STAN.L - Standard Chartered PLC

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
452.90
+17.90 (+4.11%)
As of 1:00PM BST. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close435.00
Open451.00
Bid452.90 x 0
Ask453.20 x 0
Day's range451.00 - 461.00
52-week range368.40 - 742.60
Volume1,878,931
Avg. volume8,377,301
Market cap14.294B
Beta (5Y monthly)1.36
PE ratio (TTM)9.46
EPS (TTM)47.90
Earnings date29 Jul 2019 - 02 Aug 2019
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend date05 Mar 2020
1y target est8.78
  • The HSBC share price is soaring today. Yet I wouldn’t buy this stock, or Standard Chartered
    Fool.co.uk

    The HSBC share price is soaring today. Yet I wouldn’t buy this stock, or Standard Chartered

    The HSBC share price is up this morning, but the FTSE 100 bank carries far too much political risk for me. I'd look elsewhere for income and growth.The post The HSBC share price is soaring today. Yet I wouldn't buy this stock, or Standard Chartered appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • The Standard Chartered share price – where next?
    Stockopedia

    The Standard Chartered share price – where next?

    The Standard Chartered (LON:STAN) share price has risen by 2.72% over the past month and it’s currently trading at 426.4. For investors considering whether to...

  • China’s Economy Continues Slow Recovery, Early Data Show
    Bloomberg

    China’s Economy Continues Slow Recovery, Early Data Show

    (Bloomberg) -- China’s economy continued its slow recovery from the coronavirus slump in June, with a better performance in the services sector and among smaller companies tempered by the still-grim global outlook.That’s the assessment from the earliest available indicators, which showed the economy continuing to strengthen, after a big pickup in May. The final result last month was stronger than initially seen, due to growth in the services sector, according to the purchasing manager indexes.The outlook fir smaller firms continued rising in June, according to a Standard Chartered Plc survey of companies, with indexes tracking confidence, outlook and new orders at their highest since the coronavirus shutdown.“Sales grew rapidly, mainly on stronger domestic demand,” according to Standard Chartered Economists Shen Lan and Ding Shuang. “Production activity picked up, with capacity usage accelerating and hiring increasing mildly.”China’s Slow Reboot Points to Hard Road Back for Global EconomyHowever, overseas orders continued to decline for those smaller companies. That confirms a trend also seen in the weak trade with South Korea in the first 20 days of the month -- a leading indicator of export demand.New export orders to smaller firms are still contracting, albeit at a slower pace, according to the Standard Chartered survey of more than 500 small firms. The index improved to 49.8 from 47.4 in April, with a number under 50 indicating a contraction.Deflation in producer prices also slowed somewhat. If that trend continues, it could mitigate declines in company profitability.Stocks and commodity markets rebounded over the past month after disappointment with the stimulus announced in late May at the National People’s Congress. Metal markets have been rising both on supply problems caused by the coronavirus, and rising demand in China.Stock markets globally have risen this month, and the domestic Chinese markets also resumed their climb after dropping in late May.Note on Early Indicator constructionBloomberg Economics generates the overall activity reading by aggregating the three-month weighted average of the monthly changes of eight indicators, which are based on business surveys or market prices.Major onshore stocks - CSI 300 index of A-share stocks listed in Shanghai or ShenzhenKey property stocks - All the constituents of CSI 300 Index that are in the real estate industryIron ore prices - Spot price of iron ore for shipment to Qingdao port (dollar/metric tonne)Copper prices - Spot price for refined copper in Shanghai market (yuan/metric tonne)South Korean exports - South Korean exports in the first 20 days of each monthFactory inflation tracker - Bloomberg Economics created tracker for Chinese producer pricesSmall and medium-sized business confidence - Survey of companies conducted by Standard Chartered BankSales manager sentiment - Survey of sales managers in Chinese companies by World Economics Ltd.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bank of Thailand Sees 8.1% Contraction, Pledges More Support
    Bloomberg

