RDSB.L - Royal Dutch Shell plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
1,181.10
-0.10 (-0.01%)
As of 11:45AM BST. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close1,181.20
Open1,160.80
Bid1,180.60 x 0
Ask1,181.20 x 0
Day's range1,154.40 - 1,182.65
52-week range8.89 - 2,641.00
Volume2,357,059
Avg. volume9,667,478
Market cap94.341B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.85
PE ratio (TTM)9.66
EPS (TTM)122.30
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yield0.51 (4.14%)
Ex-dividend date14 May 2020
1y target est36.11
  • Is Shell Oil (RDS.A) Stock Undervalued Right Now?
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    Is Shell Oil (RDS.A) Stock Undervalued Right Now?

    Here at Zacks, our focus is on the proven Zacks Rank system, which emphasizes earnings estimates and estimate revisions to find great stocks. Nevertheless, we are always paying attention to the latest value, growth, and momentum trends to underscore strong picks.

  • Why it's Best to Hold National Fuel Gas (NFG) Stock for Now
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    National Fuel Gas' (NFG) decision to acquire Royal Dutch Shell's upstream and midstream assets in Pennsylvania is set to boost its performance.

  • Stock market crash bargains: I think this is the best UK stock to buy now
    Fool.co.uk

    Stock market crash bargains: I think this is the best UK stock to buy now

    Once the largest stock in the FTSE 100, Royal Dutch Shell has seen its share price plummet by 45% in 2020. Could it be one of the best UK stocks to buy now?The post Stock market crash bargains: I think this is the best UK stock to buy now appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Oilprice.com

    Exxon’s Big Bet On Algae Biofuels Is Crumbling

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  • Does a crashing Shell share price make it a buy?
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    Does a crashing Shell share price make it a buy?

    Fool contributor David Barnes asks if the Shell share price is now a dirt-cheap bargain or whether looks can be deceptive?The post Does a crashing Shell share price make it a buy? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Oil & Gas Stock Roundup: Shell & Exxon's Q2 Updates, BP's Divestment & More
    Zacks

    Oil & Gas Stock Roundup: Shell & Exxon's Q2 Updates, BP's Divestment & More

    Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A) and ExxonMobil (XOM) issued updates on their upcoming Q2 earnings, while BP plc (BP) agreed to sell its global petrochemicals business for $5 billion.

  • Have money to invest? I’d follow Warren Buffett to get rich
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    Have money to invest? I’d follow Warren Buffett to get rich

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  • Italy’s Eni Says Covid-19 Is Reshaping Oil Industry
    Bloomberg

    Italy’s Eni Says Covid-19 Is Reshaping Oil Industry

    (Bloomberg) -- Eni SpA became the latest oil company to cut its long-term price assumptions, saying the coronavirus pandemic would have a lasting impact on the industry.Eni now sees benchmark Brent crude at $60 a barrel in 2023 real terms, down from a previous estimate of $70, the company said late Monday, warning of impairment charges. Rivals Royal Dutch Shell Plc and BP Plc have also cut price forecasts as the lockdown-induced slump batters their business, forcing producers to reassess the value of their assets amid a shift to cleaner energy.“Having considered the prospect of the pandemic having an enduring impact on the global economy and the energy scenario, Eni has revised its view of market fundamentals,” the Rome-based producer said in a statement. The company said it would stick to -- or even speed up -- its long-term climate strategy presented in February.The spread of the coronavirus across the world this year wiped out fuel demand, hitting oil majors’ earnings in the first quarter and threatening worse to come in the second. Despite a recent rebound in consumption in some of the worst-hit countries, resurgent waves of the virus show the recovery remains fragile.Lowering price forecasts “appears to be the flavor of the month,” Biraj Borkhataria, an analyst at RBC Europe, said in a note. At Eni, “we do not see its current dividend as compatible with its aggressive decarbonization strategy.”Last month, BP signaled it would make the biggest writedown on the value of its business since the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster, as it cut estimates for oil and gas prices in the coming decades between 20% and 30%. Two weeks later, Shell also said it had revised its mid- and long-term pricing outlook, and warned of a record writedown.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Cheap shares: I think these FTSE 350 shares have huge recovery potential
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    Cheap shares: I think these FTSE 350 shares have huge recovery potential

