PTR - PetroChina Company Limited

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
47.35
-0.77 (-1.60%)
At close: 4:02PM EST
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Previous close48.12
Open47.95
Bid47.23 x 2200
Ask47.27 x 1000
Day's range47.11 - 47.95
52-week range44.80 - 68.80
Volume106,235
Avg. volume99,419
Market cap140.055B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.32
PE ratio (TTM)10.76
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield2.33 (4.84%)
Ex-dividend date12 Sep 2019
1y target estN/A
  • China Energy Leaders Set for Shake-Up Amid Sector Revamp
    Bloomberg

    China Energy Leaders Set for Shake-Up Amid Sector Revamp

    (Bloomberg) -- Top executives at China’s leading energy companies are set for a power shake-up as the nation takes steps to reorganize and revamp its leadership and energy infrastructure.The executive changes at the state-owned giants come as the sector is under pressure to increase competition and boost domestic output in the face of growing dependence on energy imports. The government this week opened its upstream sector to foreign drillers and last month rolled out plans to spin off the nation’s pipelines into a new firm to allow more companies access to energy infrastructure.Dai Houliang, chairman of refining giant Sinopec Group, is set to be named the new chairman and party secretary of the country’s biggest oil firm, China National Petroleum Corp., according to people familiar with the matter. Wang Yilin, the current CNPC chairman, is set to step down and retire, they added.The top job in Sinopec Group, formally known as China Petrochemical Corp., will be taken by Zhang Yuzhuo, former chairman of coal colossus China Shenhua Energy Co., said the people who asked not to be identified as the information is private.Li Fanrong, deputy director of China’s National Energy Administration and former CEO of CNOOC Ltd., will be named as general manager of CNPC, said the people. Zhang Wei, current general manager at CNPC, will be appointed chairman of the newly-established national oil and gas pipeline company.The decision by China’s central government is set to be announced as early as this week. Nobody responded to emails or calls sent to CNPC and Sinopec’s press offices.State Grid Corp., China’s largest operator of electric networks, also named a new top executive, putting Mao Weiming in place as chairman and party chief.‘Major Change’CNPC is the nation’s largest driller and natural gas importer, and is the parent of PetroChina Co., while Sinopec Group is the world’s largest oil refiner by capacity and parent of China Petroleum & Chemical Corp. The appointment of the new CNPC executives will be especially positive for PetroChina, according to analysts at Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. including Neil Beveridge in a note to clients. Dai could help shape up the company’s struggling refining and petrochemical division, while Li’s stint at Cnooc proved him “one of the highest caliber CEOs within China’s oil and gas industry over the past decade.”“We view his appointment as a strong sign that significant reform could take place within the PetroChina which is undergoing major change with pipeline reform,” Beveridge said.Even as PetroChina and Sinopec have raised spending to boost output -- heeding calls from President Xi Jinping to bolster the nation’s energy security -- the country has become more dependent on foreign supplies.China’s dependence on overseas oil has grown from less than 50% in 2005 to nearly 75% by the end of last year as more than two decades of super-charged growth have made it the world’s biggest importer. China also became the world’s biggest natural gas importer in 2018, overtaking Japan after a government push for cleaner energy caused demand to surge.(Updates with analyst comments in 8th, 9th paragraphs.)\--With assistance from Dan Murtaugh.To contact the reporter on this story: Alfred Cang in Singapore at acang@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Serene Cheong at scheong20@bloomberg.net, Dan MurtaughFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • What Does CNOOC's 2020 Capex & Production Guidance Tell Us?
    Zacks

    What Does CNOOC's 2020 Capex & Production Guidance Tell Us?

    CNOOC's (CEO) total capital expenditures for 2020 are projected in the range of RMB 85-RMB 95 billion.

