OR.PA - L'Oréal S.A.

Paris - Paris Delayed price. Currency in EUR
241.00
-5.60 (-2.27%)
At close: 5:36PM CET
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close246.60
Open240.00
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's range235.20 - 244.40
52-week range222.80 - 278.50
Volume1,982,702
Avg. volume464,428
Market cap134.51B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.47
PE ratio (TTM)36.19
EPS (TTM)6.66
Earnings date07 Feb 2020
Forward dividend & yield4.25 (1.72%)
Ex-dividend date28 Apr 2020
1y target est205.31
  • Bloomberg

    Go Ahead: Get on the Plane for That Riviera Vacation

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Just two weeks ago, the biggest fear frequent fliers faced was having their seatback punched by some jerk or, depending on your point of view, being filmed while punching some jerk’s seat. Now, the Covid-19 coronavirus is spreading steadily around the globe, but the fear it engenders has already done at least three laps. Travelers suddenly face a much more disturbing set of questions than why airplanes bother to make seats that recline if you’re not ever supposed to recline them.Just when you thought flying couldn’t get any more hellacious! Too-small seats are no longer just uncomfortable; they force you to be uncomfortably close to potentially coronavirus-infected fellow travelers. Seatback-punching is no longer just a bizarre outburst of airplane rage; it’s potentially a way to transfer germs from one row of seats to the next. Just the prospect of being cooped up in a flying tin can is enough to make that long-awaited vacation seem more terrifying than relaxing. This poses a real problem for the travel sector, as my colleague Andrea Felsted has detailed, especially since March is a popular time to get away. Colleges and universities would usually be sending their students home for spring break. Those of us in the Northern Hemisphere want to fly somewhere with sun (or snow). And spring is also a popular time for professional conferences.Nonetheless, some companies, like Cargill, Nestle and L’Oreal, have already banned non-essential international travel for their employees for at least the next two weeks. Some schools have canceled study-abroad programs and advised students not to travel to China, even if it’s where they call home.Maybe these are sensible precautions, or maybe they’re just symbolic gestures from leaders who want to be seen to be Doing Something. Other companies, like Coca-Cola and Heinz, have only asked employees to avoid countries experiencing major outbreaks. And the virus doesn’t seem to have slowed fashion industry professionals in Milan or Paris. Paris Fashion Week is continuing on schedule, with many industry workers having traveled directly to Paris from Milan — which is in Lombardy, the part of Italy that has thus far been the most affected.So if you have a trip coming up, should you still go?Over the past few days, a limitless supply of articles has tried to answer this question. The problem, though, is that so much about Covid-19 is still unknown. Thus the basic gist of most of this advice is to use common sense: Don’t go to a country experiencing a major outbreak, wash your hands often, don’t touch your face while you’re traveling, and use extra caution if you’re older or have a compromised immune system. (Older smokers may want to be especially careful, since Covid-19 affects the respiratory system.)I know what the entire internet has to say on this topic because my husband and I have texted approximately all of these articles to each other over the last 48 hours. We are set to celebrate our anniversary with a trip to the French Riviera in a couple of weeks, and the sudden uptick in Covid-19 cases in Europe has sparked a discussion over whether we should cancel. The U.S. government’s travel advice for Europe is rather blasé. Italy, for example, has been added to the list of countries where travelers should “exercise increased caution” — but its overall travel advisory level remains unchanged. The same is true of Spain, where hundreds of holiday-makers have been confined to a hotel in Tenerife, and France, where there have been a handful of cases and at least two deaths. As far as the government is concerned, terrorism and civil unrest are still bigger threats to U.S. travelers in these countries than the virus.As for airplanes — those flying Petri dishes — the chances of catching an illness while confined in one are probably less than we fear. On the one hand, yes, you’re crammed into a confined space with a bunch of strangers, but it’s not that different from being in any other crowded, enclosed space, like a subway car or a movie theater. Plus, that recycled air is filtered through a HEPA filter, the International Air Transport Association notes.Close proximity to sick passengers is the biggest risk factor: If you’re not sitting next to someone sick, you’re much less likely to get sick yourself. (Yes, you can use this column to justify the seat upgrade you’ve been longing for.) Frequent travelers swear by airborne-germ-limiting tactics like shutting off the overhead air vent or choosing a window seat. But the bigger issue may be the globules of sickness lying in wait on oft-touched surfaces: the handle on the lavatory door, the latch on the tray table, the touchscreen on the seatback in front of you, even the in-flight magazine. The solution is simple: Touch them as little as possible and, if you do touch them, wash your hands with soap and water before you touch your face.Everyone’s risk tolerance is different, as is everyone’s definition of “non-essential” travel. For me, the French Riviera sounds pretty darn essential. So unless things take a quick turn for the much worse, I think I’ll get on that airplane — armed with high-octane hand sanitizer and a resolution to leave the in-flight magazine untouched. After all, it’s not as if it’s a cruise ship.To contact the author of this story: Sarah Green Carmichael at sgreencarmic@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Katy Roberts at kroberts29@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Sarah Green Carmichael is an editor with Bloomberg Opinion. She was previously managing editor of ideas and commentary at Barron’s, and an executive editor at Harvard Business Review, where she hosted the HBR Ideacast. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • JPMorgan Joins Rush to Curb Global Travel as Virus Spreads
    Bloomberg

