STT - State Street Corporation

NYSE - NYSE Delayed price. Currency in USD
77.02
+1.66 (+2.20%)
At close: 4:02PM EST

77.02 0.00 (0.00%)
After hours: 6:07PM EST

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close75.36
Open76.36
Bid76.94 x 800
Ask76.95 x 1000
Day's range76.09 - 77.26
52-week range48.62 - 77.26
Volume2,307,865
Avg. volume2,438,487
Market cap28.006B
Beta (3Y monthly)1.58
PE ratio (TTM)15.19
EPS (TTM)5.07
Earnings date16 Jan 2020 - 20 Jan 2020
Forward dividend & yield2.08 (2.76%)
Ex-dividend date2019-09-30
1y target est70.87
  • Business Wire

    State Street Global Advisors Announces Impact of Receiving Payment

    The SPDR® Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) listed in the table below, announced today that each Fund received a payment as an authorized claimant from a class action settlement. The SPDR S&P Oil & Gas Equipment & Services ETF (XES) received payment related to Willbros Group, Inc. (NYSE: WG)*. The SPDR S&P Regional Banking ETF (KRE) received payment related to Wilmington Trust Corporation (NYSE: WL)**.

  • Major Regional Bank Stocks Outlook Rosy on Decent Loan Rise
    Zacks

    Major Regional Bank Stocks Outlook Rosy on Decent Loan Rise

    Major Regional Bank Stocks Outlook Rosy on Decent Loan Rise

  • Business Wire

    Charles River Development Appoints Spiros Giannaros as President

    Industry Veteran Returns to Support the Firm’s Front-to-Back Platform

  • Business Wire

    State Street Global Advisors Global Market Outlook 2020 – “The Only Way Out Is Through”

    State Street Global Advisors, the asset management business of State Street Corporation (STT) has today published its 2020 Global Market Outlook, predicting recession will be avoided through a continuation of growth, subject to the global economy “sidestepping substantial risks” to maintain momentum. “2020 is not a year of recession,” said Rick Lacaille, global chief investment officer at State Street Global Advisors. Low inflation, robust consumer spending and a relatively strong global services sector combine to propel the cycle forwards.

  • Business Wire

    LGIM Centralises Global Trading onto Charles River IMS

    Charles River Development, a State Street company, today announced that Legal and General Investment Management , one of Europe’s largest institutional asset managers, managing over £1 trillion in assets, has selected the Charles River Investment Management Solution to streamline their global trading operations.

  • Business Wire

    Jim Ross, SPDR Chairman and ETF Innovator, to Retire

    State Street Global Advisors, the asset management business of State Street Corporation (STT), announced today that Jim Ross, chairman, Global SPDR, will be retiring from the firm at the end of March 2020 after a distinguished 27-year career. Ross, who joined State Street in 1992, was instrumental in creating, developing and bringing to market many of the world’s first ETFs, earning him the moniker of the “godfather of ETFs.” The product grew from inception in 1993 when SPY was launched on the American Stock Exchange, to an industry that today stands at almost $6 trillion worldwide and is still one of the fastest -growing investment products in the market. “Without question Jim has been one of the most influential figures in the investment management industry,” said Ron O’Hanley, CEO and president, State Street.

  • Business Wire

    State Street Corporation Announces the Final Results of the Cash Tender Offer for any and all of its Floating Rate Junior Subordinated Debentures due 2047

    State Street Corporation today announced the final tender results of the previously announced cash tender offer by its principal banking subsidiary, State Street Bank and Trust Company , for any and all of the outstanding Floating Rate Junior Subordinated Debentures due 2047 listed in the table below , which were issued by State Street.

  • Business Wire

    State Street Expands MediaStats Offering with Macro Linkages Indicators

    New Macro Linkages Indicators to Help Investors Gauge Inter-Asset Connectedness across Global Equity Markets and Currencies

  • Business Wire

    SPDR® Gold Shares, the First US Gold-backed ETF That Changed How Investors Access Gold, Celebrates 15 Years

    State Street Global Advisors, the asset management business of State Street Corporation and the World Gold Council, the market development organization for the gold industry, this week celebrates the anniversary of the first US exchange traded fund backed entirely by physical gold, SPDR® Gold Shares .

  • UBS Group (UBS) Fined by MAS Over Bond Price Malpractice
    Zacks

    UBS Group (UBS) Fined by MAS Over Bond Price Malpractice

    The MAS fines UBS Group (UBS) for deceiving clients over prices of bonds and other structured products.