    Bank of Thailand Sees 8.1% Contraction, Pledges More Support

    (Bloomberg) -- The Bank of Thailand held its benchmark interest rate at an all-time low to support an economy it now sees contracting more than 8% this year, the worst on record.The central bank kept its policy rate at 0.5% on Wednesday in a unanimous decision, in line with the forecasts of all but four of the 26 economists in a Bloomberg survey.Policy makers revised down their growth forecast sharply, predicting an 8.1% contraction for this year, compared with a previous projection of a 5.3% decline. The coronavirus pandemic has devastated two of the economy’s main growth drivers, tourism and trade, with a slow recovery seen.With interest rates close to zero, the central bank is slowly running out of conventional policy space to support the economy. Officials have said they are studying unconventional steps, such as asset purchases and some form of yield curve control.“While the decision to hold rates unchanged came as no surprise, the sharp downward revisions to growth and inflation forecasts highlight the extent of pressure on the economy,” said Mitul Kotecha, a senior emerging markets strategist at TD Securities in Singapore.Some of the additional forecasts outlined by the central bank on Wednesday:Gross domestic product is seen rebounding to 5% next year, higher than the 3% forecast in MarchConsumer prices will probably contract 1.7% this year compared with a previous projection of -1%; core inflation is seen at 0%Exports will probably plunge 10.3% this year versus a previous forecast of -8.8%Tourist arrivals in 2020 will probably reach 8 million, down from an earlier projection of 15 million“BoT’s new forecasts signal slower economic recovery, leaving room for further rate cuts,” said Tim Leelahaphan, an economist at Standard Chartered Plc in Bangkok. “We forecast a 25 basis point cut in the third quarter.”With the virus outbreak easing, the government has begun lifting lockdown restrictions and reopening parts of the economy, giving a boost to local demand. Export demand remains weak though, with data on Wednesday showing a 22.5% plunge in shipments in May from a year earlier, the biggest drop since 2009.The currency is also emerging as a concern for policy makers worried that the strong baht will further undercut the fragile economy. The baht has gained more than 6% against the dollar in the past three months, making it the best performer in Asia after Indonesia’s rupiah.The monetary policy committee is “concerned about the strengthening baht which affects the economic recovery,” Titanun Mallikamas, an assistant governor, told reporters in Bangkok. “They see the need to monitor the baht closely and assess the need for additional measures if needed.”Thailand’s benchmark SET Index reversed its gain, falling 0.2% as of 2:52 p.m. in Bangkok. The baht extended its advance, rising 0.4% against the dollar.TD Securities’ Kotecha said the central bank will likely deliver more currency measures in the weeks ahead.“However, it is notable that the baht has so far ignored such measures and it will be a challenge to prevent further appreciation,” he said.The Bank of Thailand is facing a leadership transition with current Governor Veerathai Santiprabhob planning to leave his post after completing his five-year term in September. A selection committee is considering applications from four candidates, including from two current deputy governors, according to local media reports.(Updates with new GDP forecasts starting from first paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • ADNOC infrastructure deal backed by $8 billion bridge financing - sources
    Reuters

    ADNOC infrastructure deal backed by $8 billion bridge financing - sources

    A consortium of international investors obtained an $8 billion bridge loan provided by 17 banks for a gas infrastructure deal Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC) announced on Tuesday, sources said. ADNOC said earlier it had signed a $10 billion deal with investors including Global Infrastructure Partners, Brookfield Asset Management, Singapore's sovereign wealth fund GIC, Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan Board, NH Investment & Securities and Italy's Snam. The investors will acquire a 49% stake in ADNOC Gas Pipeline Assets, a newly formed subsidiary of ADNOC with lease rights to 38 pipelines, with ADNOC holding the remaining 51% majority stake, the company said.

  • Will the Standard Chartered share price run continue?
    Stockopedia

    Will the Standard Chartered share price run continue?

    In this article we will quickly re-cap the broker forecasts for Standard Chartered (LON:STAN). The Standard Chartered share price has risen by 3.09% over the p...