    The March stock market crash means some shares still have huge share price recovery potential, says Andy Ross. The post Cheap shares: I think these FTSE 350 shares have huge recovery potential appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Investing.com

    Stocks - Europe Seen Lower; Consolidating as Virus Cases Grow

    European stock markets are set to open lower Tuesday, consolidating after Monday’s sharp gains, as investors try to balance signs of a global economic recovery with concerns over the increasing number of new coronavirus cases in the U.S. At 2:05 AM ET (0605 GMT), the DAX futures contract in Germany traded 0.7% lower. CAC 40 futures in France were down 0.7%, while the FTSE 100 futures contract in the U.K.fell 0.7%.

  • As Big Oil Stumbles, Total Manages to Stay on Its Feet
    Bloomberg

    As Big Oil Stumbles, Total Manages to Stay on Its Feet

    (Bloomberg) -- Europe’s oil giants came into 2020 promising shareholders they can “do it all” -- maintain generous dividends, keep the crude flowing and make a historic shift toward clean energy. Only one of them may succeed.Since the coronavirus pandemic wiped out oil demand, Royal Dutch Shell Plc shocked investors with its first dividend cut since the Second World War, while BP Plc announced 10,000 jobs cuts and the sale of its chemical business as debt soared. But Total SA has so far weathered the storm, and investors are confident Chief Executive Officer Patrick Pouyanne can avoid his rivals’ stumbles.They see the French company as an early adopter of clean energy, with multi-billion investments in solar, wind and batteries, but also a rare haven in an industry shattered by the slump in energy prices.“Total has probably the best balance sheet among the majors,” having spent its money wisely in recent years, said Laurent van Tuyckom, who manages high-dividend funds at Degroof Petercam Asset Management in Brussels. “We’re much more cautious on other heavyweights of the industry.”Total has taken steps to mitigate the effect of the downturn. It has cut costs, suspended a plan to increase its dividend by 5% to 6% per year, halted share buybacks, and given investors the option of taking the final quarterly dividend for 2019 in shares instead of cash. It also announced a plan to eliminate 1,000 jobs in France at a petrochemicals unit, and potentially more abroad.Those measures will save $7.5 billion this year, meaning the company can fund its major oil and gas projects, invest as much as $2 billion in low-carbon assets and keep paying its dividend even if oil remains at about $40 a barrel, Pouyanne has said. The payout will rise again when the economic situation has normalized, maybe from 2022, he said.Asset managers are confident Total can maintain its payout until the markets starts to recover. Most investors seem to agree, as the French company has the lowest dividend yield among its European peers, even after Shell’s two-thirds cut.Its peers are not so well placed. Eni Spa’s dividend is “more challenged than most peers at lower commodity prices,” said Biraj Borkhataria, an analyst at RBC Europe Ltd. JPMorgan said a cut to BP’s dividend is “well flagged”, particularly after Shell’s cut in April.Total can defend its dividend “even in an adverse scenario which would see the barrel staying around $40” said Regis Longlade, deputy chief executive officer of AG2R La Mondiale Gestion d’Actifs, which owns shares in Total and Shell. “It’s one of the most robust investment case in the industry. Total has one of the lowest breakevens in the market.”Total now needs less than $25 a barrel to cover its annual expenditure excluding the dividend payment, a drop of more than 75% compared to what it needed back in 2014. It is benefiting from spending cuts initiated since the previous down turn five years ago and investments in low-cost barrels. Its upstream operating expenditure has almost halved since 2014 to $5.4 a barrel, the lowest among the five supermajors, according to Total. Its gearing -- a measure of indebtedness -- has also halved.Writedown WoesYet Total may not be immune to another feature of the current downturn -- multibillion dollar asset writedowns. Last month, BP announced as much as $17.5 billion of charges, its biggest in a decade, saying it expects the pandemic to accelerate the pace of transition to a lower carbon economy. Shell soon followed, warning that it expected a writedown of $15 billion to $22 billion.“BP has made a major step forwards with its writedowns and the issue of financial risks linked with fossil energies,” said Aurelie Baudhuin, head of socially responsible investing research at Meeschaert Asset Management. “That will inevitably spill over to the entire industry one way or another.”Total should follow that example, by giving more details on its roadmap to net zero emissions, and broaden its ambitions to incorporate a worldwide scope, said Baudhuin. Bruce Duguid, head of stewardship, EOS at Federated Hermes also wants Total to follow BP, which “recently changed their management and accounting assumptions to be consistent with a Paris-aligned outlook on demand.”More Work NeededPouyanne is keeping pace with his rivals in the transition to clean energy. While Shell has set the ambition of becoming the world’s biggest power producer in 2030, Total has spent billions on electricity assets and plans to have more than 25 gigawatts of gross renewable generation capacity by 2025. It is targeting carbon neutrality for all its production and energy products used by its customers in Europe by 2050 or earlier.Total bought French battery maker Saft Groupe SA in a 950 million-euro ($1 billion) deal in 2016. It further diversified into power in 2018 with the 2-billion euro acquisition of Direct Energie SA, France’s third-largest utility. It recently announced plans to build batteries for electric vehicles in France and China, expanded in the power sector in Spain, India and Qatar, and announced its first deal in offshore wind in the North Sea.All these factors make Total one of the most attractive investments in the industry, especially since it trades at a discount to its peers, said AG2R’s Longlade.“Its low breakeven, its gearing among the lowest in the industry, and the ability of its management to adjust quickly to the crisis would justify that Total trades at a premium,” he said.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Shell CEO does not rule out moving headquarters to Britain
    Reuters