  • Business Wire

    State Street Announces President & Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer to Participate in the Goldman Sachs US Financial Services Conference

    State Street Corporation announced today that its President & Chief Executive Officer, Ron O’Hanley, and its Chief Financial Officer, Eric Aboaf, will participate in the Goldman Sachs US Financial Services Conference in New York on Wednesday, December 11, 2019 at 9:20 AM ET.

  • Business Wire

    State Street Named Servicing Provider for Avantis Investors’ Inaugural ETFs

    Firm Also Recognized as the Recipient of Several Notable ETF Servicing Awards

  • Buying Stocks At Record Highs Works Until It Doesn't
    Bloomberg

    Buying Stocks At Record Highs Works Until It Doesn't

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Those who bought stocks as they soared to new records last week amid rising optimism for a trade deal are probably suffering buyer’s remorse after President Donald Trump said the U.S. hasn’t agreed to a rollback of tariffs on China. Are those regrets warranted?As the Dow Jones Industrial Average, S&P 500 Index and Nasdaq Composite Index all set new marks last week, there were no shortage of studies released that crunched data going back to the 1920s to prove that purchasing stocks when indexes hit record highs generates better risk-adjusted returns than simple buy-and-hold strategies. As Meb Faber — the chief investment officer at Cambria Investment Management, who conducted one of the studies — pointed out, while buying at the highs isn’t really “a system anyone would want to implement,” the data is “an acknowledgement that all-time highs are nothing to be afraid of.”The thing is, despite the recent surge in markets, it appears that plenty of investors are afraid. Rather than going all-in on stocks for fear of missing out, investors are showing almost unprecedented restraint. Money continues to pour into money-market funds, with assets standing at $3.51 trillion as of last Wednesday, up from $3.05 trillion at the start of the year, according to the Investment Company Institute. At the same time, they have pulled $267 billion from equity funds year to date.Put another way, almost half a trillion dollars have been put into cash even as the MSCI USA Index of equities jumped 23.5% this year through Friday. The last time so much money went into cash was in 2008 as the financial crisis was heating up, and it’s a marked difference from 2013, the last time stocks were having a good as year as this one. Back then, money funds only attracted $28 billion.Money funds aren’t the only sign of significant investor caution. Notably, State Street Global Markets’ monthly index — which is derived from actual trades and covers 15% of the world’s tradeable assets — shows that investors this year have been less confident in the outlook for equities than even during the financial crisis.It’s good to see investors showing so much discipline, especially with valuations on the high side. The S&P 500 is trading at 17 times the following year’s projected earnings. That ratio has been higher only once since the economy began to recover from the financial crisis, and that was during late 2017, just before the S&P 500 took a nasty fall, declining 10% over the course of a few weeks in late January and early February 2018.Perhaps the caution is a sign that investors know a trade detente only brings a new set of issues to the forefront. The first is whether equities can keep rising if an agreement only reinforces the notion that the Federal Reserve is done cutting interest rates and may even start talking about boosting them sooner rather than later. In the absence of earnings growth, a strong case can be made that the only reason stocks have managed to rally is because of the Fed’s dovish pivot earlier this year and three subsequent rate cuts. Based on fed funds futures, traders aren’t convinced the central bank will ease monetary policy further any time in the next two years.The second is whether the economy can pick up enough to allow companies to meet lofty earnings estimates for next year. Although analysts have slashed their fourth-quarter earnings forecasts for members of the S&P 500 to an average decline of 0.3% from an increase of 7% in June, estimates for 2020 have barely budged, remaining stubbornly high at 9.7%.So while history shows there’s no reason to avoid buying stocks at all-time highs, there are always exceptions.  This could be one of them.To contact the author of this story: Robert Burgess at bburgess@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Robert Burgess is an editor for Bloomberg Opinion. He is the former global executive editor in charge of financial markets for Bloomberg News. As managing editor, he led the company’s news coverage of credit markets during the global financial crisis.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • This Insider Has Just Sold Shares In State Street Corporation (NYSE:STT)
    Simply Wall St.

    This Insider Has Just Sold Shares In State Street Corporation (NYSE:STT)

    We wouldn't blame State Street Corporation (NYSE:STT) shareholders if they were a little worried about the fact that...

  • Business Wire

    State Street Announces Strategic Partnership with FactSet to Distribute MediaStats

    State Street Corporation NYSE: STT and FactSet , a global provider of integrated financial information, analytical applications, and industry-leading service, today announced a strategic partnership to distribute the State Street MediaStats Equity Indicators on the Open:FactSet Marketplace.

