RY4C.F - Ryanair Holdings plc

Frankfurt - Frankfurt Delayed price. Currency in EUR
14.66
+0.81 (+5.85%)
At close: 11:47AM CET
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Previous close13.85
Open13.85
Bid0.00 x 180000
Ask0.00 x 180000
Day's range13.85 - 14.85
52-week range8.48 - 14.85
Volume8,021
Avg. volume1,928
Market cap16B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.59
PE ratio (TTM)18.80
EPS (TTM)0.78
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend date2015-02-12
1y target estN/A
  • Ruling on Ryanair bid to delay COO's easyJet move set for next week
    Reuters

    Ruling on Ryanair bid to delay COO's easyJet move set for next week

    An Irish High Court judge hopes to rule next week on whether Ryanair can prevent its operations chief Peter Bellew from joining arch-rival easyJet until 2021. Ryanair has argued that Bellew possesses information of competitive value and that he is bound by a non-compete clause. Former Malaysia Airlines boss Bellew denies he is subject to the clause and plans to start working with the British airline at the start of 2020 after completing a six-month notice period.

  • Business Class Flying Is Under Attack
    Bloomberg

    Business Class Flying Is Under Attack

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Michael O’Leary of Ryanair Holdings Plc is an unlikely spokesman for how aviation can avoid killing the planet. The budget travel evangelist has delighted in disparaging “eco-warriors” and casting doubt on climate science. But as chairman of the European airline association, A4E, he’s now front and center of the effort to persuade governments not to impose new climate taxes on the industry. It’s not going well.This week the European Commission’s president Ursula von der Leyen unveiled a plan to make the continent carbon neutral by 2050. Her Green Deal is still thin on detail, but it’s already prompted plenty of criticism — from the green groups who say it doesn’t go far enough to the big polluters who fear it will harm their competitiveness, such as coal-dependent Poland and the airlines.One aim of the Green Deal is to make the price of transport “reflect the impact it has on the environment.” Accordingly, Europe will review aviation’s tax exemptions — kerosene isn’t taxed — and consider cutting the free allowances allocated to airlines under Europe’s emissions trading system.The airlines think they’re being unfairly maligned. They contribute about 2% of global emissions, a fraction of what cars and trucks produce. But unlike road transport, the aviation industry doesn’t have a convincing plan to decarbonize. Europe’s airlines are spending 170 billion euros ($189 billion) on new fuel-efficient aircraft, but these will still spew out carbon. Synthetic fuels are expensive and battery limitations mean emission-free commercial flights are years away.Aviation is typical of the trade-offs we’ll have to make to get to net-zero emissions. So far we’ve only done the easy stuff that doesn’t force people to give up much or pay more for cheap products and services. The airlines are lobbying for better air traffic management in Europe’s crowded skies, which would cut the amount of fuel used. But there’s only a certain amount of carbon we can keep emitting before things go from bad to catastrophic.The question of who will have to cut back most on their polluting raises issues around economic growth and fairness: The top 10% of most frequent fliers took more than half of all flights from England last year, while almost half the population don’t fly at all. Airlines don’t even agree among themselves about whether to punish the business lounge elite or the weekend City breakers.  IATA, the airline trade body, boasted this week that more than 4.5 billion passengers will take a flight this year as tickets become ever cheaper. The average return fare, adjusted for inflation and taxes, is almost two-thirds lower than it was 20 years ago. “Flying is freedom,” Iata’s Alexandre de Juniac intoned.But even flying fanatics are no longer convinced that its growth should be unconstrained. Over-tourism in the Mediterranean has brought this to wider attention. When the environmental impact of a business isn’t priced in, there can be such a thing as too much freedom. Ryanair makes the reasonable point that aviation taxes are a levy on the poor. Making flights more expensive will hurt those for whom 20 euros in new taxes, say, is the difference between flying and staying home. It’s fine to encourage people to take a train, but rail fares are often higher, and decent services are concentrated in richer European countries. A similar debate is raging in the car industry, where the cost of electric batteries could make small cars — often bought by the young and elderly — uneconomical.Hence the budget airline Wizz Air Holdings Plc struck a nerve with a video that calls for the business class cabins of its big legacy rivals to be banned.(2) “We think you’re doing great… harm to our planet… Are all those empty seats worth the damage they cause?” the narrator asks.Wizz is, of course, talking its own book; it doesn’t offer business class. But in a carbon-constrained world, abolishing business and first class isn’t so outlandish. Because of their ability to sell out flights and cram passengers on-board, Wizz and Ryanair are Europe’s two most efficient airlines when measured on CO2 per passenger km traveled.Naturally, the older carriers don’t see it that way. Ryanair’s promotion of tickets that cost less than 10 euros is “economically, ecologically and politically irresponsible,” according to the Lufthansa chief executive officer Carsten Spohr. KLM of the Netherlands is even encouraging consumers not to fly if they don’t have to.The airlines still hope to find a way out of the impasse. EasyJet Plc will offset the carbon produced by all its flights, for example by paying to plant trees. That will cost the airline just 25 million pounds a year, equivalent to about 26 pence per passenger or 3 pounds per ton of carbon produced. But such measures haven’t always delivered the promised benefits and have been likened to the old Catholic practice of selling indulgences. While the price of European carbon permits has risen above 20 euros a ton, that’s probably too low to really affect ticket prices or encourage the use of expensive synthetic fuels. In 2019 Ryanair paid 115 million euros for emission allowances, or less than 1 euro per passenger.(1)  The Green Deal is billed as a “growth strategy” but nobody should pretend this won’t involve hard decisions. The noisy complaints are an industry realizing its license to expand and pollute is being revoked.(1) On flights lasting less than five hours(2) If you include air passenger duty, it claims the total for environment taxes is about 4 euros per passenger.To contact the author of this story: Chris Bryant at cbryant32@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Bryant is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies. He previously worked for the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Outgoing Ryanair COO felt like 'dead man walking' - court hears
    Reuters

