SLA.L - Standard Life Aberdeen plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
308.30
+0.20 (+0.06%)
At close: 4:35PM GMT
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Previous close308.10
Open306.00
Bid307.40 x 0
Ask307.40 x 0
Day's range304.10 - 319.50
52-week range219.10 - 319.55
Volume4,546,239
Avg. volume9,129,180
Market cap7.249B
Beta (3Y monthly)1.23
PE ratio (TTM)6.64
EPS (TTM)46.40
Earnings date7 Aug 2019
Forward dividend & yield0.22 (7.01%)
Ex-dividend date2019-08-15
1y target est380.07
  • Standard Life reviews timing of new pay plan after revolt
    Reuters

    Standard Life reviews timing of new pay plan after revolt

    Asset manager Standard Life Aberdeen could bring forward its plans for a new remuneration policy, it said on Thursday, after facing a rebellion over pay earlier this year. More than 40% of SLA shareholders voted against the company's pay report at its annual general meeting in May. SLA said this was due to concern about new chief financial officer Stephanie Bruce's pay. SLA itself frequently criticises the companies in which it invests for high executive pay.

  • Standard Life Aberdeen share price up 30% in 3 months. Is it time to buy?
    Fool.co.uk

    Standard Life Aberdeen share price up 30% in 3 months. Is it time to buy?

    Standard Life Aberdeen (LON: SLA) shares have been volatile this year, but after the latest surge is there more to come?

  • Have £10k to invest? I’d ditch a Cash ISA and buy these 2 FTSE 100 shares right now
    Fool.co.uk

    Have £10k to invest? I’d ditch a Cash ISA and buy these 2 FTSE 100 shares right now

    I think these two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) dividend shares could offer an impressive passive income.

  • Fund Colossus Amundi Leaves Rivals in Its Dust
    Bloomberg

    Fund Colossus Amundi Leaves Rivals in Its Dust

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- European fund management companies spent 2018 watching their share prices steadily decline, battered by increased regulatory scrutiny, customers withdrawing money and the relentless squeezing of fees. They’ve rallied this year, but the industry’s biggest beast in the region is outpacing its peers by an astonishing margin.Investors in Amundi SA have enjoyed a total return of more than 60% in 2019, outpacing the Stoxx Europe 600 index by 35 percentage points. The stock has beaten the 32% gains at DWS Group GmbH and Standard Life Aberdeen Plc, the 39% return for Schroders Plc and Man Group Plc’s 19% rise.Amundi, 68 percent-owned by France’s Credit Agricole SA, recently announced record quarterly inflows of almost 43 billion euros ($48 billion) in the three months through September, breaking a streak of three consecutive quarters of client withdrawals. Its 1.6 trillion euros of assets under management — up from 952 billion euros when it listed on the stock market in November 2015 — make it Europe’s biggest money manager.The most impressive statistic, however, is the one element of Amundi’s financials over which it has most control: its costs.The company’s frugality has nudged its cost-to-income ratio lower in recent years; it fell to an industry-beating 51.1% at the end of the third quarter. By comparison, Deutsche Bank AG-controlled DWS aims to cut its ratio to 65% and doesn’t expect to achieve that until the end of 2021.What could knock Amundi off its perch? Well, DWS Chief Executive Officer Asoka Woehrmann told the Financial Times this month that he plans to challenge his rival’s dominance by finding a takeover or merger that would increase his firm’s 752 billion euros of assets. Earlier this year Switzerland’s UBS Group AG was reported to be considering strapping its fund management arm to DWS. Insurer Allianz SE was also said to be interested in the German investment firm. Any such deal would create a challenger with the scale to match Amundi.But the French fund giant’s CEO Yves Perrier is unlikely to just stand by if industry consolidation begins. Now that he’s finished absorbing Pioneer Investments, a fund management unit bought from Italy’s UniCredit SpA for 3.5 billion euros in 2017, the decks are clear. While these mega-mergers might not happen, Amundi is well placed if they do. With its shares trading at their highest in more than 18 months, Perrier has the currency to fund a deal.To contact the author of this story: Mark Gilbert at magilbert@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Mark Gilbert is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering asset management. He previously was the London bureau chief for Bloomberg News. He is also the author of "Complicit: How Greed and Collusion Made the Credit Crisis Unstoppable."For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Can the Standard Life Aberdeen share price double your money?
    Fool.co.uk

    Can the Standard Life Aberdeen share price double your money?

    The Standard Life Aberdeen share price has slumped over the past three years, and it looks unlikely to recover, says Rupert Hargreaves.

  • BHP's London AGM rejects call to quit 'pro-coal' associations
    Reuters

    BHP's London AGM rejects call to quit 'pro-coal' associations

    BHP shareholders are poised to reject a motion urging the world's biggest listed miner to suspend membership of some industry bodies judged to be at odds with goals to tackle climate change, initial voting in London suggested on Thursday. Ethical investors have called for the suspension, arguing BHP's membership of some industry organisations funds pro-coal lobbying. One of BHP's biggest shareholders, Aberdeen Standard Investments, part of Standard Life Aberdeen, last week spoke out in favour of the resolution, saying lobby groups can be a major obstacle to positive change.

  • Forget Bitcoin! Why I’m buying Standard Life share price for 2020
    Fool.co.uk

    Forget Bitcoin! Why I’m buying Standard Life share price for 2020

    Cryptocurrency isn't any kind of long-term strategy for income and won't make you richer. Try this 8% yielder instead and I think you'll be much happier.