  • China Opens Up to Oil Majors at the Wrong Time
    Bloomberg

    China Opens Up to Oil Majors at the Wrong Time

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Broad new horizons in key markets are opening for the world’s energy companies. Don’t expect to see a land rush any time soon. China will allow all large domestic and foreign companies to apply for oil and gas exploration licenses that were previously only open to state-owned enterprises, the country’s resources ministry said at a briefing Thursday. In India, regulators will also let private and international companies bid for a group of coal blocks it’s putting up for auction starting this month, the country’s coal and mines minister Pralhad Joshi said this week, chipping away at a near-monopoly enjoyed by state-controlled Coal India Ltd.A decade or so ago, such announcements might have caused international energy companies to salivate with excitement. All the fear back then was that state-owned giants like Saudi Arabian Oil Co. and Petroleos de Venezuela SA controlled all the viable assets to fuel a coming era of ever-increasing fossil fuel demand, leaving listed businesses running out of reserves. How things have changed.For one thing, it’s national governments rather than independent companies that are now worried about supply shortages. China’s domestic oil production has fallen about 10% since peaking five years ago. India’s coal output is still edging up, but not fast enough to meet demand: Net imports have accounted for about a quarter of consumption in recent years, up from 10% a decade ago.Meanwhile, energy companies are awash with supply. The revolution in fracking means that America’s shale patch would count as one of the world’s top three oil producers if considered on its own. It briefly overtook Saudi Arabia for the number two spot behind Russia after an attack on the Gulf country’s oil facilities in September.Conventional oil and gas discoveries are booming, too, hitting a four-year high of 12.2 billion barrels of oil equivalent last year, according to consultancy Rystad Energy AS. Storied oil majors Exxon Mobil Corp., Total SA, BP Plc and Eni SpA chalked up some of the year’s best discoveries. On the demand side, consumption of petroleum may peak as soon as a decade from now, well within the lifetime of most conventional oilfields.As a result, the interests of fossil fuel producers and the energy-hungry governments seeking to attract them are fundamentally opposed. Beijing and New Delhi ultimately want to boost domestic output at all costs, and hope that foreign businesses can sprinkle some innovative magic that local giants can’t muster. International oil companies, on the other hand, are ruing a decade when they chased barrels to the exclusion of all else. They’re now much more focused on developing only the most profitable fields, wherever they’re to be found.It’s probably unfair to characterize the state-owned Chinese and Indian companies as lazy behemoths, too. PetroChina Co.’s capital spending is bigger than that of Exxon Mobil and BP put together, and about half the wells it drills each year are in the Changqing field, where most new development is in difficult formations similar to those in the U.S. shale patch. Coal India, likewise, is hampered by the fact that most of the country’s coal is high in ash and low in energy, and dependent on a creaky rail network to make it to power stations.The problem, instead, is that the remorseless facts of poor geology make it nearly impossible to develop domestic reserves profitably, especially when government targets are driving state-owned companies to increase output with little regard for cost.Take the Qingcheng field, a corner of the Changqing deposit that counts as PetroChina’s largest single shale find. Even after recent efforts to drive down costs, the internal rate of return for Qingcheng wells is now only 8% to 9%, Cathy Chan, an analyst at CCB International Holdings Ltd., wrote in an October note.It’s fanciful to think this would tempt foreign investors. Such returns barely cover PetroChina’s own cost of capital. In Texas’s Permian basin, comparably low returns were last seen in early 2016, when the local fracking industry was on the brink of collapse. IRRs of 20% to 40% are typical for unconventional petroleum in the U.S. Given the substantial political risks that come from operating in China these days, it’s very hard to see the attraction here for international energy businesses.The best path to energy security for China and India is to encourage their own renewable energy and electrified transport industries — an approach that will improve the health of their populations, reduce climate risks, and leave them far less dependent on imported fuels. That’s a much better idea than wasting money trying to get blood from a stone, or hoping that clever foreigners will be able to find hidden deposits where local talent has failed.To contact the author of this story: David Fickling at dfickling@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Rachel Rosenthal at rrosenthal21@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.David Fickling is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities, as well as industrial and consumer companies. He has been a reporter for Bloomberg News, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and the Guardian.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • China firms stock up cleaner shipping fuel overseas ahead of new emission rules
    Reuters

    China firms stock up cleaner shipping fuel overseas ahead of new emission rules

    Chinese marine fuel suppliers have signed up short-term deals to buy very low-sulphur fuel oil from companies like oil major Shell , Germany's Uniper and U.S. commodities trader Freepoint ahead of a new standard on emissions for the global shipping industry that kicks in on Jan. 1. While China's state refiners have pledged to produce a combined 14 million tonnes of the fuel for 2020 that complies with the tighter rules set by the International Maritime Organization (IMO), Beijing has not yet rolled out much-anticipated tax breaks that will encourage refineries to ramp up domestic output of the very low-sulphur fuel oil (VLSFO). Instead, companies like Chimbusco, PetroChina and Sinopec Corp have procured supplies from the international market to cover demand up to the end-March, executives at the three firms said.

