Q3

    * HSBC, UBS, Santander: mixed Q1 results Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters. You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@thomsonreuters.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@thomsonreuters.com) and Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@thomsonreuters.com) in London and Stefano Rebaudo (stefano.rebaudo@thomsonreuters.com) in Milan.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-French mom-and-pop investors in pandemic buying frenzy

    * HSBC, UBS, Santander: mixed Q1 results Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters. You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@thomsonreuters.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@thomsonreuters.com) and Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@thomsonreuters.com) in London and Stefano Rebaudo (stefano.rebaudo@thomsonreuters.com) in Milan. There's been quite a lot written about pasta and flour stockpiling but piling up stocks during the worst economic and financial crisis in living memory is an interesting one!

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-GRANOLAS heavier than the FAAAM'ous five

    * HSBC, UBS, Santander: mixed Q1 results Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters. You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@thomsonreuters.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@thomsonreuters.com) and Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@thomsonreuters.com) in London and Stefano Rebaudo (stefano.rebaudo@thomsonreuters.com) in Milan.

  • What Did L'Oréal S.A.'s (EPA:OR) CEO Take Home Last Year?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Did L'Oréal S.A.'s (EPA:OR) CEO Take Home Last Year?

    In 2006, Jean-Paul Agon was appointed CEO of L'Oréal S.A. (EPA:OR). First, this article will compare CEO compensation...

  • Glow at home: Beauty industry remakes product pitches in the age of coronavirus
    Reuters

    Glow at home: Beauty industry remakes product pitches in the age of coronavirus

    In: dewy skin, under-eye concealer, moisturized hands. As consumers' social and travel plans have evaporated and work is conducted online, beauty brands have had to quickly redirect their pitches to show how their products are still relevant. Marketing from brands such as L'Oreal-owned <OREP.PA> Maybelline and Revlon Inc <REV.N> on Instagram, Facebook and YouTube now feature products suited for date nights over FaceTime, work-related video conference calls and Zoom happy hours.

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