  • Singapore Won’t Feast on Hong Kong’s Fund Famine
    Bloomberg

    Singapore Won’t Feast on Hong Kong’s Fund Famine

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The two archrivals of Asian finance have competed so intensely for so long that it’s impossible to believe that Hong Kong’s fading autonomy and the resumption of anti-government protests isn’t filling Singapore with even a little bit of schadenfreude. It was a surprise, therefore, to see the Monetary Authority of Singapore rebut news reports that there had been large flows of deposits from Hong Kong. The MAS was responding to data that showed a near-fourfold jump in one corner of the Singapore banking system’s foreign-currency deposits over the past year:The central bank has a valid objection. The above chart only shows foreign-currency deposits in domestic banking units (DBUs). Include deposits in the the Asian currency units (ACUs), a fancy name for a different set of ledgers that the same banks use for their international business, and the fourfold growth turns out to be a 20% increase, to S$781 billion ($564 billion). Not exactly a deluge, though perhaps more than a puddle of rainwater on Singapore’s Orchard Road:There are plenty of reasons why deposits are rising, and not just in Singapore. Central banks everywhere are flooding lenders with liquidity to ease the pain of the coronavirus pandemic. Governments are putting money into people’s accounts, while cautious firms are stuffing theirs by drawing on previously unused working-capital lines.Besides, if deposits are fleeing Hong Kong, then banks in the territory must be feeling the pinch? That doesn’t seem to be the case: It was only in late May that China said that it would impose a national security law in Hong Kong. April data may not be capturing the gloom about Hong Kong’s future. Still, the immediate challenge for the special administrative region is capital inflows, which are forcing the monetary authority to buy billions of U.S. dollars to prevent the Hong Kong dollar from strengthening beyond 7.75, the outer boundary of the 7.75-7.85 range in which it is allowed to trade against the greenback.  Money is pouring in because Hong Kong dollar interest rates are higher than U.S. dollar rates, and also because JD.com Inc., China’s No. 2 online retailer, is selling shares in the city in what’s likely to be the world’s second-biggest initial public offering this year.A few mainland companies that no longer feel welcome in U.S. capital markets won’t be Hong Kong’s ticket to perennial preeminence. However, if the territory does bleed deposits, will Singapore want them? The two-ledger system, the reason for confusion about capital inflows, has its roots in the rivalry. In 1968, when founding prime minister Lee Kuan Yew decided to turn his tin- and rubber-exporting port into an international financial center, he had no real advantage over Hong Kong, then a British colony. But the devaluation of the pound in 1967 created demand for dollars in Asia, and Singapore grabbed the chance with the help of Dick van Oenen, a Dutch currency trader at Bank of America. Hong Kong, reluctant to admit new banks, took almost a decade to catch up. It was hesitant initially to host an offshore finance hub because those, like casinos, are best left to places that don’t have much other activity to protect. Singapore insulated its domestic economy from instability thanks to the different domestic and international ledger units, which demarcated banks’ high-stakes global commerce from their more humdrum local franchise. For five years now, authorities have been planning to end the divide, and in January parliament approved the merger of the two accounts. Since regulatory scrutiny of financial intermediaries has gone up in all the major economies from which Singapore hosts its foreign banks, there’s little point in continuing with a dual-track system. Even so, this chart should give the authorities pause:From roughly similar levels in 1991, deposits in Singapore — across both the ledgers, and including all currencies — have risen to $1 trillion, while Hong Kong’s have exploded to $1.8 trillion because of its outsize role in securing capital for Chinese firms. Singapore may have the competence and confidence to ensure that banks can backstop their IOUs, with or without help from their home countries. But will the regulators be comfortable if the state investment firm Temasek Holdings Pte. — the largest shareholder of both London-based Standard Chartered Plc and homegrown DBS Group Holdings Ltd.— sees value in combining the two banks, an idea that’s been doing the rounds for the better part of two decades, though never seriously entertained? Such a merger would give Singapore an institution at least half as big by deposit size as HSBC Holdings Plc, the gorilla of Hong Kong banking:But size isn’t everything. Deposits come from loans, and too much credit causes “financialization.” It’s a term economists use to describe situations in which a society sacrifices other priorities — such as manufacturing competitiveness, affordable housing and less leveraged firms — for a mirage of affluence.Singapore’s planners know that unlike London, New York or Hong Kong, which sits at the mouth of China’s planned Greater Bay Area, their island nation doesn’t have a hinterland to accommodate the losers of financialization.Orbigood, a Singaporean exclamation for others getting their comeuppance, is best kept for its rival’s cramped housing and noxious air. Singapore wouldn’t really want deposits to rush in from Hong Kong. It might do more harm than good.   This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andy Mukherjee is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies and financial services. He previously was a columnist for Reuters Breakingviews. He has also worked for the Straits Times, ET NOW and Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Aviva Investors 'uneasy' over HSBC, StanChart backing for Hong Kong security law
    Reuters

    Aviva Investors 'uneasy' over HSBC, StanChart backing for Hong Kong security law

    Aviva Investors, a leading shareholder in both HSBC <HSBA.L> and Standard Chartered <STAN.L>, said on Tuesday it was "uneasy" about the companies' decision to back a new security law in Hong Kong. Aviva Investors' Chief Investment Officer, Equities, David Cumming said both had done so without knowing the details of the law or how it will operate in practice. "If companies make political statements, they must accept the corporate responsibilities that follow," Cumming said.