  • Looking for income? I’d buy these 2 FTSE 100 stocks which yield 7% tax free in an ISA
    Fool.co.uk

    Looking for income? I’d buy these 2 FTSE 100 stocks which yield 7% tax free in an ISA

    Harvey Jones picks out two FTSE 100 (INDEXFTSE:UKX) stocks offering juicy yields right now.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 2-Top-5 BHP investor Aberdeen Standard piles on climate pressure ahead of AGM

    One of BHP's biggest shareholders Aberdeen Standard Investments on Wednesday added to pressure for the world's leading miner to cut ties with lobby groups it says are at odds with the company's pledges on climate leadership. Earlier, the Church of England Pensions Board urged shareholder advisers to review their opposition to a resolution calling on BHP to withdraw from groups that lobby for policies inconsistent with global climate change limitation goals. Aberdeen Standard Investments, which holds around 3.2% of BHP's stock, said it was taking the rare step of speaking out ahead of a vote at BHP's annual shareholder meeting in London on Oct. 17 because of the urgency of tackling climate change, and after its research found the lobby groups were the biggest single obstacle to progress.

  • Why the Standard Life Aberdeen share price rose 15% in September
    Fool.co.uk

    Why the Standard Life Aberdeen share price rose 15% in September

    G A Chester discusses the strong rise of the Standard Life share price last month, and gives his view on the company's prospects.

  • Is the Standard Life share price a bargain or should I buy this dividend-growing mid-cap?
    Fool.co.uk

    Is the Standard Life share price a bargain or should I buy this dividend-growing mid-cap?

    The Standard Life Aberdeen share price suggests an uncertain outlook, says Roland Head.

  • Fund Giant Founder Abandons $1 Trillion Club Dream
    Bloomberg

    Fund Giant Founder Abandons $1 Trillion Club Dream

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The merger that created Standard Life Aberdeen Plc two years ago was designed to produce an asset manager big enough to survive the existential threats facing the fund management industry. Martin Gilbert, founder of the Aberdeen side of the equation, hoped to join what he called “that $1 trillion club” by growing assets under management. The reality has been somewhat different.Standard Life Aberdeen’s current market value of 6.7 billion pounds ($8.2 billion) is about half of what it was in August 2017 when the merger was completed. Back then, the company oversaw 670 billion pounds. Outflows in every quarter since have reduced that to 577.5 billion pounds – leaving it about 30% short of the magical figure cited by Gilbert.So Wednesday’s announcement that he’s leaving the firm after more than three decades marks something of a failure for the dealmaker. Starting with what he says was “three people in one office in Aberdeen,” Gilbert brokered more than 40 deals during his career, with his fund management company qualifying for inclusion in the benchmark FTSE 100 index in 2012.His departure was perhaps inevitable after Standard Life Aberdeen made Keith Skeoch sole chief executive officer in March, abandoning the dual-CEO roles around since the merger and demoting Gilbert to vice chairman. But it must still sting.The merger was supposed to herald a wave of tie-ups in the industry as fellow mid-sized asset managers recognized the benefits of scale and sought to strengthen themselves through alliances. Apart from the creation of Janus Henderson Group Plc, though, big M&A deals have proven illusory.  And even the architect of that transaction seems to have had second thoughts. “Big isn’t necessarily better,” Andrew Formica, who engineered the 2017 merger of Henderson with Janus Capital, said in August from his new position as CEO of the much smaller Jupiter Fund Management Plc.It’s impossible to verify or falsify Skeoch’s oft-repeated claim that his company is still better off than the two standalone companies would have been. But it’s fair to say that the perceived failure of the industry’s two big mergers to deliver value for shareholders has deterred others from seeking similar transactions.For his part, Gilbert says he’s “looking forward to fresh challenges in the next stage of my career.” The 64-year-old looks set to join U.K. fintech startup Revolut Ltd. Two years on, though, the biggest deal of his career looks more like a warning of the dangers of overconfidence than a roadmap for the asset management industry.To contact the author of this story: Mark Gilbert at magilbert@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Mark Gilbert is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering asset management. He previously was the London bureau chief for Bloomberg News. He is also the author of "Complicit: How Greed and Collusion Made the Credit Crisis Unstoppable."For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Veteran investor Gilbert to leave Standard Life Aberdeen
    Reuters

    Veteran investor Gilbert to leave Standard Life Aberdeen

    Veteran investor Martin Gilbert will leave Standard Life Aberdeen next year, ending a career spanning more than three decades at the helm of one of Britain's most successful asset managers. Gilbert oversaw the meteoric rise of Aberdeen Asset Management, the small company he co-founded in 1983 with just 50 million pounds in assets, to what became the country's biggest listed fund firm at the time of its 11 billion pound merger with Standard Life in 2017. Touted as a strong tie-up of two of Scotland's biggest financial services companies, Gilbert and Standard Life peer Keith Skeoch initially shared the role of chief executive, despite some discontent from shareholders.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 2-Veteran investor Gilbert to leave Standard Life Aberdeen

    Veteran investor Martin Gilbert will leave Standard Life Aberdeen next year, ending a career spanning more than three decades at the helm of one of Britain's most successful asset managers. Gilbert oversaw the meteoric rise of Aberdeen Asset Management, the small company he co-founded in 1983 with just 50 million pounds in assets, to what became the country's biggest listed fund firm at the time of its 11 billion pound merger with Standard Life in 2017. Touted as a strong tie-up of two of Scotland's biggest financial services companies, Gilbert and Standard Life peer Keith Skeoch initially shared the role of chief executive, despite some discontent from shareholders.

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