  • Business Wire

    State Street Corporation Declares Dividends on its Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock Series “C,” “D,” “G,” and “H”

    State Street Corporation today announced cash dividends on each of the below outstanding series of non-cumulative perpetual preferred stock:

  • Business Wire

    State Street Corporation Announces Additional Capital Action with Full Redemption of Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock Series “E”

    State Street Corporation (STT) today announced that it will redeem all of its outstanding shares of non-cumulative perpetual preferred stock Series E (represented by depositary shares, each representing a 1/4000th interest in a share of Series E preferred stock)(the “Redemption”) on December 15, 2019 (the “Redemption Date”), for cash at a redemption price of $100,000 per share (equivalent to $25.00 per depositary share) plus all dividends that have been declared but not paid up to but not including the Redemption Date. The Redemption is in addition to State Street’s original capital plan, submitted as part of the 2019 Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review (CCAR) cycle and previously announced on June 27, 2019, and has received approval from the Federal Reserve.

  • Business Wire

    State Street Corporation Announces Results of Its 2019 Mid-Cycle Stress Test

    State Street Corporation today announced the results of its 2019 mid-cycle stress test, consistent with section 165 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

  • Business Wire

    State Street Bank and Trust Company Announces the Early Results of the Cash Tender Offer for Any and All of State Street Corporation’s Floating Rate Junior Subordinated Debentures Due 2047

    State Street Corporation (“State Street”) (STT) today announced that, pursuant to the previously announced cash tender offer (the “Tender Offer”) by its principal banking subsidiary, State Street Bank and Trust Company (the “Bank”) for any and all of the outstanding Floating Rate Junior Subordinated Debentures due 2047 listed in the table below (the “2047 Debentures”), which were issued by State Street, approximately $289.8 million in aggregate principal amount of the 2047 Debentures were validly tendered and not validly withdrawn on or prior to 5:00 p.m., New York City time, on November 1, 2019 (the “Early Tender Deadline”). The terms of the Tender Offer are described in the Offer to Purchase, dated October 21, 2019 (the “Offer to Purchase”) and remain unchanged.

  • Business Wire

    Charles River Wins Best Integrated Front Office Platform at Buy-Side Technology Awards

    Charles River Development, a State Street Company, today announced that the Charles River Investment Management Solution was awarded “Best Integrated Front Office Platform” by WatersTechnology Buy-Side Technology Awards 2019.

