RYA.L - Ryanair Holdings plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in EUR
12.65
-0.23 (-1.79%)
At close: 5:05PM GMT
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Previous close12.88
Open12.64
Bid12.66 x 0
Ask12.67 x 0
Day's range12.10 - 12.79
52-week range8.39 - 16.97
Volume4,765,364
Avg. volume2,322,404
Market cap13.878B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.64
PE ratio (TTM)13.75
EPS (TTM)0.92
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend date12 Feb 2015
1y target est14.77
  • European stocks have worst day in four years on coronavirus fears
    Yahoo Finance UK

    European stocks have worst day in four years on coronavirus fears

    European stocks suffered their worst day since 2016 as coronavirus infections climbed in Italy, the eurozone’s third-largest economy.

  • Boeing discovers debris in 737 MAX fuel tanks
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    Boeing discovers debris in 737 MAX fuel tanks

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  • EU widens investigation of Spanish aid given to Ryanair and other airlines
    Reuters

    EU widens investigation of Spanish aid given to Ryanair and other airlines

    EU competition regulators on Monday widened their investigation into additional incentives granted by Spanish authorities to Ryanair and other airlines operating at two airports in Catalonia, concerned that they may have an unfair advantage. The European Commission launched an investigation in 2013 into marketing schemes offered to airlines operating at Girona-Costa Brava and Reus airports, about 120 km from Barcelona. Spanish public authorities subsequently offered the carriers additional marketing deals, which will now be included in the ongoing investigation.

  • Ryanair says it has no interest in buying Air Italy
    Reuters

    Ryanair says it has no interest in buying Air Italy

    Ryanair's chief commercial officer on Thursday denied any interest in buying Air Italy after press reports linking his group to the loss-making airline, which was put into liquidation by its owners earlier this week. Air Italy's owners Qatar Airways and regional carrier Alisarda blamed "persistent and structural market problems" for the decision to pull the plug on Tuesday. Asked about Italian press reports that Ryanair was preparing an offer, chief commercial officer David O'Brien said his group was not interested and had not been approached.

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  • Exclusive: Ryanair marketing chief Kenny Jacobs to leave company
    Reuters

    Exclusive: Ryanair marketing chief Kenny Jacobs to leave company

    Ryanair Chief Marketing Officer Kenny Jacobs, who spearheaded the airline's drive to improve customer service, is to leave his position after six years at the end of April to pursue other challenges, he told Reuters on Monday. Jacobs, who joined Ryanair at the start of 2014, was the architect of the airline's 'Always Getting Better' drive to improve customer service and was charged with overhauling the company's web site to adapt to individual customer preferences. "I will enjoy a summer off with family and then look for my next challenge," Jacobs said.

  • Ryanair Is a Polluting Airline. There's No Hiding That Fact
    Bloomberg

    Ryanair Is a Polluting Airline. There's No Hiding That Fact

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Ryanair Holdings Plc has been given a telling off by the U.K.’s advertising watchdog for making “misleading” claims about its carbon emissions. Ads claiming Ryanair is Europe’s “lowest emissions airline” must be withdrawn because the Irish carrier did not fully substantiate this and other environmental boasts, the Advertising Standards Authority found.As the climate crisis intensifies, Ryanair probably won’t be the last big company given a dressing down by regulators for “greenwashing.” Environmental considerations are increasingly directing consumer purchases and institutional investment decisions. This creates a big incentive for companies to put a positive spin on things. The huge variety and inherent complexity of some climate-related disclosures tempt businesses to focus on the flattering ones and ignore the rest. In fairness to Ryanair, its claims are based on facts. But it’s an airline, and airlines are heavy polluters, however much they tie a bow on it.The company and its outspoken boss, Michael O’Leary, certainly have form when it comes to making specious claims about the business. On past occasions the company has claimed to be “Europe’s favorite airline.” That may have been true in terms of passengers carried — it’s neck and neck with Deutsche Lufthansa AG — but Ryanair ranks last in Which Magazine’s yearly U.K. passenger satisfaction survey. O’Leary’s capacity for chutzpah is high.In some respects, the ASA’s new ruling is a bit harsh on Ryanair. Its operations are pretty efficient in terms of carbon per passenger kilometer traveled, as I’ve written before.Ryanair flights tend to be full, it doesn’t waste space on business class and its planes fly point-to-point, rather than via hubs, which saves fuel. If consumers are going to buy a product or service anyway, it’s better that they favor a company with a lower per-unit carbon footprint. Ryanair’s new practice of publishing a monthly CO2 report is commendable too. ASA’s main beef was that it hadn’t provided sufficient data to back up its claims and some information was out of date.Still, no one should shed tears on Ryanair’s behalf; its environmental messaging is still way off key. In public statements, O’Leary has repeatedly disparaged climate science. Furthermore, Ryanair’s business model of selling cheap tickets has helped transform flying from an uncommon luxury into a mass-market phenomenon, thereby worsening the industry’s emissions.In absolute terms, Ryanair’s carbon emissions aren’t the biggest among European airlines. But they’ve kept rising because Ryanair is carrying more passengers every year.It’s fine for companies to brag about and set targets for carbon efficiency, as Ryanair does. This a necessary counter-balance to reporting only on absolute emissions, which might show improvement just because a company’s sales have declined.  If their total emissions keep rising, however, corporate claims to be the “greenest” anything will ring hollow.To contact the author of this story: Chris Bryant at cbryant32@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Bryant is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies. He previously worked for the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Budget carrier Ryanair ordered to drop low-emissions ad claims
    Reuters