  • Oilprice.com

    China Dumps LNG Amid Massive Glut In Asia

    PetroChina, one of the largest buyers of liquefied natural gas (LNG) in the key LNG demand growth market, has offered the lowest bid in an LNG tender in Pakistan, in a sign that the Asian market continues to be oversupplied

  • Landmark Siberian gas to test CNPC's marketing mettle in China's backwaters
    Reuters

    Landmark Siberian gas to test CNPC's marketing mettle in China's backwaters

    HARBIN, China/SINGAPORE/MOSCOW (Reuters) - Across China's coal-burning northeastern provinces, pipelines are being laid, contracts signed and coal-fired boilers ripped out ahead of the arrival next week of the country's first piped natural gas from Russia. The 'Power of Siberia' pipeline, due to open on Dec. 2, will pipe natural gas around 3,000 km (1,865 miles) from Russia's Siberian fields to the fading industrial region, which has lagged the push to gas in China's south and east. The pipeline - which will deliver gas under a 30-year, $400 billion (£312 billion) deal signed in 2014 - has the potential to transform northeast China's energy landscape and even slow the country's surging imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG).

  • Oil & Gas Stock Roundup: Linde, Helmerich & Payne Earnings Top
    Zacks

    Oil & Gas Stock Roundup: Linde, Helmerich & Payne Earnings Top

    Linde plc (LIN) and Helmerich & Payne Inc. (HP) reported better-than-expected September quarter earnings.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alphabet, Amazon, Johnson & Johnson, Boeing and PetroChina
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alphabet, Amazon, Johnson & Johnson, Boeing and PetroChina

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alphabet, Amazon, Johnson & Johnson, Boeing and PetroChina

  • Top Analyst Reports for Alphabet, Amazon & Johnson & Johnson
    Zacks

    Top Analyst Reports for Alphabet, Amazon & Johnson & Johnson

    Top Analyst Reports for Alphabet, Amazon & Johnson & Johnson

  • PetroChina (PTR) Q3 Earnings Miss Despite Upstream Strength
    Zacks

    PetroChina (PTR) Q3 Earnings Miss Despite Upstream Strength

    Higher oil and gas production and drop in lifting costs helped PetroChina's (PTR) exploration and production unit profit surge 32.9% during the nine months ended Sep 30, 2019.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 3-UAE oil benchmark plan confused by Brent comment U-turn

    A United Arab Emirates plan to launch its own global oil benchmark was thrown into confusion on Tuesday after comments made by its own national oil company. ADNOC first said it sees Murban as a contract to replace the global Brent benchmark, only to retract the comment.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 4-Oil majors partner in new exchange listing ADNOC's Murban crude -ICE

    Intercontinental Exchange Inc said on Monday that oil majors including BP, Total and Shell would be partners in a new exchange it is launching in the United Arab Emirates next year to list Abu Dhabi National Oil Co's (ADNOC) flagship Murban crude grade. The Murban futures contract, to be hosted on the new ICE Futures Abu Dhabi (IFAD), would replace retroactive pricing, allowing buyers to hedge risks and capture more value from ADNOC's oil output, CEO Sultan al-Jaber told an energy forum in the United Arab Emirates capital Abu Dhabi.

