SBRY.L - J Sainsbury plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
195.75
+1.70 (+0.88%)
At close: 4:35PM GMT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close194.05
Open190.05
Bid194.90 x 0
Ask194.95 x 0
Day's range186.80 - 196.75
52-week range177.05 - 20,130.00
Volume12,010,855
Avg. volume7,567,676
Market cap4.332B
Beta (5Y monthly)0.77
PE ratio (TTM)108.75
EPS (TTM)1.80
Earnings date30 Apr 2020
Forward dividend & yield0.11 (5.77%)
Ex-dividend date14 Nov 2019
1y target est317.00
  • Walmart confirms early stage talks on sale of Asda
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Walmart confirms early stage talks on sale of Asda

    The world’s largest retailer said that it has received 'inbound interest' about Asda from a small number of parties.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Walmart in talks with third parties over investment in UK arm Asda

    Walmart, the world's largest retailer, said on Wednesday that following "inbound interest" it was in talks with a small number of interested parties regarding an opportunity to invest in Asda, its British supermarket arm, alongside itself. Last year Walmart said it was considering a future stock market listing for Asda after its attempt to merge with UK rival Sainsbury's was blocked by regulators. It said on Wednesday it firmly believes that an IPO is an attractive long-term objective for Asda.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Britain's Tesco tests cashless store in London

    Tesco, Britain's biggest supermarket chain, opened its first high street cashless store on Tuesday, marking a shift among shoppers to electronic payments from coins and notes. At the Tesco Express store on High Holborn in central London, shoppers can pay at self-service tills using a range of electronic payment methods, including debit cards, credit cards and Apple Pay on their phones. It is Tesco's first mainstream store to go cashless after it opened one at its Welwyn Garden City headquarters campus in 2018.

  • Why I would avoid this FTSE 100 stalwart
    Fool.co.uk

    Why I would avoid this FTSE 100 stalwart

    Jabran Khan looks into recent news about a well-known supermarket brand.The post Why I would avoid this FTSE 100 stalwart appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Tesco unlawfully stopped rivals from opening stores - UK regulator

    Tesco, Britain's biggest retailer, unlawfully stopped major supermarket rivals from opening shops near its stores, the country's competition regulator said on Friday. The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) said it first discovered that Tesco had been preventing landlords from letting property to other supermarkets during monitoring in 2018. Tesco then reviewed all of its land agreements, finding 23 breaches in total.

  • No savings at 40? I’d buy these 2 bargain FTSE 100 stocks to retire on a passive income
    Fool.co.uk

    No savings at 40? I’d buy these 2 bargain FTSE 100 stocks to retire on a passive income

    These two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) shares could deliver high returns in my opinion.The post No savings at 40? I'd buy these 2 bargain FTSE 100 stocks to retire on a passive income appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Sainsbury's Bank chairman Davis to step down
    Reuters

    Sainsbury's Bank chairman Davis to step down

    British supermarket group Sainsbury's said on Wednesday that Roger Davis, chairman of its poorly performing banking division, will step down. The announcement comes five months after Sainsbury's completed a strategic review of its financial services business, which made an underlying operating profit of just 20 million pounds in the six months to August 31. At its capital markets day in September, Sainsbury's detailed a plan to double the division's underlying profit within five years.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Sainsbury's Bank chairman Roger Davis to step down

    The banking division of British supermarket group Sainsbury's has started the search for a new chairman after Roger Davis notified the board he plans to step down, the firm said on Wednesday. Davis has chaired the Sainsbury's Bank board for nearly seven years. Sainsbury's said a search to find his replacement will begin and a further announcement regarding timings of his retirement and news of his successor will be made in due course.

  • Volatility 101: Should J Sainsbury (LON:SBRY) Shares Have Dropped 30%?
    Simply Wall St.

    Volatility 101: Should J Sainsbury (LON:SBRY) Shares Have Dropped 30%?

    Investors can approximate the average market return by buying an index fund. But if you buy individual stocks, you can...

  • Alcohol-free beer and veg sales soar in 'month of moderation'
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Alcohol-free beer and veg sales soar in 'month of moderation'

    Kantar figures show shoppers having a healthier start to the year, with sales of alcohol-free drinks, aubergines and vegetarian burgers soaring at supermarkets.

  • 3 high-dividend-yield stocks I’d invest in for February
    Fool.co.uk

    3 high-dividend-yield stocks I’d invest in for February

    Jonathan Smith outlines three of his favourite dividend-paying stocks at the moment.The post 3 high-dividend-yield stocks I'd invest in for February appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Britain's supermarkets see weak start to year - Kantar

    Britain's grocery industry endured a subdued start to the year with all of the traditional big four supermarket groups seeing year-on-year sales declines in the latest 12-week trading period, industry data showed on Tuesday. Market researcher Kantar said total UK grocery sales rose just 0.3% in the 12 weeks to Jan. 26, as consumers cut down on alcohol and meat, buying-in to "Dry January" and "Veganuary" campaigns.

  • Sainsbury's Coupe says exit not due to failure of Asda deal
    Reuters

    Sainsbury's Coupe says exit not due to failure of Asda deal

    The boss of British supermarket group Sainsbury's , Mike Coupe, said he was not stepping down in May because of his failure to buy rival Asda last year. Sainsbury's agreed 7.3 billion pound ($9.6 billion) deal for Walmart owned Asda was blocked by Britain's competition regulator in April. Coupe, who is 60 this year, has been at Sainsbury's for 15 years, six as chief executive.

