RYA.L - Ryanair Holdings plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in EUR
12.75
+0.01 (+0.04%)
At close: 4:39PM BST
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Previous close12.74
Open12.65
Bid12.81 x 0
Ask12.82 x 0
Day's range12.34 - 12.84
52-week range8.05 - 16.97
Volume1,907,562
Avg. volume3,419,327
Market cap13.889B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.60
PE ratio (TTM)16.35
EPS (TTM)0.78
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend date12 Feb 2015
1y target est14.77
  • Coronavirus: Ryanair boss slams 'useless and ineffective' travel quarantine
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Coronavirus: Ryanair boss slams 'useless and ineffective' travel quarantine

    Michael O'Leary warned the 14-day rules will do 'untold damage' to firms, but the UK government warns imported cases risk a second peak of the coronavirus.

  • UK's 'useless and ineffective' quarantine will hammer tourism, Ryanair boss says
    Reuters

    UK's 'useless and ineffective' quarantine will hammer tourism, Ryanair boss says

    Britain does not have a proper plan for its 14-day international quarantine and the introduction of such a "useless and ineffective" scheme will do untold damage to the country's tourism industry, the head of Ryanair <RYA.I> said on Thursday. Britain is due to introduce a 14-day quarantine for international arrivals from June 8 to prevent a second surge in the coronavirus pandemic.

  • Wage deal struck to save jobs at Lauda pending Ryanair's OK
    Reuters

    Wage deal struck to save jobs at Lauda pending Ryanair's OK

    A collective wage agreement aimed at saving airline Lauda's Vienna base has been agreed by business and labour groups who will now need the approval of parent company Ryanair <RYA.I>. Ryanair CEO Michael O'Leary had threatened to close Lauda's main hub in the Austrian capital and instead bring in Ryanair jets unless staff agreed to a pay cut and a new labour agreement. Lauda said on Friday it was shutting down its Vienna base after failing to reach a pay agreement with the union in a move expected to involve the loss of around 370 jobs.

  • Coronavirus Woes Mar Ryanair's (RYAAY) May Traffic Results
    Zacks

    Coronavirus Woes Mar Ryanair's (RYAAY) May Traffic Results

    Ryanair (RYAAY) operates 701 scheduled flights in May including those for carrying out rescue activities and dispatching medicines to the COVID-19-affected areas.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Wingstop, Papa John's International, Ryanair, Darden Restaurants and Civeo
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Wingstop, Papa John's International, Ryanair, Darden Restaurants and Civeo

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Wingstop, Papa John's International, Ryanair, Darden Restaurants and Civeo

  • Alaska Airlines Offers Customers Mileage Plan Promotions
    Zacks

    Alaska Airlines Offers Customers Mileage Plan Promotions

    As part of Mileage Plan promotions, Alaska Air Group's (ALK) unit Alaska Airlines is extending a 50% bonus of elite qualifying miles for flights taken through the end of this year.

  • Delta (DAL) Strengthens Asia-U.S. Cargo Flight Schedule
    Zacks

    Delta (DAL) Strengthens Asia-U.S. Cargo Flight Schedule

    Delta (DAL) opens its Cargo Control Center in Atlanta to aid global cargo operations daily.

  • Delta Tries to Protect Pilots From Involuntary Furloughs
    Zacks

    Delta Tries to Protect Pilots From Involuntary Furloughs

    Delta (DAL) carries out a reshuffling process to align its staff size to future flying plans. To prevent furloughs in this regard, the carrier is working with the pilots' union.

  • Coronavirus: EasyJet to fly 75% of routes by August
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Coronavirus: EasyJet to fly 75% of routes by August

    Flights be less frequent than normal, meaning the airline will operate only around 30% of its normal capacity between July and September.

  • Ryanair must face U.S. shareholder lawsuit over unionization comments
    Reuters

    Ryanair must face U.S. shareholder lawsuit over unionization comments

    Ryanair Holdings Plc <RYA.I> and Chief Executive Michael O'Leary failed to persuade a U.S. judge to dismiss a securities fraud lawsuit accusing Europe's largest budget airline of defrauding them by downplaying its willingness to recognize labor unions. While dismissing much of the proposed class action, U.S. District Judge Paul Oetken said shareholders could try to prove that Ryanair intended to mislead them with statements indicating a "near certainty" it would not welcome unions, the recognition of which could increase costs and reduce profitability. The Manhattan judge said this included O'Leary's statement at Ryanair's September 2017 annual general meeting that hell would "freeze over" before the Dublin-based carrier accepted unions.

  • United Airlines to Cut 13 Officer Roles Amid COVID-19 Woes
    Zacks

    United Airlines to Cut 13 Officer Roles Amid COVID-19 Woes

    United Airlines'(UAL) job cuts are part of its cost-cutting measures. The carrier had earlier warned of a 30% reduction in its administrative staff.