  • HK residents rush for offshore bank accounts on China law worries: sources
    Reuters

    HK residents rush for offshore bank accounts on China law worries: sources

    Banks including HSBC, Standard Chartered and Citigroup have seen a spike in enquiries from Hong Kong residents about opening offshore accounts amid concerns stemming from China's decision to impose a national security law on the city, five people said. HSBC and Standard Chartered have each seen a 25-30% jump in enquiries, two of the people said. President Donald Trump has said he will strip Hong Kong of its special status under U.S. law if China moves ahead with the law that aims to curb sedition, secession, terrorism and foreign interference.

  • Backlash over HSBC and Standard Chartered's support for China's Hong Kong security law
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Backlash over HSBC and Standard Chartered's support for China's Hong Kong security law

    The banks have been accused of putting profits before people by supporting the widely condemned law.

  • HSBC, StanChart criticised for backing Hong Kong security law
    Reuters

    HSBC, StanChart criticised for backing Hong Kong security law

    Senior British and U.S. politicians criticised HSBC and Standard Chartered on Thursday after the banks backed China's national security law for Hong Kong, in conflict with the British government's opposition to the proposed legislation. In a break from their usual policy of political neutrality, the British banks on Wednesday expressed support for the law even as it drew global condemnation, including from Britain, and revived anti-government demonstrations in the Asian financial hub of Hong Kong. Shares in HSBC, which is Britain's biggest bank, fell more than 1% in London, paring earlier gains in its Hong-Kong listed stocks while Standard Chartered shares in London were flat.

  • Stock market crash: I think these 2 FTSE 100 stocks could help you get rich from the recovery
    Fool.co.uk

    Stock market crash: I think these 2 FTSE 100 stocks could help you get rich from the recovery

    The stock market crash offers investors the opportunity to buy these two FTSE 100 stocks at reduced prices, before they recover.The post Stock market crash: I think these 2 FTSE 100 stocks could help you get rich from the recovery appeared first on The Motley Fool UK.

  • Brokers bullish on Standard Chartered shares
    Stockopedia

    Brokers bullish on Standard Chartered shares

    The Standard Chartered (LON:STAN) share price has risen by 7.39% over the past month and it’s currently trading at 395. For investors considering whether to bu...

  • Oilprice.com

    Have Oil Traders Abandoned Fundamentals?

    Oil prices are back at levels last seen in mid-March, and while fundamentals for crude have improved somewhat, markets have become too optimistic

  • Emirates NBD has $23.7 million exposure to fallen agri-trader Phoenix
    Reuters

    Emirates NBD has $23.7 million exposure to fallen agri-trader Phoenix

    Emirates NBD has $23.66 million to the Dubai subsidiary of Phoenix Commodities which had recently filed for liquidation, Dubai's biggest lender said on Tuesday. Emirates NBD bank said in a statement that the exposure was to Phoenix Global DMCC, a unit of Phoenix Commodities Pvt Ltd. Phoenix, with offices in Dubai and Singapore, is being liquidated after amassing more than $400 million in potential trading losses, according a document prepared by the liquidators seen by Reuters.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Commodities trader Phoenix goes into liquidation due to coronavirus -documents

    Phoenix Commodities Pvt Ltd, a trader of agricultural products with offices in Dubai and Singapore, is being liquidated after amassing more than $400 million in potential trading losses, according a document prepared by the liquidators seen by Reuters. Phoenix blamed the liabilities on currency volatility caused by the onset of the coronavirus, affecting financial derivatives linked to the U.S. dollar and other currencies, the document prepared by the liquidators said. Executives from restructuring firms Quantuma LLP and KRyS Global were appointed as joint liquidators and notice was sent to the company's creditors on April 24, according to the document.

