PTR Sep 2020 45.000 call

OPR - OPR Delayed price. Currency in USD
0.3000
0.0000 (0.00%)
As of 2:03PM EDT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close0.3000
Open0.3000
Bid0.0000
Ask0.0000
Strike45.00
Expiry date2020-09-18
Day's range0.3000 - 0.3000
Contract rangeN/A
Volume10
Open interest367
  • Hong Kong Brokers Are Already Reading From Beijing’s Script
    Bloomberg

    Hong Kong Brokers Are Already Reading From Beijing’s Script

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The national security law China imposed on Hong Kong this week will damage civil liberties with long jail sentences and grant  immunity to Chinese agents working in the territory. For investors who depend on the city as a financial center, though, there may be an extra sting in the tail.The law could increase self-censorship by Hong Kong’s analysts and economists, and damage the credibility of research reports, the Financial Times reported this week. The need to maintain relationships with mainland clients has influenced coverage in the past, but many fear the new law will exacerbate this trend.It’s a bit late to be worrying about that, though. Self-censorship isn’t just a matter of avoiding gratuitous digs and glib phrases. If you look at the ratings given by equity analysts in recent years, it seems to include portraying companies with strong mainland connections as better investments than they actually are.Take the 50 companies on the Hang Seng Index. You can easily break them into three groups: 15 Chinese state-owned enterprises, or SOEs, such as Bank of China Ltd. and PetroChina Ltd.; 13 civilian-controlled mainland Chinese businesses, or COEs, such as Tencent Ltd. and Sino Biopharmaceutical Ltd.; and 22 other, mostly locally controlled stocks, such as HSBC Holdings Plc, CK Hutchison Holdings Ltd. and AIA Group Ltd(1). Then look at the extent to which analysts’ consensus target prices have exceeded actual stock prices in recent years. SOEs get the most favorable treatment, with target prices exceeding actual prices by an average of 24% since the start of 2016, compared to 16% for the COEs and 13% for non-mainland companies.It’s not just in Hong Kong that brokers’ target prices tend to run higher than the actual market — there’s a reason they’re called sell-side analysts. China is still an emerging market, too, so it’s not impossible that its stocks simply have more upside than those operating out of a mature economy such as Hong Kong. So perhaps the reason state-owned enterprises get a target price premium over local companies is simply that they’re better investments that will deliver higher returns to investors?If only. Thanks to booming tech and biotech stocks and the huge run-up in prices during 2017, civilian-owned Chinese companies did achieve pretty stunning average total returns of 31% over the past four-and-a-half years. SOEs, however, averaged a measly 1.9%, far less than the 6.1% achieved by the non-mainland stocks.It’s not totally irrational that possessing a wealthy patron should be seen as an advantage for some investments. The Chinese state tends to put its thumb heavily on the scales in favor of its own organs, with diminishing benefits the further you get from the commanding heights of the economy, as my colleague Shuli Ren has written.In particular, it’s logical for credit analysts to give state-owned enterprises a better rating than those that can’t count on the backing of the Chinese government to bail them out. Even there, you’ve not been paying attention if you think the interests of private bondholders are going to be treated equally with those of better-connected investors.Still, when looking at the equity market, the proof should be in the pudding. If analysts predict a stock will consistently outperform — as they tend to do in relation to SOEs — then it should do that. If not, they’re either bad at their jobs or misleading their clients.There are many things to worry about in Hong Kong’s new national security law. The integrity of equity research is probably not one of them. Sell-side brokers themselves gave that away long ago.(1) We've equal-weighted each of these baskets of stocks so that a few stocks with huge market caps like Tencent, HSBC or China Construction Bank don't skew the overall result.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.David Fickling is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities, as well as industrial and consumer companies. He has been a reporter for Bloomberg News, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and the Guardian.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Saudi Aramco's Dividend Math Doesn't Add Up
    Bloomberg