    JPMorgan Joins Rush to Curb Global Travel as Virus Spreads

    (Bloomberg) -- JPMorgan Chase & Co. curbed non-essential travel globally, joining a string of other corporate giants in restricting business trips as the spreading coronavirus risks becoming a pandemic.Because of the broadening spread of the virus, it’s now “restricting all international travel to essential travel only,” the New York-based bank said in a memo distributed to staff, confirmed by spokespeople. The move marks an escalation in its travel precautions, which had previously been limited to regions where the spread of the virus has been heaviest, such as parts of Asia and northern Italy.Banks around the world are acting to ensure they can keep their businesses running as the virus spreads, restricting travel, splitting up teams and traders to different locations and quarantining staff. The outbreak has halted a broad swath of deal making in Asia, but also on Wall Street. Banks such as HSBC Holdings Plc have also warned the virus may force them to set aside more money for soured loans.Outside the banking world, firms ranging from the world’s largest trader of farm crops to the biggest food and beverage company have also suspended business travel, increasing the risk to the global economy as markets tumble. Nestle SA, the employer of 291,000 people worldwide, was one of the first multinational companies to take the decisive step of halting business travel.The coronavirus is now at a “decisive” stage with the potential to become a pandemic, the head of the World Health Organization said in Geneva on Thursday. In Asia, the virus is spreading in countries outside China, where new cases are slowing. Japan announced it will close all schools, while South Korean infections have topped 2,000. It’s spreading in Europe and the Middle East, with countries including Italy, Iran and Sweden reporting more cases. Nigeria confirmed its first infection, the first reported in sub-Saharan Africa.“The outbreak can go in any direction based on how we handle it,” WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said during the group’s daily briefing in Geneva.In its memo, JPMorgan said before deciding on travel its staff should consider whether the meeting can be postponed, done remotely and if the travel will pose personal or firm-wide risk. “Employees are encouraged to bring their laptops and power cords home, test their remote access capabilities,” the bank said. The lender has 256,000 employees globally. Other banks are also taking measures. Credit Suisse Group AG has started to split its workers in South Korea into different offices to ensure business can continue, while lenders including Deutsche Bank AG and Goldman Sachs Group Inc. restricted travel to Italy, the worst-hit nation in Europe. Nomura Holdings Inc. has asked its employees to refrain from unnecessary travel to countries stricken by the virus.UBS Group AG put South Korea on a so-called level 2 as part of it business continuity planning, in line with Hong Kong and Singapore. At HSBC, South Korea is rated as an “increased caution,” meaning business travel can continue but employees should reconsider the need for the trip and avoid the heaviest hit areas of Daegu and Gyeongbuk, a spokeswoman said. Morgan Stanley has also restricted travel to and from South Korea.\--With assistance from Cathy Chan and Jun Luo.To contact the reporter on this story: Alfred Liu in Hong Kong at aliu226@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Candice Zachariahs at czachariahs2@bloomberg.net, Jonas Bergman, David ScanlanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • L'Oreal's online sales of make-up rose in China in February: CEO
    Reuters