  • Why this large-cap dividend could be worth a look
    Stockopedia

    Why this large-cap dividend could be worth a look

    The compounding effects of reinvesting dividends over the long-term can be spectacular - but finding stocks to help you do it is a challenge... The present eco8230;

  • StanChart highlights climate goals amid criticism over carbon financing
    Reuters

    StanChart highlights climate goals amid criticism over carbon financing

    Standard Chartered defended its environmental credentials after renewed criticism from climate campaigners for its funding of fossil fuel companies as the bank held its annual shareholder meeting on Wednesday. Chairman Jose Vinals delivered his message to investors via a video posted on the bank's website because the coronavirus lockdown restrictions in Britain means that shareholder gatherings are not allowed. The Spanish economist, who has served as chairman of the bank since December 2016, said StanChart had "long recognised" the threat of climate change and would continue to "respond robustly", pointing to goals to help clients transition to having less than 10% of revenues derived from coal by 2030.

  • StanChart chairman predicts economic recovery led by Asia in late 2020
    Reuters

    StanChart chairman predicts economic recovery led by Asia in late 2020

    Standard Chartered Chairman Jose Vinals said on Wednesday his Asia-focused bank was well placed to benefit from a late 2020 economic rally, despite the "extraordinary" impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the global economy. The bank's annual investor meeting was closed to shareholders in line with government restrictions to control the spread of the new coronavirus.

  • Standard Chartered highlights climate goals amid criticism over carbon financing
    Reuters

    Standard Chartered highlights climate goals amid criticism over carbon financing

    Standard Chartered defended its environmental credentials after renewed criticism from climate campaigners for its funding of fossil fuel companies as the bank held its annual shareholder meeting on Wednesday. Chairman Jose Vinals delivered his message to investors via a video posted on the bank's website because the coronavirus lockdown restrictions in Britain means that shareholder gatherings are not allowed. The Spanish economist, who has served as chairman of the bank since December 2016, said StanChart had "long recognised" the threat of climate change and would continue to "respond robustly", pointing to goals to help clients transition to having less than 10% of revenues derived from coal by 2030.

  • StanChart Kenya restructures 6% of loan book due to coronavirus
    Reuters

    StanChart Kenya restructures 6% of loan book due to coronavirus

    Standard Chartered Bank Kenya <SCBK.NR> has adjusted the terms of more than 8 billion shillings ($75.4 million) of its loans to individuals and businesses - about 6% of the total - to help them weather the impact of COVID-19, it said on Wednesday. Lenders in the East African nation have so far restructured 81.7 billion shillings in loans since the central bank allowed them to offer relief to distressed borrowers on March 18, the central bank said last week. StanChart Kenya's Chief Executive Kariuki Ngari said some borrowers whose businesses or earnings have been hit by the pandemic were struggling with cash flows, creating the need for them to restructure their loan repayments.

  • Such Is Life: How Standard Chartered (LON:STAN) Shareholders Saw Their Shares Drop 63%
    Simply Wall St.

    Such Is Life: How Standard Chartered (LON:STAN) Shareholders Saw Their Shares Drop 63%

    Generally speaking long term investing is the way to go. But that doesn't mean long term investors can avoid big...

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Stocks prices suggests virus crisis ends in December

    You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@thomsonreuters.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@thomsonreuters.com) and Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@thomsonreuters.com) in London and Stefano Rebaudo (stefano.rebaudo@thomsonreuters.com) in Milan. According to UBS Europe Daily, current stocks prices suggest investors expect the world to get out of the coronavirus crisis by the end of the year.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-Rotate if you dare

    You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@thomsonreuters.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@thomsonreuters.com) and Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@thomsonreuters.com) in London and Stefano Rebaudo (stefano.rebaudo@thomsonreuters.com) in Milan. There's certainly been quite some talk over the last few days about how it might be time to rotate out of the big tech stocks which have helped stock markets rebound from the depth of the coronavirus crash. Deutsche Bank analysts had the same take: "The reversion seems mostly to have been driven by a rotation out of large-cap Tech names like Facebook and Amazon ahead of earnings announcements in favour of more ‘value’ oriented stocks".

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    LIVE MARKETS-The unloved 25% rally in Europe

    You can share your thoughts with Thyagaraju Adinarayan (thyagaraju.adinarayan@thomsonreuters.com), Joice Alves (joice.alves@thomsonreuters.com) and Julien Ponthus (julien.ponthus@thomsonreuters.com) in London and Stefano Rebaudo (stefano.rebaudo@thomsonreuters.com) in Milan. Barclays paints this picture with a set of flow numbers showing risk aversion, particularly for European stocks.

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