    Saudi Aramco's Dividend Math Doesn't Add Up

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- It’s the mother of all payouts.The $75 billion that Saudi Aramco doles out in dividends every year dwarfs what any other listed company gives to shareholders. It’s roughly equivalent to the payouts from Exxon Mobil Corp., Royal Dutch Shell Plc, Chevron Corp., BP Plc, Total SA, PetroChina Co., Eni SpA, Petroleo Brasiliero SA and China Petroleum & Chemical Corp. or Sinopec — put together.That makes Chief Executive Officer Amin Nasser’s promise to continue that level of returns for the next five years an extraordinary vote of confidence in an oil market awash with uncertainties. Saudi Aramco will be prepared to borrow money to ensure that it meets its commitment this year despite oil prices heading into negative territory, he said this month.Running up debts to keep the dividend on track is standard practice for energy companies amid the carnage of 2020’s oil market — except for those, like Shell, which plan to cut payouts altogether. You only want to fund dividends out of borrowings, though, if you’re certain it’ll be a strictly temporary measure. The risk for Aramco is that upholding such a long-term promise to shareholders will bend its entire business out of shape, just when it needs to be especially nimble as crude demand slows and goes into reverse. The core of Aramco’s profitability is its astonishingly low production costs, with operating expenses amounting to not much more than $8 a barrel of oil and equivalent products last year. It’s remarkable how quickly the spending adds up, though. Royalties paid to the Saudi state alone added another $10 a barrel or so, while corporate income tax came to around $19 a barrel and dividends swallowed a further $15. Once all those tolls were paid, Aramco didn’t have a lot of spare change left out of $60-a-barrel oil, let alone the stuff in the $40-a-barrel range it’s selling at the moment.A firm dividend policy is an unusually inflexible cost. Unlike the royalties and income taxes levied as a percentage of Aramco’s revenues and profits, payouts don’t automatically shrink if the price of crude declines. If anything, the burden per barrel rises further when prices and output fall. Perhaps in recognition of this, the Saudi state has from the start agreed to forgo its portion of any payouts to the extent that receiving them would get in the way of Umm-and-Abu investors getting their share(1). That may help maintain a theoretical $75 billion-a-year payout but it makes a nonsense of the idea that all shareholders are equal, not to mention the principle that a dividend policy is some sort of a commitment to future earnings. It’s not clear, either, why a company with this get-out clause would want to take on debt to meet its promised payments, although Aramco’s borrowing costs are essentially identical to those of the Saudi state.Dividends aren’t the end of Aramco’s committed spending. Its purchase of a majority stake in chemicals company Saudi Basic Industries Corp., or Sabic, was completed this month, committing it to about $69 billion of payments over the next six years — even after a restructured plan pushed the bulk of the cash outflow toward the middle of the decade.Then there’s a potential $15 billion investment in Reliance Industries Ltd.’s Jamnagar refinery in India, $20 billion on a separate planned chemicals venture with Sabic, plus Sabic’s own $5 billion a year or so of capital spending which will now sit on Aramco’s balance sheet.Add it all up and the picture is troubling. It’s likely to be several years before operating cash flows rise above $100 billion a year again, even with Sabic’s business consolidated. If Aramco wants to spend three-quarters of that sum on its dividend while laying out $10 billion to $15 billion annually for Sabic’s finance and investment costs, then capex on its core operations will have to fall to a third or less of the $35 billion-odd that the company was spending until recently. For all that executives are confident of their ability to increase production at very low costs, that sort of belt-tightening would make the easiest route to higher profits — lifting crude output from its pre-Covid 10 million daily barrels to around 13 million — extraordinarily difficult to achieve.That path is likely to be constrained, anyway, by several years of weak demand growth as the world recovers from Covid-19. Not to mention the fact that Aramco’s importance to the oil market rests on the proposition that increases in its output, coordinated via OPEC+, should make prices move in the opposite direction, resulting in little by way of net revenue gains for the company.Unlike most of its competitors, Saudi Aramco doesn’t really need to be so focused on dividends. All but 1.5% of its shares are held by the same state that’s hoovering up royalty and tax payments further up the income statement. Riyadh shouldn’t really care how it’s getting paid, as long as it’s getting paid.That dividend policy looks more like a swaggering attempt to hold back the tide of an oil market on the edge of terminal decline. The quicker Aramco acknowledges that, the better equipped it will be to handle the coming turmoil.(1) Americans would call them "Mom-and-Pop shareholders."This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.David Fickling is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities, as well as industrial and consumer companies. He has been a reporter for Bloomberg News, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and the Guardian.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Oilprice.com

    China’s Oil Giants Are Reeling From The Price Crash

    The oil price crash has weighed on the entire sector, but China’s national oil companies are seeing short-term suffering that could lead to long-term gains

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alibaba, UnitedHealth, Merck, PetroChina and 3M
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alibaba, UnitedHealth, Merck, PetroChina and 3M

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alibaba, UnitedHealth, Merck, PetroChina and 3M

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: NVIDIA, Coca-Cola, PetroChina, CVS Health and Zoom Video Communications
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: NVIDIA, Coca-Cola, PetroChina, CVS Health and Zoom Video Communications