  • Sainsbury's targets 2040 for net zero emissions, criticizes UK goal
    Reuters

    Sainsbury's targets 2040 for net zero emissions, criticizes UK goal

    Sainsbury's committed itself on Tuesday to have net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2040, a decade ahead of the British government's own target which it said "isn't soon enough". Britons have become increasingly aware of the urgency of addressing climate change, spurred on by climate campaigners including veteran naturalist and broadcaster David Attenborough and Swedish teen activist Greta Thunberg. Sainsbury's, Britain's second-biggest supermarket group which trades from some 2,300 locations, employs 185,000 people across Britain and Ireland and has over 27 million customers each week, said it would spend 1.0 billion pounds ($1.3 billion) to hit the target.

  • Sainsbury's targets 2040 for net zero emissions, criticises UK goal
    Reuters

    Sainsbury's targets 2040 for net zero emissions, criticises UK goal

    Sainsbury's committed itself on Tuesday to have net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2040, a decade ahead of the British government's own target which it said "isn't soon enough". Britons have become increasingly aware of the urgency of addressing climate change, spurred on by climate campaigners including veteran naturalist and broadcaster David Attenborough and Swedish teen activist Greta Thunberg. Sainsbury's, Britain's second-biggest supermarket group which trades from some 2,300 locations, employs 185,000 people across Britain and Ireland and has over 27 million customers each week, said it would spend 1.0 billion pounds to hit the target.

  • Sainsbury's pledges to invest £1bn to hit 'net zero' emissions target by 2040
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Sainsbury's pledges to invest £1bn to hit 'net zero' emissions target by 2040

    The supermarket's target is a decade earlier than the UK’s legal goal to cut the country’s greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050.

  • What do the Christmas sales numbers hint at for J Sainsbury’s future?
    Fool.co.uk

    What do the Christmas sales numbers hint at for J Sainsbury’s future?

    Could the difference between the food and the Argos arms of the company be signs of the fundamental issues at Sainsbury’s? The post What do the Christmas sales numbers hint at for J Sainsbury’s future? appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Sainsbury Badly Needs Vision to Combat Amazon and Aldi
    Bloomberg

    Sainsbury Badly Needs Vision to Combat Amazon and Aldi

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Almost a year since competition authorities dealt a mortal blow to J Sainsbury Plc’s $9.1 billion plan to buy Walmart Inc.’s Asda, Mike Coupe is stepping down as chief executive officer of Britain’s second-largest supermarket chain. He’s been at the helm for almost six years and will be 60 in September, so it’s a natural time to hang up his grocer’s apron.But Coupe’s departure looked inevitable once the Asda combination collapsed. Whether or not Sainsbury mishandled the competition risks, for any CEO, grinding out growth in a sluggish market is far less exciting than pulling off an audacious deal.The choice of Simon Roberts, currently retail and operations director, to succeed him is a surprising one given that his most recent experience before Sainsbury wasn’t in food retail, and he’s a relatively new arrival at the group. Sainsbury’s former finance director, John Rogers, was widely seen as Coupe’s heir apparent, until he left for advertising company WPP Plc in October. This may explain his departure. Roberts, 48, is a hands-on shopkeeper. He spent 15 years at Marks & Spencer Group Plc and 13 years at Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc. before joining Sainsbury two and half years ago. But the changes that Sainsbury has made to its stores since then haven’t always gone smoothly. A management overhaul in 2018 led to empty shelves and unkempt shops. In a fast-changing retail market, executives need to augment operational expertise with strategic vision. It’s not yet clear that Roberts has that.It’s interesting that Britain’s two biggest supermarkets, Tesco Plc and Sainsbury, will be led by executives who spent many years at pharmacy retailer Boots. Perhaps it’s replacing Asda as the training ground for top executives. It may be that working for Walgreens CEO Stefano Pessina, who’s known for not suffering fools gladly, is the perfect preparation for taking on difficult challenges — even the brutal U.K. supermarket business.Roberts will need all of the skills he honed under the Italian dealmaker to keep Sainsbury on track. First of all, he must continue to battle the company’s other major rivals which make up the U.K.’s Big Four grocers — Tesco, Asda and Wm Morrison Supermarkets Plc. And he must defend Sainsbury from the U.K. arms of the German discounters, Aldi and Lidl, which are increasingly forging into Sainsbury’s heartland in the south eastern U.K. Coupe did a good job cutting Sainsbury’s prices on everyday items. Roberts must continue this. For a while in 2018 and early 2019, after the damaging store-management overhaul, sales growth slipped behind that of rivals. Sainsbury was beginning to  look like the sick grocer from which everyone else was seeking to steal market share. Its sales have recovered since, but Roberts must maintain that momentum.Secondly, Sainsbury must get Argos, the catalog retailer that Coupe acquired four years ago, back on track. The business, which sells everything from toys to tents, had a poor Christmas. In order to defend itself from the mighty Amazon.com Inc., it must better exploit its combination of online presence and bricks-and-mortar stores, as well as ensure its prices are right. On Tuesday, Sainsbury announced it would further integrate Argos into Sainsbury, axing hundreds of management jobs and cutting costs as it merges divisions including commercial retail and finance. This program must be managed without disruption.If all of this doesn’t go to plan, there is always the risk that Sainsbury, perennially tipped as a takeover target, could finally attract the attentions of a bidder. No one can fault Coupe for his bold decisions. In an environment where just keeping your head above water is hard enough, he was prepared to make daring moves. Unfortunately, they didn’t always pay off.To contact the author of this story: Andrea Felsted at afelsted@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

By using Yahoo, you agree that we and our partners can use cookies for purposes such as customising content and advertising. See our Privacy Policy to learn more