  • Lufthansa Bailout Set to Trigger Turf War With Low-Cost Rivals
    Bloomberg

    Lufthansa Bailout Set to Trigger Turf War With Low-Cost Rivals

    (Bloomberg) -- Deutsche Lufthansa AG may have won its battle for state aid, but its surrender of airport slots to appease regulators heralds heightened conflict between European aviation’s old guard and low-cost challengers.A rivalry that’s been simmering for years has been given fresh impetus by the coronavirus crisis, with former flag carriers falling back on government support as discounters including Ryanair Holdings Plc and Wizz Air Holdings Plc argue that the market alone should dictate who survives.Lufthansa’s 9 billion-euro ($9.9 billion) bailout and a slots accord with the European Union overnight Friday handed the region’s biggest airline a lifeline. Now, the German group and network carriers such as Air France-KLM face a battle royale in repelling no-frills operators that came into the crisis stronger and plan to use it to gain ground in territories hitherto largely closed to them.“We are trying to take advantage of the situation,” Wizz Chief Executive Officer Jozsef Varadi said in an interview. “Lufthansa is getting a huge financial edge, but they’ll need to restructure after taking all of this money. So Germany will bring opportunities.”Aid ImbalanceDiscount airlines have received only modest support compared with legacy carriers. Ryanair, Wizz and EasyJet Plc have tapped the U.K.’s Covid Corporate Financing Facility for a combined 1.5 billion pounds ($1.8 billion), while Air France-KLM has received 7 billion euros from the French state and could overtake Lufthansa’s bailout once Dutch support is finalized.Low-cost carriers have also been quicker off the mark in slashing costs, with Ryanair, which has its biggest base at London Stansted, announcing 3,000 job cuts a month ago when Lufthansa was still in the early stages of putting together its bailout request.The strength of the challenge to Lufthansa in particular will depend on take-up for the 12 pairs of daily flight slots to be made available to competitors at its Frankfurt and Munich hubs as part of the bailout settlement ordered by the EU. Complicating matters is a proviso that says only new entrants can obtain the takeoff and landing rights during the first 18 months.Market DistortionThat would allow Ryanair, which has flights in Frankfurt, to target Munich, and EasyJet to do the reverse. Budapest-based Wizz, Europe’s third-biggest discount carrier, doesn’t currently serve either airport so could seek slots at both.Spokespeople for Ryanair and EasyJet declined to comment.Read more:Germany, Lufthansa Prove Tougher Foes for Vestager Than GoogleMerkel Is Seizing Her Chance to Revolutionize Germany’s EconomyWe All Might Be Flying in Planes Again Soon: Chris BryantRyanair gained 4.8% as of 11:18 a.m. in Dublin, while EasyJet advanced 4.4% and Wizz was up 3.8% in London. Lufthansa added 5.4% on Tradegate with regular trading in Frankfurt closed for a German holiday.The biggest opportunities for the low-cost players lie in Germany, Italy and Norway, said Mark Manduca, an analyst with Citigroup.“After the crisis passes and a price war this summer ensues, Ryanair and Wizz stand on the cusp of a three- to five-year consolidation and expansion story, as the participants around them shrink and flounder,” he said in a research note.State aid to the likes of Lufthansa will at least initially bend the market in their favor, EU competition watchdog Margrethe Vestager said in an interview with Bloomberg TV. “This is why we also have remedies, to try to limit that market distortion,” she said.The Lufthansa case is a template for EU oversight of other virus-related recapitalizations, Vestager said. The bloc would likely review any equity injection into Air France-KLM by France or the Netherlands, and is in close contact with the Italian government over the nationalization of bankrupt Alitalia Spa, which she called “a special case” because of its pre-existing financial distress.That budget airlines will make inroads isn’t a given.In Germany, the major hubs of Frankfurt and Munich charge typically higher fees than at the smaller airports traditional favored by discount operators, something Varadi said is a major obstacle to flying there.Both have a large proportion of passengers who transfer on or off long-distance flights, limiting the market share available to short-haul carriers.Stationing staff in Germany also means grappling with stringent employment laws and powerful unions, potential headaches for companies seeking to keep expenses low.Lufthansa’s pilot, cabin-crew and ground-crew unions wrote to European Commission President Ursula von Der Leyen on Friday saying that a shift of slots to discount carriers would cause a “massive hollowing out” of labor standards and pay.Disruption AheadThe French market could open up as Air France-KLM reins in its network in response to environmental demands from the French government. A restructuring to be presented within months will call for a 40% cut in domestic French capacity by the end of 2021, Chief Executive Officer Ben Smith told shareholders last week.The company has also said it may raise new equity, potentially triggering EU scrutiny that could lead to slots being made available in the busy Paris and Amsterdam markets. The initial funding package avoided increasing state holdings amid acrimony between the French and Dutch governments over existing stakes.In Italy, Alitalia was in bankruptcy protection even before the virus hit. The rescue is regarded as dubious given the airline’s status, and the EU is expected to begin an investigation. Slot availability in Rome and Milan could be one outcome.Full-service airlines are also in retreat in the U.K., where British Airways and Virgin Atlantic Airways Ltd. have indicated they’ll exit London Gatwick airport to consolidate operations at the city’s Heathrow hub.That will consolidate Gatwick’s status as a discount and leisure-oriented base, leaving EasyJet unchallenged as the biggest operator and offering an opportunity for Ryanair and Wizz to expand their more modest presence.Discount airlines are also cutting their cloth, though not nearly so much.Wizz will maintain all of its European bases and routes, while trimming frequencies, Varadi said. It announced four new hubs and 50 new routes on Friday.“We’re sensing strong demand, which we aim to tap as travel restrictions ease,” the CEO said.(Updates with Vestager comments in 12th paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Coronavirus: Ryanair to slash fares by half in flight price war
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Coronavirus: Ryanair to slash fares by half in flight price war

    Ryanair is preparing a "pile them high, sell them cheap" price war to lure passengers onto its summer holiday flights.