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: NVIDIA, Coca-Cola, PetroChina, CVS Health and Zoom Video Communications

  • Q1 Scorecard and Research Reports for NVIDIA, Coca-Cola, PetroChina & Others
    Zacks

    Q1 Scorecard and Research Reports for NVIDIA, Coca-Cola, PetroChina & Others

    Q1 Scorecard and Research Reports for NVIDIA, Coca-Cola, PetroChina & Others

  • China's top energy firms to grow gas output despite spending cuts
    Reuters

    China's top energy firms to grow gas output despite spending cuts

    China's top energy producers will grow their natural gas output this year by twice as much as in the previous oil rout even as they slash spending due to collapsing oil prices, company officials and analysts said. The world's top energy consumer is forecast to expand its natural gas production by 5% or more in 2020 despite plans for deep spending cuts which will likely curb local oil production, they said. China's state-owned energy companies are joining others worldwide in slashing expenditure after this year's 56% drop in oil prices as a global pandemic ravaged economic activity.

  • PetroChina (PTR) Incurs Q1 Loss on Downstream Weakness
    Zacks

    PetroChina (PTR) Incurs Q1 Loss on Downstream Weakness

    PetroChina's (PTR) downstream segment was weighed down by depressed domestic product demand, lower refined products sales and drop in prices.

  • China's Sinopec in talks to buy stake in Hin Leong's Singapore terminal - sources
    Reuters

    China's Sinopec in talks to buy stake in Hin Leong's Singapore terminal - sources

    Chinese state energy company Sinopec is in early-stage talks with Hin Leong Trading Pte Ltd to buy a stake in an oil storage terminal that is partly owned by the Singapore trader, according to three sources with knowledge of the matter. The sale could provide much needed cash for family-owned Hin Leong, one of Asia's biggest independent traders. The company owes a total of $3.85 billion to 23 banks and has applied to a Singapore court to delay its debt repayments, according to a Hin Leong presentation to lenders on April 14 contained in the court filing, which was reviewed by Reuters but has not been made public.

  • Reuters

    PetroChina's Tarim unit spots fracture zone with over 200 mln T oil reserves

    PetroChina's <601857.SS><0857.HK> Tarim unit had discovered a new fracture zone with petroleum reserves of 228 million tonnes, China's official Xinhua news agency cited the company's general manager as saying. "This is a major breakthrough after we conquered the impact of the coronavirus," said PetroChina, adding that its Tarim unit had fully resumed production. The company based in northwestern China pumped out 624 cubic metres of crude oil per day and 371,000 cubic metres of natural gas after production testing on Wednesday, PetroChina said in a statement on its website.