    L'Oreal's online sales of make-up rose in China in February: CEO

    Online sales of L'Oreal make-up and skincare products had picked up in China in February and were even stronger than a year earlier, Chief Executive Jean-Paul Agon said on Friday. China is the Maybelline and Lancome maker's single-biggest market, and like rivals in the luxury goods industry, L'Oreal is bracing for a hit on demand due to the coronavirus health crisis as shops shut down and Chinese customers face travel bans. L'Oreal has so far offset some lost business through e-commerce sales, Agon said, adding that platforms like Alibaba and JD.com appeared to be "finding solutions" to counter delivery problems in some parts of China.

  • Bingeing Alone Isn’t Enough for Nestle
    Bloomberg

    Bingeing Alone Isn’t Enough for Nestle

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- It isn’t just Unilever NV that’s struggling to sell more food. Rival Nestle SA now expects to come up short of its self-imposed sales-growth target this year, and it’s counting on acquisitions to put it back on track.While Chief Executive Officer Mark Schneider met the lower end of  a goal for underlying operating margin 12 months early, it will take at least another year for the owner of the Nesquik and Nespresso brands to reach and sustain its annual sales growth objective of 4-6%, partly due to the effect of disposals.It’s a rare misstep for Nestle’s first external CEO for almost 100 years. Even with the 2% drop on Thursday, the shares are up more than 40% since his arrival in January 2017, outpacing Unilever. While Schneider’s made a good start selling off underperformers and making purchases in faster growing areas, such as coffee, pet food and meat substitutes, more reshaping is needed. He has traded — either acquired or moved  out of — businesses that accounted for about 12% of total sales in 2017. That’s ahead of his target for changing up 10% by the end of 2020. He’s not done yet. From here the focus will be more on acquisitions than disposals.While expanding in the right growth markets is key, Schneider should also go further in pruning the Swiss food giant. Possible culprits for offloading could be parts of the U.S. frozen foods business, especially pizzas, or some water assets, such as those mainstream brands that can’t be taken up market. The fact that Nestle wrote down the value of its Yinlu business in China could be a prelude to an exit from difficult divisions, for example making peanut milk. However, selling off these businesses may be trickier than previous disposals in confectionery, skincare and ice cream.There’s also a risk that Schneider, in an effort to turbocharge growth, becomes less disciplined when he buys. He indicated that he’s open to a wide array of options, the most promising being small or mid-sized purchases, particularly in the hot market for nutrition and metabolism. He lamented that last year was heavy on disposals, but light on purchases. That should change this year, but he shouldn’t be too eager and so strike rash deals.Schneider is comfortable in the pharmaceutical space, having led German healthcare company Fresenius SE before joining Nestle. Medical nutrition not only has higher growth prospects and margins than many food areas, but it is also less constrained by competition rules because Nestle doesn’t have such a big position. He most recently bolstered Nestle’s medical nutrition arm by acquiring gastrointestinal medication Zenpep and increased the investment in Aimmune Therapeutics Inc., which has developed a product to counter the effects of peanut allergies. It indicates that this area, particularly treatments related to the body’s metabolism, is likely to be a bigger focus.To fund any large-scale ambitions, Schneider has Nestle’s stake in L’Oreal SA, worth about 35 billion euros ($38 billion), to play with. The company has always said that it won’t part with this holding unless it has a strategic use for the proceeds, but but he seemed to be more open to an exit on Thursday. Small- to medium-sized deals wouldn’t require any change. A bigger transaction — which can’t be ruled out — might.Either way, Schneider can’t afford to take the wrong turn. Not only is activist Dan Loeb still on the register, but Nestle’s valuation has increased significantly under his tenure. The shares trade on about 22 times forward earnings, compared with about 20 times for Unilever.The premium is justified by Unilever’s recent sales stumble, as well as its slower pace of portfolio change and less focused approach to acquisitions. That doesn’t mean Nestle won’t be punished if it disappoints in the same way as its rival.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • L'Oréal S.A. Just Missed EPS By 11%: Here's What Analysts Think Will Happen Next
    Simply Wall St.