    Budget carrier Ryanair ordered to drop low-emissions ad claims

    LONDON/PARIS (Reuters) - Ryanair Holdings Plc publicity describing the budget carrier as a "low-CO2 emissions airline" has been deemed misleading by Britain's main advertising watchdog, which ordered its withdrawal on Wednesday. Ryanair print and broadcast adverts last September made environmental claims that were misleading and poorly substantiated and "must not appear again in their current forms", the Advertising Standards Authority ruled. Under CEO Michael O'Leary, the low-cost airline has tangled repeatedly with advertising authorities - often over discount terms and conditions - and on Wednesday struck an unabashed tone.

  • Ryanair Says Coronavirus Could Keep Europeans Closer to Home
    Bloomberg

    Ryanair Says Coronavirus Could Keep Europeans Closer to Home

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.Ryanair Holdings Plc said demand for air travel within Europe could receive an unlikely boost if the Chinese coronavirus epidemic persists, prompting people to holiday closer to home.Trends from 2003, when travelers shunned Asia after the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome outbreak, suggest consumers may begin to alter their travel habits, Ryanair Chief Financial Officer Neil Sorahan said in an interview.“People tended to stay close to home,” Sorahan told Bloomberg Television on Monday. “They holidayed in Europe as opposed to heading as far afield as Asia and elsewhere.”The coronavirus that spread from Wuhan in recent weeks has killed more than 360 people and infected 17,000. Dozens of nations and airlines are restricting travel, with almost 10,000 flights canceled through Jan. 31, according to data provider Cirium, even though the World Health Organization has so far said that such limits aren’t needed to control the advance.SARS affected 26 countries, resulting in close to 800 deaths from about 8,000 cases, according to the WHO. Fitch Group said in a note that a prolonged outbreak of the coronavirus would weigh on the tourist economy in Thailand, affecting not only Chinese demand but travel from elsewhere. As of Monday the Southeast Asian country had 19 confirmed cases, Fitch said.For Ryanair, a surge in European travel would bolster margins as it grapples with the grounding of Boeing Co.’s 737 Max jet. The discount giant reaffirmed that deliveries from a 200-strong order won’t commence until September or October, so that fuel-efficiency savings won’t be realized until late in the fiscal year starting in April.Chief Executive Officer Michael O’Leary said he expects Boeing to compensate Ryanair for lost revenue from the Max both this fiscal year and next, and that the focus will be on revising the order price. The carrier has specified a high-capacity variant that will take longer to certify than the baseline model.Ryanair has also issued proposals for the purchase of bigger Max 10 jets seating up to 230 people, O’Leary said, while adding that it may be too early for Boeing to give the matter serious consideration. He said the planemaker needs to target orders from major clients such as his own company and Southwest Airlines Co. to rein in Airbus SE’s lead in the narrow-body sector.Ryanair posted net income of 88 million euros ($98 million) for the third quarter through December from a year-ago loss, aided by last-minute sales over the Christmas holidays. Bookings are 1% up on last year, with planes 96% full, so an increase in regional travel would push up fares.Shares of Europe’s biggest low-cost carrier were trading 5.2% higher at 15.68 euros as of 1:11 p.m. in Dublin, where it is based.(Updates with CEO comments starting in seventh paragraph)To contact the reporters on this story: Siddharth Philip in London at sphilip3@bloomberg.net;Manus Cranny in London at mcranny@bloomberg.net;Nejra Cehic in London at ncehic@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Anthony Palazzo at apalazzo@bloomberg.net, Christopher Jasper, John BowkerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Ryanair Downplays Long-Term Impact of Coronavirus Outbreak
    Skift