  • Even China’s Big Oil Is Cutting Back
    Bloomberg

    Even China’s Big Oil Is Cutting Back

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Under the watchful eye of Beijing’s energy hawks, China’s oil and gas majors have splurged for more than a decade, first on deals abroad and then drilling at home. Yet with crude prices at less than half where they were at the start of the year and demand battered by a coronavirus epidemic, they’re preparing to cut back.Cnooc Ltd. signaled Wednesday it might reduce its 2020 capital expenditure budget, which was set at as much as $13 billion, the highest since 2014. PetroChina Ltd., the country’s largest oil producer with a market value of $117 billion, suggested Thursday that it would do the same. Given the delicate politics involved, it’s a welcome hint of rational frugality.Energy security has always been a top concern for China’s leadership. Overseas deals peaked at $28 billion in 2012, the year Cnooc bid for Canada’s Nexen. Local production growth has been less exuberant, and China has been importing ever more. As trade tensions with Washington rose in 2018, President Xi Jinping urged the country’s state-owned titans to drill. That set off a frenzy from deepwater fields in the South China Sea to shale gas in Sichuan, where China Petroleum & Chemical Corp., known as Sinopec, has led. Performing national service is fine when oil is at $60 a barrel, even if the improvements are unimpressive compared to the capital spent. It’s a different matter when West Texas Intermediate is just coming off an 18-year low of less than $20. That’s a price at which no one can make money — not even Cnooc, with an all-in production cost of less than $30 per barrel of oil equivalent. Cnooc’s adventures in U.S. onshore and Canadian oil sands look terrible; its buccaneering domestic ventures are little better.Overseas, oil majors from Chevron Corp. to Saudi Aramco are cutting spending to preserve capital. Dividends are precarious. Logic dictates that China’s producers, even with healthier balance sheets, will follow the same pattern. The question is whether they can put financial logic ahead of political necessity. So far, the message is cautious: Cnooc executives pointed out that 2020 spending targets were drawn up when oil was at $65, so adjustments would be made. It gave no specifics. PetroChina, meanwhile, didn’t disclose precise targets for the year. That’s no accident, given a volatile market. After a string of personnel changes, there are new bosses across the industry. Political priorities haven’t been set in stone, given the delay in the annual National People’s Congress meeting. Still, the official message has been clear: Life is returning to normal after a devastating shutdown. Announcing a drastic spending cut, or anything that might hint at job losses or a weak economy, simply isn’t on the cards. PetroChina employed 476,000 at the end of 2018.That doesn’t mean that there won’t be mild cuts followed by steeper ones later in the year, a pattern seen before.How steep? Unlike during the last price crunch, in 2014 and 2015, the forward curve suggests prices will remain low, with little prospect for a quick solution to the Russia-Saudi spat that has worsened a global supply glut. Demand, meanwhile, is in the doldrums. China’s economy, and therefore its own appetite for oil and gas, is recovering only slowly, and the rest of the world is ailing as more lockdowns, factory closures and travel restrictions are imposed to limit the spread of the coronavirus. Analysts at UBS Group AG forecast Cnooc’s capex could come down 25% over the next two years, a cut that could be far deeper if oil averages closer to $30 this year. Overall, they project Chinese state-owned oil producers could cut spending by over a third, dragging production down 8% to 9%. Exploration budgets may be trimmed, though domestic production — where job preservation remains key — will mostly be spared. That leaves refining and other downstream activities, plus projects abroad, to bear the brunt. Low energy prices aren’t all bad for China, which imports more than 70% of the crude it consumes. Even liberalization of the domestic gas market becomes easier when prices are low enough for consumers to cope with change, Michal Meidan of the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies points out. Cheaper oil could eventually stimulate demand. For now, a little less drilling all round. This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Clara Ferreira Marques is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities and environmental, social and governance issues. Previously, she was an associate editor for Reuters Breakingviews, and editor and correspondent for Reuters in Singapore, India, the U.K., Italy and Russia.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Selloff: PetroChina, Saudi Aramco coincidence

    You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@thomsonreuters.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@thomsonreuters.com) and Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@thomsonreuters.com) in London. Did you know the market top before the 2008 financial crisis came around PetroChina's IPO and the market top this time around was preceded by Saudi Aramco's IPO. Another one here, both companies were the world's largest listed oil companies at the time of the listing.

  • Asian spot LNG prices edge higher as supply tightens
    Reuters

    Asian spot LNG prices edge higher as supply tightens

    Prices of Asian spot liquefied natural gas (LNG) edged up this week as supply for cargoes to be delivered in April tightened, but traders expected prices to remain low for a while as demand continued to be weak amid the coronavirus outbreak. The average LNG price for April delivery into northeast Asia is estimated at about $3.20 per million British thermal units (mmBtu), 20 cents higher from the previous week, but still near record low prices, several traders said. Prices for cargoes delivered in May are estimated to be at the same level as April, they added.

  • PetroChina suspends some gas contracts as coronavirus hits demand: sources
    Reuters

    PetroChina suspends some gas contracts as coronavirus hits demand: sources

    PetroChina <601857.SS> has suspended some natural gas imports, including on liquefied natural gas (LNG) shipments and on gas imported via pipelines, as a seasonal plunge in demand adds to the impact on consumption from the coronavirus outbreak. The company issued the force majeure notice to suppliers of piped gas and also to at least one LNG supplier, though details of the force majeure notice could not immediately be confirmed. PetroChina, China's top gas producer and piped gas supplier, did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

  • Exclusive: PetroChina suspends some gas contracts as coronavirus hits demand - sources
    Reuters

    Exclusive: PetroChina suspends some gas contracts as coronavirus hits demand - sources

    PetroChina has suspended some natural gas imports, including on liquefied natural gas (LNG) shipments and on gas imported via pipelines, as a seasonal plunge in demand adds to the impact on consumption from the coronavirus outbreak. The company issued the force majeure notice to suppliers of piped gas and also to at least one LNG supplier, though details of the force majeure notice could not immediately be confirmed. PetroChina, China's top gas producer and piped gas supplier, did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

  • Exclusive: China's top gas importer PetroChina declares force majeure on imports - sources
    Reuters

    Exclusive: China's top gas importer PetroChina declares force majeure on imports - sources