  • Ryanair's Lauda airline shuts down Vienna base
    Reuters

    Ryanair's Lauda airline shuts down Vienna base

    Ryanair's <RYA.I> Austrian carrier Lauda said on Friday it was closing down its Vienna base after failing to reach an agreement with unions on pay, and had already relocated many of its 15 planes to other bases. Chief Executive Michael O'Leary said earlier this month that the group would shut down Lauda's main hub in the Austrian capital and bring in Ryanair jets instead unless staff agreed to a pay cut and a new labour agreement. A Lauda spokeswoman said the shut-down involved the loss of around 370 jobs and comes after Lauda failed to agree a new collective wage deal with the union even after management made a new offer with improved conditions on Thursday.

  • Here's Why Spirit Airlines Rallies 28.4% in the Past 7 Days
    Zacks

    Here's Why Spirit Airlines Rallies 28.4% in the Past 7 Days

    Low fuel costs are aiding Spirit Airlines (SAVE). Average fuel cost per gallon falls 13.4% in the March quarter.

  • American Airlines Plans 30% Staff Cut, More Layoffs Likely
    Zacks

    American Airlines Plans 30% Staff Cut, More Layoffs Likely

    American Airlines' (AAL) job cut plans are part of its cost-cutting measures as it prepares to operate a smaller airline for the foreseeable future.

  • United Airlines (UAL) COO to Step Down, Focus on Cost Cuts
    Zacks

    United Airlines (UAL) COO to Step Down, Focus on Cost Cuts

    United Airlines (UAL) COO is stepping down to focus on more important medium and long-term issues, including cost structure changes.

  • Coronavirus: Ryanair passengers still waiting for refunds
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Coronavirus: Ryanair passengers still waiting for refunds

    Only 5% of Ryanair customers said they received a refund within the legal limit of seven days, according to a survey.

  • Budget airlines put squeeze on airports in coronavirus cost drive
    Reuters

    Budget airlines put squeeze on airports in coronavirus cost drive

    European low-cost airlines are pressuring airports to slash charges in return for resuming flights, as the COVID-19 shutdown intensifies their race with traditional carriers to lower costs and win post-pandemic business. In letters shared with Reuters, Wizz Air <WIZZ.L>, Ryanair <RYA.I> and easyJet <EZJ.L> have demanded long-lasting fee discounts or waivers from airports, signalling that the lowest offers will win more returning traffic. Wizz Air, in a "request for proposals" from airports last month, indicated it was ready to shake up its business, flagging "significant shifts in network strategy resulting in capacity reallocation between airports".

  • Airline Stock Roundup: LTM Files for Bankruptcy Protection, DAL, RYAAY in Focus
    Zacks

    Airline Stock Roundup: LTM Files for Bankruptcy Protection, DAL, RYAAY in Focus

    The likes of Delta (DAL) and United Airlines (UAL) are looking at ways to promote cleanliness in a bid to encourage passengers to resume flying.

  • Ryanair's holiday bookings surge, sees UK dropping quarantine
    Reuters

    Ryanair's holiday bookings surge, sees UK dropping quarantine

    Ryanair <RYA.I> expects Britain to join other European nations in dropping COVID-19 quarantine plans in the coming weeks, its CEO told Reuters on Wednesday, as he reported a "big surge" in holiday bookings from the country. Last week, Britain announced a 14-day quarantine from June 8 for all air passenger arrivals, including its own citizens, even as countries such as Italy and Spain move to ease equivalent restrictions. Ryanair CEO Michael O'Leary said many Britons had not been deterred by the move, with booking rates in recent days indicating the 1,000 daily flights it plans to fly in July - 40% of normal capacity - were likely to be 50% to 60% full.

  • Ryanair challenges Lufthansa's bailout package
    Reuters

    Ryanair challenges Lufthansa's bailout package

    Low-cost carrier Ryanair challenged Germany's 9 billion euro rescue package for Lufthansa on Tuesday, saying it distorted competition, while the German carrier moves towards finalising the deal next month. The government-backed aid will allow Lufthansa to "engage in below-cost selling" and make it harder for Ryanair, its Laudamotion subsidiary and rival low-cost carrier easyJet to compete, Ryanair Chief Executive Michael O'Leary said in a statement on Tuesday. "Ryanair will appeal against this latest example of illegal state aid to Lufthansa, which will massively distort competition," O'Leary said in the statement.

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