    L'Oréal S.A. Just Missed EPS By 11%: Here's What Analysts Think Will Happen Next

    It's been a good week for L'Oréal S.A. (EPA:OR) shareholders, because the company has just released its latest yearly...

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Sparkle fades as coronavirus risks wiping out luxury goods growth

    The luxury goods industry normally relishes the spotlight, but in the case of China's coronavirus it is rueing being one of the most globally exposed sectors to an epidemic that risks all-but wiping out its sales growth this year. Brands from Burberry to Estee Lauder are shutting stores and cutting profit forecasts as business in the industry's biggest market has virtually ground to a halt.

  • L'Oreal rallies as sales increase offsets China concerns
    Reuters

    L'Oreal rallies as sales increase offsets China concerns

    L'Oreal's shares rose on Friday after fourth-quarter earnings from the French cosmetics company helped to offset concerns over the impact of China's coronavirus health crisis on its business. The company's shares were up around 3.4% in early trading on Friday after L'Oreal reported late on Thursday that fourth-quarter revenue had risen 11.4% to 7.9 billion euros ($8.7 billion). The maker of Maybelline cosmetics said China's coronavirus crisis would have only a short-term hit on the company's Asian business, which is its biggest sales driver.

  • L'Oreal sees China virus temporarily weighing on sales in Asia
    Reuters

    L'Oreal sees China virus temporarily weighing on sales in Asia

    Maybelline maker L'Oreal forecast on Thursday that China's coronavirus health crisis would have a short-term hit on its Asian business, its biggest sales driver, though the group said it still expected to outperform cosmetics rivals in 2020. Thriving appetite from Chinese consumers for luxury creams such as L'Oreal's Lancome range has fuelled sales growth at the French firm, which exceeded expectations in the fourth quarter. The outbreak has killed over 500 people in China so far, and is leading to travel restrictions that could affect beauty sales in airport duty free lounges.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-New year rally succumbs to virus scare

    * European shares down sharply on China virus worries * Miners, luxury, airlines lead sectoral fallers * Italian banks outperform sector as regional vote brings relief * STOXX set for worst day since October * Volatility surges * Wall Street slumps 2% Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Joice Alves. The pan-European STOXX 600 index, France's CAC 40 and Germany's DAX are now in negative territory year-to-date as markets are heading for their biggest one-day fall in four months on fast-spreading China virus fears.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Buying the dip in mining?

    * European shares down sharply on China virus worries * Miners, luxury, airlines lead sectoral fallers * Italian banks outperform sector as regional vote brings relief * STOXX down 2%, set for worst day since October * Volatility surges Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Joice Alves.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Coronavirus outbreak fuels volatility surge

    * European shares down sharply on China virus worries * Miners, luxury, airlines lead sectoral fallers * Italian banks outperform sector as regional vote brings relief * STOXX down 2.1%, set for worst day since October * Volatility surges Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Joice Alves. Reach her on Messenger to share your thoughts on market moves: joice.alves.thomsonreuters.com@reuters.net CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK FUELS VOLATILITY SURGE (1134 GMT) Mounting fears about the coronavirus outbreak in China have fuelled a rare volatility surge across European stock markets.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Bleeding from virus: 586 out of 600 stocks in red

    * European shares down sharply on China virus worries * Miners, luxury, airlines lead sectoral fallers * Italian banks outperform sector as regional vote brings relief * STOXX down 2.1%, set for worst day since October Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Joice Alves. Airlines, hotels, cars, luxury goods, oil, industrial stocks, you name it, are all among fallers. Here's a snapshot of the intensity of the sell-off: (Thyagaraju Adinarayan) ***** LUXURY UPGRADES IN THE TIME OF CORNAVIRUS (1048 GMT) China is by far the No. 1 growth market for European luxury and the space is understandably hammered this morning on the mounting worries over the impact of the spreading Cornaviris.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-There goes the FTSE post-election buzz