    Outgoing Ryanair COO felt like 'dead man walking' - court hears

    Ryanair's outgoing chief operations officer Peter Bellew considered himself a "dead man walking" after a March performance review and resigned after being ordered to work at the airline's Austrian business, he said on Thursday. Bellew was speaking in court during a case brought by Ryanair to delay him joining rival easyJet for 12 months until 2021. Ryanair has said Bellew possesses information of competitive value covered by a non-compete clause.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 2-Ryanair says European delays may mean no 737 MAX jets for next summer

    Ryanair may not receive any 737 MAX aircraft from Boeing in time for its summer season due to European delays in testing the grounded jets, Chief Executive Michael O'Leary said. O'Leary told Reuters on Tuesday that testing in Europe was running behind the U.S. schedule due to the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) wanting to be seen as independent from U.S. regulators, meaning the model was likely to remain grounded in the region until April or May.

  • Ryanair says European delays may mean no 737 MAX jets for next summer
    Reuters

    Ryanair says European delays may mean no 737 MAX jets for next summer

    Ryanair may not receive any 737 MAX aircraft from Boeing in time for its summer season due to European delays in testing the grounded jets, Chief Executive Michael O'Leary said. O'Leary told Reuters on Tuesday that testing in Europe was running behind the U.S. schedule due to the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) wanting to be seen as independent from U.S. regulators, meaning the model was likely to remain grounded in the region until April or May. Ryanair estimates the issue is costing it at least 100 million euros (£85.91 million) a year.

  • Reuters

    Irish court lifts restriction on Ryanair profit target

    An Irish court on Tuesday withdrew a ban on reporting a reference to Ryanair's profit after tax target for the airline's 2020 financial year contained in a 2018 share option scheme after the airline said the order was not needed. A lawyer representing former Ryanair Chief Operating Officer Peter Bellew last Thursday asked Chief Executive Michael O'Leary if it was accurate that a 2018 share option scheme contained a profit-after-tax target for the 12 months to March, 31 2020 of 1.75 billion euros (£1.50 billion). Ryanair, which has been forced to cut its passenger growth rate due to delays in the delivery of the Boeing 737 MAX, on Nov. 4 said it expected to post profit after tax of between 800 million and 900 million euros in its 2020 financial year.

  • £2k to invest? I’d buy these growth stocks for 2020
    Fool.co.uk

    £2k to invest? I’d buy these growth stocks for 2020

    These growth stocks could be set to take off in 2020, writes Rupert Hargreaves.

  • 20 businesses that died in the 2010s
    Yahoo Finance

    20 businesses that died in the 2010s

    Yahoo Finance takes a look back at some of the biggest corporate busts of the last decade.