    Shell CEO does not rule out moving headquarters to Britain

    Royal Dutch Shell <RDSa.L> is not ruling out moving its headquarters from the Netherlands to Britain, the oil company's chief executive Ben van Beurden said in a Dutch newspaper interview published on Saturday. Anglo-Dutch consumer products giant Unilever <ULVR.L> <UNA.AS> said last month it plans to ditch its dual Anglo-Dutch legal structure and create a single entity in Britain. Van Beurden did not explicitly say Shell wants to move its headquarters, het Financieele Dagblad said.

  • Italian prosecutor says Eni, Shell aware of bribes in Nigeria case
    Reuters

    Italian prosecutor says Eni, Shell aware of bribes in Nigeria case

    Oil majors Eni and Royal Dutch Shell were aware that most of the money they spent to buy a Nigerian oilfield in 2011 would go in corrupt payments to politicians and officials, an Italian prosecutor said on Thursday. Italy's Eni and Shell, who deny any wrongdoing, acquired the OPL 245 offshore field in 2011 for about $1.3 billion from Malabu, a company owned by former Nigerian oil minister Dan Etete.

  • Investing.com

    Crude Oil Lower; OPEC Disputes and Virus Cases Weigh

    Oil markets slipped Friday as the resurgence of Covid-19 cases, particularly in the U.S., the largest consumer in the world, threatened the recovery of crude demand. At 7:30 AM ET (1130 GMT), U.S. crude futures traded 1.2% lower at $40.15 a barrel. The U.S. has recorded around a quarter of the almost 11 million cases worldwide, according to data from Johns Hopkins University, and the number is growing rapidly.

  • Italy prosecutor says Eni, Shell aware of bribes in Nigeria case
    Reuters

    Italy prosecutor says Eni, Shell aware of bribes in Nigeria case

    Oil majors Eni <ENI.MI> and Royal Dutch Shell <RDSa.L> were aware that most of the money they spent to buy a Nigerian oilfield in 2011 would go in corrupt payments to politicians and officials, a prosecutor said on Thursday. Italy's Eni and Shell, who deny any wrongdoing, bought the OPL 245 offshore field in 2011 for about $1.3 billion from Malabu, a company owned by former Nigerian oil minister Dan Etete.