    * European shares down sharply on China virus worries * Miners, luxury, airlines lead sectoral fallers * Italian banks rise as regional vote brings relief * STOXX down as much as 2%, set for worst day since October Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Joice Alves. Reach her on Messenger to share your thoughts on market moves: joice.alves.thomsonreuters.com@reuters.net THERE GOES THE FTSE POST-ELECTION BUZZ (1038 GMT) Among all the big casualties on the trading floor this morning is the post-election buzz which turbo-charged UK equities after Boris Johnson's landslide win in December.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Luxury: China virus stings hard, $50 bln wiped off

    * European shares open down sharply on China virus worries * Miners, luxury, airlines lead sectoral fallers * Italian banks rise as regional vote brings relief Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Joice Alves. Reach her on Messenger to share your thoughts on market moves: joice.alves.thomsonreuters.com@reuters.net LUXURY: CHINA VIRUS STINGS HARD, $50 BLN WIPED OFF (0925 GMT) It's not surprising to see more than 95% of the STOXX 600 constituents in red this morning as China's spreading virus outbreak is taking a toll on stocks ranging from miners to perfume makers. The jolt is immediately felt in the top luxury names in Europe with nearly $50 billion wiped off from their market value since the outbreak.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Japan, U.S. lead survey's corporate climate change action 'A List'

    BT , Danone, Microsoft and Sony are among 178 companies with top marks in the latest global ranking of transparency and action on climate change. Japan and the U.S. were the countries with the headquarters of the most 'A List' companies individually, while regionally, Europe as a bloc was home to the highest number. Companies are coming under pressure from customers and investors to step up efforts to help slow climate change in accordance with the 2015 Paris climate agreement to phase out greenhouse gas emissions by shifting away from fossil fuels.

  • Is L'Oréal S.A.'s (EPA:OR) 1.5% Dividend Worth Your Time?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is L'Oréal S.A.'s (EPA:OR) 1.5% Dividend Worth Your Time?

    Today we'll take a closer look at L'Oréal S.A. (EPA:OR) from a dividend investor's perspective. Owning a strong...

  • Mohawk Group: Invest in a Proven AI Model that Outsmarts Rivals in E-Commerce
    IPO-Edge.com

    Mohawk Group: Invest in a Proven AI Model that Outsmarts Rivals in E-Commerce

    Mohawk Group Holdings, Inc. Uses Algorithms to Design Products Such as the hOmeLabs Beverage Refrigerator and Cooler Mohawk Group Targets Consumer Product Categories Where Rating Trumps Brand Mohawk Uses AI to Improve Products, Market and Price Them Optimally Mohawk Only Months Away from Positive EBITDA Mohawk Trades at Deep Discount to High-Growth Technology Companies By […]