    China's top gas importer PetroChina <601857.SS> has declared force majeure on natural gas imports, including on liquefied natural gas (LNG) shipments and on gas imported via pipelines, following the coronavirus outbreak, four industry sources told Reuters. The company issued the force majeure notice to suppliers of piped gas and also to at least one LNG supplier, though details of the force majeure notice could not immediately be confirmed. PetroChina did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

  • Reuters

    RPT-China's Unipec snaps up over 6 mln bbls of gasoil in Feb - data

    China's Unipec, an arm of Asia's top refiner Sinopec snapped up the lion's share of gasoil cargoes traded in Singapore this month, despite weaker domestic demand amid a coronavirus epidemic, according to trade data and industry sources. Unipec has bought about 6.4 million barrels of gasoil with a sulphur content of 10 parts per million (ppm) during the Platts Market on Close (MoC) process in Singapore this month, or 77.5% of the total volume of 8.3 million barrels traded in February, the data showed. Unipec bought the majority of these cargoes from PetroChina and Trafigura, starting at cash premiums of as high as $1 a barrel to Singapore quotes near the beginning of this month, down to the most recent purchase at a 20-cent premium on Tuesday.

  • Reuters

    China's Unipec snaps up over 6 mln bbls of gasoil in Feb - data

    China's Unipec, an arm of Asia's top refiner Sinopec snapped up the lion's share of gasoil cargoes traded in Singapore this month, despite weaker domestic demand amid a coronavirus epidemic, according to trade data and industry sources. Unipec has bought about 6.4 million barrels of gasoil with a sulphur content of 10 parts per million (ppm) during the Platts Market on Close (MoC) process in Singapore this month, or 77.5% of the total volume of 8.3 million barrels traded in February, the data showed. Unipec bought the majority of these cargoes from PetroChina and Trafigura, starting at cash premiums of as high as $1 a barrel to Singapore quotes near the beginning of this month, down to the most recent purchase at a 20-cent premium on Tuesday.

  • Bloomberg

    R.I.P. HNA, and the $143 Billion Empire You Built

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The house of HNA Group Co. may be no more, bringing an end to the dramatic rise and fall of one of the biggest buyers of global assets in recent years. It was about time.The Chinese government is planning to take over the airline-to-insurance-to-property conglomerate that splashed out over $40 billion in recent years to buy assets including stakes in Hilton Worldwide Holdings Inc. and Deutsche Bank AG and airplane lessor Avolon Holdings Ltd., Bloomberg News reported citing people familiar with the plans. A government seizure would mark the final step in an unwinding of the closely held and debt-encumbered behemoth that began more than two years ago.  In theory, Beijing was already running the show behind the scenes. In early 2018, as Anbang Insurance Group Co. (another binge-buyer that scooped up assets like New York’s Waldorf Astoria Hotel) was being taken over by the Chinese government, HNA was extended over $3 billion of credit lines by large state-owned lenders to keep going. Since then, on Beijing’s directive, it has sold off assets and attempted to retreat to its core airline-related business. Despite state support, HNA has still been late to make payments on bonds and unable to effectively run the sprawling businesses it bought.An official takeover would mean ownership changes at its foreign affiliates and subsidiaries. Would Ingram Micro Inc., the Irvine, California-based electronics distributor HNA bought in 2016, effectively become a Chinese state-owned enterprise? And if it did, would the company then have to go back to the Committee on Foreign Investments in the U.S. for approval?Under its existing agreement with CFIUS, Ingram Micro is required to operate as a standalone company, and is subject to annual audits of its compliance with certain operating and security agreements, according to Moody’s Investors Service. The company’s board composition is governed by an agreement with CFIUS and the U.S. Defense Department. Another subsidiary, Swissport Group Sarl, a ground handler, serves over 300 airports and millions of metric tons of cargo through over 100 warehouses globally. HNA representatives comprise a majority of the board. If the government officially takes control of HNA, those relationships will get more complicated. Just this week, the U.S. State Department designated five Chinese state-owned media outlets as foreign missions, increasing their reporting requirements around property and personnel. Waltzing onto foreign boards or owning overseas real estate isn’t as easy for Chinese entities as it once was.It also makes sense that Beijing would act now, in the teeth of the coronavirus epidemic.There’s no doubt that with the outbreak all but halting the real economy, hard-up borrowers are coming to the fore. Analysts had long seen HNA’s indebtedness as a significant risk to the financial system. To fund the borrowing spree that fueled its risk, the company spun a complex web of debt between subsidiaries and affiliates, using its units as collateral at times to take on yet more debt.Now, Beijing is  opening the spigots and relaxing bad loan limits to encourage banks to lend more freely and keep the economy ticking over. In this emergency environment, the ongoing risk of a collapse in HNA’s enormous net debt pile — worth $69 billion at the end of June, bigger than the borrowings of PetroChina Co. or Walmart Inc. — isn’t helping. You’re less likely to extend credit to a struggling business if you think your existing loan book might turn bad.It’s never easy to undo the excess of an M&A binge, and HNA’s large and labyrinthine balance sheet has meant even its wave of selloffs has barely moved the needle. While total assets have fallen by about $46.53 billion, to $142.8 billion, since their peak at the end of 2017, net debt is actually marginally up, making it increasingly difficult for HNA to service its borrowings. Affiliates and subsidiaries like Ingram Micro and Swissport have already distanced themselves, placing clauses in debt agreements that protect their cash flows. Throughout HNA's history, operating income has only occasionally run ahead of interest payments.To the extent that management has been able to keep these plates spinning at all, it's likely to have depended heavily in recent months on the way that HNA's investments in logistics, air transport, catering and retail have given it a presence throughout the sinews of China's economy, and the world’s. The coronavirus represents a critical blow to that proposition. China's aviation market has shrunk from the world's third-biggest to 25th place because of the infection. Hotels and shopping malls are empty. Cash is barely flowing.Two years on, Beijing is still trying to shed the assets of Anbang, now renamed Dajia Insurance. Officially unwinding the House of HNA will prove a much hairier task. But China may have no other options left.To contact the authors of this story: Anjani Trivedi at atrivedi39@bloomberg.netDavid Fickling at dfickling@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Rachel Rosenthal at rrosenthal21@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Anjani Trivedi is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies in Asia. She previously worked for the Wall Street Journal. David Fickling is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities, as well as industrial and consumer companies. He has been a reporter for Bloomberg News, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and the Guardian.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Outlook for Oil & Gas Integrated International Industry Bleak
    Zacks