  • Fed's 'Good Place' Is No Happy Place for Stocks
    Bloomberg

    Fed's 'Good Place' Is No Happy Place for Stocks

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- That was quick. It took less than 24 hours for markets to start second-guessing Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell, who said on Wednesday that monetary policy is in a “good place” to keep the economy growing moderately. And yet, the S&P 500 Index fell on Thursday, dropping the most in three weeks at one point and indicating doubts among traders that the economy is anywhere but a good place. Sure, the S&P 500 set another new all-time high this week, but broader measures of equities are well below their records. The New York Stock Exchange Composite Index is down 3.68% from its high reached in January 2018, while the Russell 2000 Index is 11.3% below its record set in August 2018. The trigger for the declines Thursday was a Bloomberg News report that  Chinese officials are casting doubts about reaching a comprehensive long-term trade deal with the U.S. even as the two sides get close to signing a “phase one” agreement. That shouldn’t be a total surprise, though, as many traders have speculated that the impeachment hearings against President Donald Trump provide China with little incentive to a broad agreement. What was surprising was the MNI Chicago Business Barometer index, which fell to 43.2 for October from September’s 47.1 when it was forecast to rise to 48. That’s a big miss. Then, the weekly Bloomberg Consumer Comfort Index fell the most in eight years, possibly signaling more moderate household spending approaching the holiday-shopping season. If that wasn’t enough, the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta’s widely-follow GDPNow index that aims to track the economy in real time fell to a paltry 1.46% rate.It’s hard to criticize Powell. All else being equal, it’s better for business, consumer and investor confidence to have an optimistic central banker than one who is pessimistic. That said, it’s also good to have a central banker who doesn’t seem out of touch with reality. We’ll find out soon enough where Powell stands, with a pair of high-level economic data points scheduled to be released Friday in the form of the monthly jobs report and the Institute for Supply Management’s manufacturing index.HOW LONG  OF A PAUSE?The bond market sure isn’t acting like the bar to further rate cuts is very high. After falling 4 basis points on Wednesday, yields on benchmark two-year Treasury notes dropped an additional 7 basis points to 1.53% on Thursday. The probability of another rate reduction happening at the central bank’s next policy meeting in December stands at a not-so-insignificant 30%, which is higher than where it was a month ago, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Plus, at about 16 basis points, the gap between two- and 10-year yields is lower now than where it was before the Fed started cutting rates at the end of July. If the so-called yield curve really is a reflection of where the economy is headed, then the flattening is a sign that the bond market believes that the Fed’s three rate cuts have done nothing to spark growth. “We do not think the worst of the downside risks for the Fed have passed yet,” said Wells Fargo Securities strategist Erik Nelson.STOCKS HAVE A NEW LEADERThe U.S. economy has been described as the cleanest of the dirty shirts. In other words, while growth has slowed rapidly in the U.S., it’s still a lot better than most anywhere else in the developed world. If the recent performance of the global stock market is any indication, that narrative may be about to change. In late trading Thursday, the MSCI All-Country World Index excluding the U.S. was up 3.35% for the month of October, while the MSCI USA Index was up just 2.06%. It’s the greatest outperformance by the non-U.S. gauge since December. And while the latest monthly sentiment indexes from State Street Global Markets released Wednesday showed investors’ attitudes toward U.S. equities are languishing near all-time lows, those toward European stocks have rebounded and are approaching record highs. In that sense, the global stock market may be signaling that it doesn’t expect U.S. economic growth to get much worse, but rather growth in the rest of the world may have stopped slowing and will catch up with the U.S.RAW MATERIALS ARE HOPPINGCommodities are another market that may be signaling that the outlook for the global economy isn’t all that bad. The Bloomberg Commodity Index posted its first back-to-back monthly increase in September and October since January and February. The gains have been broad-based, with the energy, agriculture and industrial metals sectors all rising for the month. The World Bank isn’t too optimistic the gains will continue. The organization on Tuesday cut its price forecast for commodities, saying slower global growth will sap demand for energy, metals and crops. “Expectations for global growth both for 2019 and 2020 have been revised down substantially, including in emerging market and developing economies,” the World Bank said in the report. To be sure, such organizations don’t have the greatest track records in making forecasts, often reacting to the data instead of anticipating trends the way markets do.SHADOW ECONOMY SHRINKSIt didn’t get much attention, but the International Monetary Fund came out with a blog post this week looking at the “global informal”  or “shadow” economy. This is activity that falls outside the regulated economy and tax system, such as street vending or unregistered taxi drivers. The author, IMF senior economist Thomas Alexander, points out that this part of the economy is hard to measure since participants usually operate on a small scale. Nevertheless, Alexander concludes that the informal economy has steadily shrunk as a percentage of gross domestic product in every part of the world since the early 1990s. In the OECD countries, it’s down to about 15% from 20% almost 30 years ago. The glass-half-full take is that this means the global economy is structurally better, given that the informal economy is generally associated with low productivity, poverty, high unemployment and slower growth. The downside is that it provides opportunities to those who might not otherwise find employment. So, fewer opportunities in this part of the economy may make it harder for many to escape poverty.TEA LEAVESThe Labor Department is expected Friday to say the U.S. economy added 85,000 jobs in October, down from 136,000 in September, according to the median estimate of economists surveyed by Bloomberg. The reality, though, is that the actual results have just as much chance as exceeding the median estimate as falling below. The top-ranked interest-rate strategists at BMO Capital Markets pointed out in a research note Thursday that five proxies they use to track the health of the labor market are positive, while five are negative. As they explain, the Fed’s third rate cut since July on Wednesday wasn’t meant “to offset weakness in the labor market but rather to get ahead of any cracks that may appear in coming months. As such, we expect Friday’s payrolls report to confirm that a stable job market continued through October, even if the trade war is beginning to impede hiring across sectors.” But if the labor market continues to slow, it would put pressure on the Fed to cut rates again in December, despite Powell signaling that policy makers are unlikely to do so.DON’T MISS A Bright Spot for the U.S. Economy? This Is It: Robert Burgess Futures Are Pulling Cryptos Out of the Dark: Aaron Brown Powell Will Need a Horror Show to Cut Again: Authers' Newsletter The Federal Reserve Puts Monetary Policy on Pause: Editorial Lagarde’s Task Is to Lead a Cultural Revolution: EditorialTo contact the author of this story: Robert Burgess at bburgess@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Robert Burgess is an editor for Bloomberg Opinion. He is the former global executive editor in charge of financial markets for Bloomberg News. As managing editor, he led the company’s news coverage of credit markets during the global financial crisis.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The OUTstanding Top 50 LGBT+ Ally Executives
    Yahoo Finance UK

    The OUTstanding Top 50 LGBT+ Ally Executives

    All of the allies — who must be senior executives who are not LGBT+ but support LGBT+ inclusion — were nominated by peers and colleagues, or put themselves forward.

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