  • Hot Scoop! Ben & Jerry's Needs to Watch Out
    Bloomberg

    Hot Scoop! Ben & Jerry's Needs to Watch Out

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Nestle SA Chief Executive Officer Mark Schneider just proved his ability to be both strategic and creative as he methodically shapes the Swiss food giant, scooping and scraping up where he can.The company, which spans water, pet food and coffee, on Wednesday agreed to sell its U.S. ice cream business for $4 billion to Froneri, the joint venture it created three years ago with private equity group PAI Partners. The price equates to 2.2 times Nestle’s U.S. ice cream sales in 2018, similar to the multiple European rival Unilever NV achieved when it sold its spreads business to KKR & Co. almost exactly two years ago. That looks reasonable for Nestle’s unit, which includes the Haagen-Dazs brand in the U.S.With the sale, Schneider, a German-American educated at Harvard Business School, is very close to his target of changing up 10% of Nestle’s portfolio, helping to keep activist investor Dan Loeb happy. An outright sale would have been cleaner. But given that Froneri already holds Nestle’s European ice-cream assets, it was probably the easiest option.Nestle and PAI will each inject some funds into the joint venture to facilitate the deal. Even so Nestle should still receive between $3 billion and $4 billion in cash from the proceeds.Most importantly, there is scope for a fuller exit in time. PAI could acquire Nestle’s stake in the joint venture, or, more likely, the two could pursue an initial share sale for Froneri. Increasing sales growth, elevating profitability by developing Haagen-Dazs and cutting costs could potentially generate further value for Nestle in a few years’ time.That Nestle has been able to find a creative way to offload ice cream is encouraging. Schneider had already tackled many of the obvious disposal candidates within the group, including the U.S. confectionery and skincare divisions.Stay tuned for more. He may be equally imaginative with other parts of the group, such as its joint ventures in cereals with General Mills Inc., the U.S. maker of Cheerios, and in chilled dairy with Lactalis International, the French milk and cheese company.For example, Nestle has a few more ice cream divisions in Canada, Latin America and Asia that could be folded into Froneri in due course. But it’s likely Nestle didn’t want to rush it to avoid a bout of indigestion. There are other disposal candidates elsewhere in the group. It is already selling its Herta cooked meats business, while Bloomberg News has reported that it’s weighing the $1 billion sale of two Chinese brands.At least some parts of  the U.S. frozen-food division, such as pizzas, could be put on the block, although Nestle has so far stressed its commitment to staying in the business of frozen food. It doesn’t want to miss out on the latest trends with people cooking less and cutting down on meat, which has created a boom in vegetarian and vegan dishes. And although Nestle has restructured its waters business, indicating it wants to keep this division rather than offload it, it could always decide to carve out for sale the part that delivers bottles and dispensers directly to homes and offices.And of course there is Nestle’s stake in L’Oreal SA, although so far the group has remained committed to this. Nestle doesn’t need the money. Even with returning $20 billion to shareholders, year-end net debt is estimated just 1.4 times Ebitda. Deleveraging isn’t part of the strategy, indicating further capital returns. A wild card would be a big deal, for example in medical nutrition.In the meantime, it’s a question of delivering on Schneider’s strategy of steering a steady course between revenue-driven start-ups that make little profit and companies that prioritize margin expansion at the expense of investing in growth. So far, this has paid off for Nestle shareholders, with the stock up 27% this year. But the turn of events may be slightly worrying for Magnum owner Unilever, which now faces a more muscular competitor in ice cream.While Schneider has exhibited laser-like focus in M&A, Unilever’s relatively new CEO Alan Jope and incoming chairman, Nils Andersen, face the challenge of integrating the plethora of small acquisitions the Anglo-Dutch owner of Ben & Jerry’s has made over the past few years, all while trying to elevate sales growth.That was already a tall order. Now they’ll need to add avoiding a malfunction in the frozen aisle to their to-do list.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • What Does L'Oréal S.A.'s (EPA:OR) P/E Ratio Tell You?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Does L'Oréal S.A.'s (EPA:OR) P/E Ratio Tell You?

    Today, we'll introduce the concept of the P/E ratio for those who are learning about investing. To keep it practical...

  • L'Oreal's Lancome beefs up stores as luxury cosmetics take off
    Reuters

    L'Oreal's Lancome beefs up stores as luxury cosmetics take off

    L'Oreal's Lancome brand is planning to open a flagship store in China after launching its first major showcase in Paris this week, its chief executive said, as the company capitalizes on booming demand for high-end cosmetics. Lancome, one of the biggest brands of French cosmetics' group L'Oreal, already sells its creams and make-up though airport retailers, department stores and other networks, including 50 freestanding stores in China.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Another 12 months of trade pain?

    Welcome to the home for real-time coverage of European equity markets brought to you by Reuters stocks reporters and anchored today by Julien Ponthus. The bounce back we saw this morning quickly disappeared after Trump's comment and December turns out to be a disaster so far for stock markets. Trump's tweet on reinstating tariffs on steel and aluminium imports from Argentina and Brazil triggered the downfall.

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