  • This Trade Rally Is One Tweet Away From a Crash
    Bloomberg

    This Trade Rally Is One Tweet Away From a Crash

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Everything is awesome in financial markets. The sense that a trade deal may finally be on the cards sent stocks and crude soaring in the U.S. Thursday, while flight-to-safety trades such as bonds and gold slumped. Both sides seem to be moving toward a phase one agreement that would involve jointly reducing tariffs in return for vaguer concessions on the underlying issues.“If there’s a phase one trade deal, there are going to be tariff agreements and concessions,” White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow told Bloomberg.“If China, U.S. reach a phase-one deal, both sides should roll back existing additional tariffs,” China’s Ministry of Commerce spokesman Gao Feng said earlier.There’s a laconic warning buried inside both of those statements: “If.”It’s certainly possible that President Donald Trump is tiring of the trade war and as desperate to get an agreement on the table as Beijing seems to think. But the current febrile atmosphere appears to have left the fundamentals of this dispute behind. A single tweet from @realdonaldtrump could be enough to puncture the party mood.Consider some of the things you might expect to be seeing if a significant agreement was really in the works. China is well aware of the importance of the bilateral trade deficit in Washington, and one of the most promising areas for any agreement is to sharply increase imports of American agricultural and mineral products.Yet China's biggest oil producer, state-owned PetroChina Co., is behaving as if the opposite plan is underway. In results last week, the company reported its trailing 12-month capital spending rose to the highest level since 2014, thanks to a government push to lessen China’s dependence on imported fuel.PetroChina’s returns on invested capital are already the worst of the oil majors, and pressure to extract more oil and gas from China’s unpromising geology will make that situation worse. A country that was serious about balancing out the trade relationship with the U.S. and making the most productive use of state companies’ cash would be looking for ways to tap America’s energy boom instead.It’s a similar case with agriculture. China could increase its imports of poultry, beef, pork and other products by as much as $53 billion just by removing current constraints on trade, according to a study last year by Minghao Li, Wendong Zhang and Dermot Hayes of Iowa State University.If anything, that’s probably low-balling it: You could add $10 billion to the total just by taking soybean imports back to where they were before the current round of trade tensions cut that trade close to zero. One only needs to look at China’s trade data released Friday to see that the opposite is happening. The surplus with the U.S. may be narrowing, but on a global, trailing 12-month basis it was the widest it’s been since May 2017. Part of that is simply the weakness of domestic demand. But hosting jazzy import conferences won’t change the fact that President Xi Jinping’s praise of zili gengsheng, or self-reliance, is just as pointed a retreat from trade as Trump’s “Make America Great Again” mantra.All this comes before even touching on issues around intellectual property, technology transfer and state involvement in the economy, which were ostensibly the reasons for this trade war in the first place. China continues to make quiet progress on the first front as if the trade war wasn’t happening; and formal technology transfer is shrinking, too, although stories of outright industrial espionage abound. On the third point, the Chinese state is, if anything, becoming an even more dominant economic actor than it was hitherto.What about this backdrop makes a deal seem so imminent? Beijing appears unlikely to make the sorts of concessions on the main issues under contention that would allow Trump to present an agreement as a personal victory. Trump, for his part, is presiding over a stock market that — thanks in part to all the optimism about a trade deal — hits fresh records every day, giving him no incentive to sign on to a deal that looks like a climb-down.Right now, markets are behaving as if the whole structure of trade impediments built up over the past two years could start getting dismantled within weeks. It’s quite as likely that, in the white heat of a breakdown, the levies suspended last month are reinstated, only to be followed by the final round still due to kick in Dec. 15. Should that come about, the current exuberance could turn into a hangover awfully quick.To contact the author of this story: David Fickling at dfickling@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Rachel Rosenthal at rrosenthal21@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.David Fickling is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities, as well as industrial and consumer companies. He has been a reporter for Bloomberg News, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and the Guardian.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • China gas demand to surge through 2035, coal to still offer stiff rivalry - PetroChina
    Reuters

    China gas demand to surge through 2035, coal to still offer stiff rivalry - PetroChina

    China's natural gas demand is expected to rise by more than 300 billion cubic metres (bcm) between 2018 and 2035, or 30% of global volume growth, stoked by the country's push to shift to the cleaner fuel from coal, a senior executive of PetroChina said on Wednesday. "It's slightly cheaper than central Asian gas but PetroChina will still be making a loss as it (the price) exceeds that of domestic city-gate benchmark rates," Ling told Reuters, speaking separately on the sidelines of the Singapore International Energy Week.

  • Oilprice.com

    Is China Caving To U.S. Oil Sanctions?

    China’s imports of Venezuelan oil have fallen to a nine-year low as major Chinese oil companies scramble to avoid fallout from tightening U.S. sanctions

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Facebook, UnitedHealth, HSBC, PetroChina and Netflix
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Facebook, UnitedHealth, HSBC, PetroChina and Netflix

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Facebook, UnitedHealth, HSBC, PetroChina and Netflix

  • Top Analyst Reports for Facebook, UnitedHealth & HSBC
    Zacks

    Top Analyst Reports for Facebook, UnitedHealth & HSBC

    Top Analyst Reports for Facebook, UnitedHealth & HSBC

  • False Optimism In Oil Won’t Last
    Oilprice.com

    False Optimism In Oil Won’t Last

    News that U.S. production fell in July has counteracted trade war fears, but it is highly likely that July’s dip in production was due to hurricane outages

  • Oilprice.com

    Chinese Oil Giant Significantly Boosts Shale Reserves

    State-owned energy giant PetroChina significantly boosted its shale oil and gas reserves in the Sichuan province

  • PetroChina Discovers Shale Gas Reserves in the Sichuan Basin
    Zacks

    PetroChina Discovers Shale Gas Reserves in the Sichuan Basin

    PetroChina (PTR) aims to extract 7.7 billion cubic meters of shale gas in 2019 while expanding the total output to nearly 10 billion cubic meters by this year-end.

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