    Outlook for Oil & Gas Integrated International Industry Bleak

    Outlook for Oil & Gas Integrated International Industry Bleak

  • China's biggest liquefied gas importer suspends some contracts as virus spreads
    Reuters

    China's biggest liquefied gas importer suspends some contracts as virus spreads

    China National Offshore Oil Corp (CNOOC), the country's biggest importer of liquefied natural gas (LNG), has suspended contracts with at least three suppliers amid the rapid spread of the coronavirus, two sources said on Thursday. The biggest suppliers of LNG to CNOOC include Anglo-Dutch energy company Royal Dutch Shell, France's Total, Australia's Woodside Petroleum and Qatargas, industry sources said. The force majeure notice covers CNOOC's LNG purchases for February and March, one of the two sources said.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, PetroChina, Lockheed Martin, Morgan Stanley and Square
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, PetroChina, Lockheed Martin, Morgan Stanley and Square

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Apple, PetroChina, Lockheed Martin, Morgan Stanley and Square

  • Earnings Season Scorecard and Research Reports for Apple, PetroChina & Others
    Zacks

    Earnings Season Scorecard and Research Reports for Apple, PetroChina & Others

    Earnings Season Scorecard and Research Reports for Apple, PetroChina & Others

  • What Does CNOOC's 2020 Capex & Production Guidance Tell Us?
    Zacks

    What Does CNOOC's 2020 Capex & Production Guidance Tell Us?

    CNOOC's (CEO) total capital expenditures for 2020 are projected in the range of RMB 85-RMB 95 billion.

  • China firms stock up cleaner shipping fuel overseas ahead of new emission rules
    Reuters

    China firms stock up cleaner shipping fuel overseas ahead of new emission rules

    Chinese marine fuel suppliers have signed up short-term deals to buy very low-sulphur fuel oil from companies like oil major Shell <RDSa.L>, Germany's Uniper <UN01.DE> and U.S. commodities trader Freepoint ahead of a new standard on emissions for the global shipping industry that kicks in on Jan. 1. While China's state refiners have pledged to produce a combined 14 million tonnes of the fuel for 2020 that complies with the tighter rules set by the International Maritime Organization (IMO), Beijing has not yet rolled out much-anticipated tax breaks that will encourage refineries to ramp up domestic output of the very low-sulphur fuel oil (VLSFO). Instead, companies like Chimbusco, PetroChina <0857.HK> and Sinopec Corp <0386.HK> have procured supplies from the international market to cover demand up to the end-March, executives at the three firms said.

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