  • 1 stock I’d buy for my ISA to help me retire early… and 1 I’d avoid for now
    Fool.co.uk

    1 stock I’d buy for my ISA to help me retire early… and 1 I’d avoid for now

    You can find good stocks to buy for your ISA due to the stock market crash, but there are some Jonathan Smith would still stay away from today.The post 1 stock I'd buy for my ISA to help me retire early… and 1 I'd avoid for now appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Coronavirus Takes a Toll on Shell Imposing $15-$22B Write-Offs
    Zacks

    Coronavirus Takes a Toll on Shell Imposing $15-$22B Write-Offs

    Shell (RDS.A) expects second-quarter LNG liquefaction volumes to shrink to 8.1-8.5 million tonnes from its prior-year quarterly output of 8.66 million tonnes.

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    Yahoo Finance

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  • Shell secures biogas supply as part low-carbon shift
    Reuters

    Shell secures biogas supply as part low-carbon shift

    Royal Dutch Shell <RDSa.L> said on Tuesday it has agreed to buy renewable gas, known as biomethane, from Denmark's Nature Energy, in what the smaller company termed the largest deal of its kind. The gas will be supplied to Europe's pipeline network from July 1. In April, Shell laid out the oil and gas sector's most extensive strategy yet to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050.

  • Oil Markets On Edge As Second Wave Hits
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    Oil Markets On Edge As Second Wave Hits

    While hopes of a global economic recovery have kept oil markets afloat, the fear of a second wave of COVID cases is threatening to send oil prices lower

  • Oil Loses Ground As Traders Take Profits Under The $40 Level
    FX Empire

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  • Shell Is Taking Up to a $22 Billion Asset Writedown
    Motley Fool

    Shell Is Taking Up to a $22 Billion Asset Writedown

    After lowering its mid- and long-term energy price outlook, the company will take post-tax impairment charges of between $15 billion and $22 billion in the second quarter.

  • Bloomberg

    Shell and BP's Debt Problems Are Getting Worse

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The pandemic has now forced both of the U.K.’s oil majors to slash the value of their assets by billions of dollars. This is more than just an accounting issue for BP Plc and Royal Dutch Shell Plc. In the real world, it makes it even harder for them to meet targets for cutting leverage — targets they were already straining to hit.Shell said on Tuesday it would take a $15 billion to $22 billion post-tax impairment charge after cutting its long-term view on oil and gas prices. BP warned earlier in June of potentially $18 billion in impairments.Whereas most non-financial companies assess leverage by comparing some measure of cash flow to net debt, BP and Shell do not. They use “gearing,” or net debt as a percentage of both net debt and equity. That equity number is the wildcard. If it suddenly falls, as happens with impairments, then gearing goes up. Shell says the impact of its impairments will push up gearing by three percentage points.Both BP and Shell are now even further away from their gearing goals. Shell aspires to about 25%. The measure rose steadily throughout 2019, and was 29% in the first quarter of 2020. BP’s gearing was last at 36%, against a target range of 20%-30%.It has always been easy to explain away or divert attention from repeated misses on these targets, as though they don’t really matter. Forthcoming disposal proceeds would bring gearing down, the companies would say. Shell could point to juicy cash returns to shareholders in dividends and buybacks. It’s hard to pay off debt when you’re doing that. On analyst calls, gearing is played down as a “noisy” number and just one among many ways of measuring leverage.But today, debt reduction is becoming important. ​​​The oil price will probably be volatile for some time, so balance sheets need a cushion. Investors have historically afforded a loftier valuation to the less highly geared U.S. oil majors. If gearing targets haven’t worked in the past, are there better ways of holding BP and Shell to account for attacking their debt piles?Shell has reduced its dividend, and analysts expect BP to follow. That will help. But it’s worth considering scrapping the existing gearing targets and starting over. One option would be to fall in with the rest of the corporate pack and measure leverage using cash flow metrics. That would be more helpful in assessing the ability to service debt. It’s probably also more in tune with how these companies manage their finances day to day.If gearing really is the best measure of leverage, then BP and Shell are going to need to set out a credible plan for getting it back down over time. Otherwise pick another type of target — one that can be met.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Hughes is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals. He previously worked for Reuters Breakingviews, as well as the Financial Times and the Independent newspaper.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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