  • Ryanair CEO denies accusation of bullying former operations chief
    Reuters

    Ryanair CEO denies accusation of bullying former operations chief

    Ryanair chief executive Michael O'Leary on Wednesday dismissed accusations that he bullied and forced out his former operations chief Peter Bellew, telling a court he was a highly paid professional who had failed to deliver. Bellew resigned as Ryanair Chief Operations Officer in July and the Irish low-cost carrier, Europe's largest, has asked the Irish High Court to delay his departure to arch-rival easyJet , saying he is subject to a 12-month non-compete clause. Former Malaysia Airlines boss Bellew denies he is subject to the clause and plans to start working with the British airline at the start of next year.

  • Ryanair cuts planned capacity and jobs, blames 737 MAX delays
    Reuters

    Ryanair cuts planned capacity and jobs, blames 737 MAX delays

    Low-cost airline Ryanair trimmed its passenger traffic forecast on Wednesday, saying it would cut summer capacity and an unspecified number of jobs as a result of further delays in returning Boeing's grounded 737 Max aircraft to service. Ryanair has scrapped planned summer operations from bases in Nuremberg and Stockholm Skavsta, as well as some flights from other bases, "solely due to delivery delays" to MAX jets on order from Boeing, the company said in a statement. "We are continuing to work with Boeing, our people, our unions and our affected airports to minimise these capacity cuts and job losses," Ryanair added.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 2-Ryanair cuts planned capacity and jobs, blames 737 MAX delays

    Low-cost airline Ryanair trimmed its passenger traffic forecast on Wednesday, saying it would cut summer capacity and an unspecified number of jobs as a result of further delays in returning Boeing's grounded 737 Max aircraft to service. Ryanair has scrapped planned summer operations from bases in Nuremberg and Stockholm Skavsta, as well as some flights from other bases, "solely due to delivery delays" to MAX jets on order from Boeing, the company said in a statement. "We are continuing to work with Boeing, our people, our unions and our affected airports to minimise these capacity cuts and job losses," Ryanair added.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 2-Ryanair seeks to delay operations chief's flight to easyJet

    Ryanair launched a bid in Ireland's High Court on Tuesday to prevent operations chief Peter Bellew from joining arch-rival easyJet until 2021, saying he possessed information of immense competitive value and that he had signed a non-compete clause. Europe's biggest budget airline said in July that the former Malaysia Airlines boss, who denies that he is bound by such a clause, would step down at the end of the year.

  • Ryanair seeks to delay operations chief's flight to easyJet
    Reuters

    Ryanair seeks to delay operations chief's flight to easyJet

    Ryanair launched a bid in Ireland's High Court on Tuesday to prevent operations chief Peter Bellew from joining arch-rival easyJet until 2021, saying he possessed information of immense competitive value and that he had signed a non-compete clause. Europe's biggest budget airline said in July that the former Malaysia Airlines boss, who denies that he is bound by such a clause, would step down at the end of the year. On the opening day of the case, a lawyer representing Ryanair listed information he said the airline could not allow to be passed to its rival, including details of delays to the delivery of Boeing's grounded 737 MAX aircraft as well the terms of deals Ryanair has signed with partners.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 2-Spanish court says Ryanair's hand luggage fee is "abusive"

    A Spanish court on Wednesday ruled budget carrier Ryanair's policy of charging a fee for hand luggage was "abusive" and could no longer be levied in Spain. "This ruling will not affect Ryanair's baggage policy, either in the past or in the future, as it is an isolated case that misinterpreted our commercial freedom to determine the size of our cabin baggage," Ryanair said in a statement. When asked if it was planning to ignore the Spanish ruling or appeal it in the European Court of Justice, Ryanair declined to comment.

  • The EU Green Dream
    Bloomberg

    The EU Green Dream

    Dec.11 -- European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen will present her “Green Deal” in Brussels today aiming to turn the EU into a climate-neutral bloc within the next 30 years. Her pitch will include a timeline for various laws to be put forward between now and the end of her term affecting sectors across the economy. Bloomberg’s Maria Tadeo reports on “Bloomberg Markets: European Open.”

  • Ryanair CEO on Climate Change, Boeing Max, Brexit
    Bloomberg

    Ryanair CEO on Climate Change, Boeing Max, Brexit

    Dec.10 -- Michael O’Leary, chief executive officer at Ryanair, discusses the aviation industry’s efforts to combat climate change, expected deliveries of the Boeing Max aircraft, and his hopes for a Brexit resolution. He speaks with Bloomberg’s Vonnie Quinn on "Bloomberg Markets."

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