    Ryanair Downplays Long-Term Impact of Coronavirus Outbreak

    The coronavirus outbreak continues to have a devastating effect on the Chinese travel market with tourism companies exposed to the region suffering already. But there's always a flipside. Businesses that focus elsewhere will have an easier time. Europe's largest low-cost carrier Ryanair might end up being one such beneficiary. "Longer term, we don't think the […]

  • Ryanair makes Boeing offer for new MAX order
    Reuters

    Ryanair makes Boeing offer for new MAX order

    Ryanair has submitted an offer to Boeing for a new order of its grounded 737 MAX jet but does not expect to finalise it until the plane returns to service, Chief Executive Michael O'Leary said on Monday. Ryanair made the offer for an undisclosed number of 737 MAX 10 jets, a larger model than the MAX 200 model the Irish airline currently has on order, O'Leary said on a conference call following the release of financial results for the last three months of 2019. Ryanair is one of the biggest customers of the MAX, with 210 currently on order.

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  • Ryanair warns Boeing 737 Max delays could stifle growth for two years
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Ryanair warns Boeing 737 Max delays could stifle growth for two years

    Ryanair, one of the jet’s biggest customers, said it did not expect delivery of 737 Max aircraft until September or October 2020.

  • FTSE 100 bounces back from seven-week low, Rynair advances
    Reuters

    FTSE 100 bounces back from seven-week low, Rynair advances

    On the first trading day after Britain's formal departure from the European Union, the FTSE 100 added 0.6% but the more domestically exposed FTSE 250 rose just 0.1%. Data showing an unexpected rebound in U.S. factory activity in January after five consecutive months of contraction offered some confidence to markets that have been plagued by fears of a global slowdown and the coronavirus epidemic. The FTSE 100 was also supported by exporters such as spirits company Diageo and HSBC as the pound slipped.

  • Ryanair talks tough on compensation as 737 MAX woes cloud growth target
    Reuters

    Ryanair talks tough on compensation as 737 MAX woes cloud growth target

    The "significant reputational hit" suffered by Boeing's grounded 737 MAX airliner will have to be reflected in the compensation the planemaker pays Ryanair, the CEO of Europe's biggest budget airline said on Monday. Michael O'Leary said as part of those talks he had made an offer for the larger, 230-seat MAX 10 model, but he did not expect Boeing to engage on that until the MAX returns to service. Ryanair is a top buyer with 210 on order but the grounding has forced it to effectively freeze growth this summer.

  • Ryanair backs mediator's pay plan for Irish pilots
    Reuters

    Ryanair backs mediator's pay plan for Irish pilots

    Ryanair plans to implement a new pay structure for its Irish pilots based on the recommendations of an independent mediator, the Irish airline said on Wednesday, in an effort to end one of its most intractable labour disputes. Ryanair has suffered several waves of industrial action in the past two years by pilots and cabin crew over terms and conditions, but the situation has eased in recent months after management agreed terms with several national unions. The Irish pilots union, which represents less than 10% of the airline's 5,500 pilots, is one of the most active and agreement in Ryanair's home market would mark a significant breakthrough in attempts to normalise industrial relations.

  • Ryanair warns of more job losses as 737 MAX delivery date slips
    Reuters

    Ryanair warns of more job losses as 737 MAX delivery date slips

    Ryanair has warned pilots it may have to cut more jobs and close bases because the delivery date for its first 10 Boeing 737 MAX jets has slipped into the autumn. The Irish airline had originally planned to fly 58 of the jets this summer but has gradually cut that number since the MAX was grounded after two fatal crashes and Boeing struggled to secure approval for its re-entry to service. Ryanair last July announced it had 500 more pilots more than it needed, in part due to MAX delays, but it has not announced how many jobs it has cut to date.

  • Stocks dive amid deadly virus outbreak in China
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Stocks dive amid deadly virus outbreak in China

    Airline groups and luxury goods makers have sold off sharply amid an outbreak of a deadly new strain of coronavirus in China.

  • What to Watch: Stocks rally, pound slips on retail sales, and Ladbrokes's 'excellent' performance
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  • Flybe defends bailout as Ryanair says regional airline is ‘not viable’
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Flybe defends bailout as Ryanair says regional airline is ‘not viable’

    Flybe said it had negotiated an arrangement that 'any business in financial difficulties may use.'

  • Ryanair threatens legal action against UK government over Flybe bailout
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Ryanair threatens legal action against UK government over Flybe bailout

    Michael O’Leary told chancellor Sajid Javid that the measures contained in the Flybe bailout package should be extended to other airlines.

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