TCG.L - Thomas Cook Group plc

LSE - LSE Delayed price. Currency in GBp
3.4510
0.0000 (0.00%)
As of 4:37PM BST. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous close3.4510
Open3.9900
Bid0.0000 x 0
Ask0.0000 x 0
Day's range2.0001 - 3.9900
52-week range2.0000 - 55.2500
Volume145,391,176
Avg. volume43,136,384
Market cap53.002M
Beta (3Y monthly)N/A
PE ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target estN/A
  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 1-Travel firm Thomas Cook gets non-binding offer for Nordic operations

    Thomas Cook, the world's oldest travel firm, has received a non-binding bid for its Nordic operations, a spokesman said on Friday. "The bid that has been placed is for the whole Nordic operations, which is Thomas Cook Northern Europe plus the Nordic airline," said Fredrik Henriksson, head of communications at Thomas Cook Northern Europe/Ving.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 2-Dart Group sees demand boost after Thomas Cook collapse

    Dart Group, the owner of British airline and tour operator Jet2, raised its profit guidance on Friday as it boosted passenger numbers following the collapse of former rival Thomas Cook last month, sending its shares soaring almost 13%. Dart, which runs package holiday company Jet2holidays, said it had received good levels of late season bookings in its leisure travel business, with strong demand for its flight-only and package holiday products. Thomas Cook, the world's oldest travel company whose shops have been a feature of British town centres for generations, collapsed last month, stranding tens of thousands of passengers as its UK business went into liquidation.

  • Thomas Cook UK Shops Sold to Retail Rival Owned by Husband-and-Wife Team
    Skift

    Thomas Cook UK Shops Sold to Retail Rival Owned by Husband-and-Wife Team

    A travel agency chain based in the north of England will snap up all of Thomas Cook’s 555 retail shops, potentially saving thousands of jobs. Sunderland-headquartered Hays Travel has agreed to a deal with those in charge of the Thomas Cook liquidation. A spokesperson for the Insolvency Service declined to say how much Hays Travel […]

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 2-Reprieve for Thomas Cook's UK stores as Hays Travel deal saves up to 2,500 jobs

    Hays Travel will buy all of Thomas Cook's British travel agent shops, potentially saving up to 2,500 jobs and providing a rare boost for high streets across the country. Thomas Cook, the world's oldest travel company whose shops have been a feature of British town centres for generations, collapsed last month, stranding tens of thousands of passengers as its UK business went into liquidation. Hays Travel will buy all 555 stores as part of a deal brokered by insolvency advisers KPMG, and the privately-owned travel firm will look to re-employ former employees from Thomas Cook's retail operations.

  • Up to 2,500 jobs saved as Hays Travel buys 555 Thomas Cook shops
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Up to 2,500 jobs saved as Hays Travel buys 555 Thomas Cook shops

    The country's largest independent travel agent has already hired over 400 former Thomas Cook employees.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Easyjet is looking at Thomas Cook assets, CEO tells paper

    Easyjet is looking at some of collapsed travel firm Thomas Cook's assets, the airline's Chief Executive Johan Lundgren told German newspaper Die Welt. "Of course, like all airlines and tour operators, we will look at what might be of interest to us from the Thomas Cook network. Lundgren also told Die Welt that he was not interested in buying rival airline Condor.

  • Thomas Cook passengers could wait two months for refunds
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Thomas Cook passengers could wait two months for refunds

    A total of 360,000 holidays are said by the CAA to be eventually refunded.

  • Debt, Egos and Bad Decisions: How Thomas Cook Failed to Adapt to a New Era of Travel
    Skift

    Debt, Egos and Bad Decisions: How Thomas Cook Failed to Adapt to a New Era of Travel

    On March 1, 2013, Thomas Cook announced the formation of a new digital advisory board to help management identify “the leading-edge trends for online businesses”. It included a number of Thomas Cook’s senior leadership team, including the then-CEO Harriet Green, who now works at IBM, as well as a selection of outside digital gurus who […]

  • Thomas Cook CEO 'told staff to ignore media noise' before its collapse
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Thomas Cook CEO 'told staff to ignore media noise' before its collapse

    Cabin crew accused Peter Fankhauser of giving them 'false hope' as Thomas Cook's former leaders face growing anger over its collapse.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    UPDATE 1-UK's business committee to investigate Thomas Cook collapse

    The British parliament's business committee has launched an inquiry into the collapse of travel group Thomas Cook and will seek to question the management over issues such as executive pay and accounting practices.

  • UK's business committee to investigate Thomas Cook collapse
    Reuters

    UK's business committee to investigate Thomas Cook collapse

    The British parliament's business committee has launched an inquiry into the collapse of travel group Thomas Cook and will seek to question the management over issues such as executive pay and accounting practices.

  • Gambia fears tourism crisis after Thomas Cook collapse
    Reuters

    Gambia fears tourism crisis after Thomas Cook collapse

    Fatou Jallow borrowed money this year to spruce up her beachside restaurant in Gambia, expecting the usual winter droves of European tourists keen to sample her hearty stews and spicy West African rice dishes. Then Monday's news hit: Thomas Cook Group , the travel operator that brought around 40% of Gambia's annual visitors seeking sun and white-sand beaches, had collapsed and was cancelling all future flights and hotel bookings. The fallout is global, with tourists and tourist destinations affected in North America, Europe, India and Africa.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    German court begins protection proceedings for Thomas Cook's Condor

    FRANKFURT/MUNICH, Sept 26 (Reuters) - Germany's Condor, which is owned by British travel operator Thomas Cook, said on Thursday that a Frankfurt court had begun investor protection proceedings that should allow the airline to be restructured. Thomas Cook, the world's oldest travel firm, collapsed this week, sparking a scramble for survival among many of its subsidiaries. Germany said on Tuesday it would guarantee a 380 million euro ($419 million) bridging loan for Condor to enable it to continue flying and save jobs.

  • Bloomberg

    Thomas Cook’s Lenders Face Lengthy Wait For Tiny Payout

    (Bloomberg) -- Thomas Cook Group Plc’s grounded planes ruined thousands of holidays. They’re also likely to disappoint creditors waiting to get some of their money back after liquidators sorting through the company’s wreckage sell them off.The travel group’s compulsory liquidation this week put it under the control of a government-appointed receiver and consultants AlixPartners and KPMG. They’re responsible for stripping the company down into sellable parts in order to return as much cash as possible to creditors.There won’t be much though. An analysis by AlixPartners in August estimated bondholders could get as little as 2% of their money. The assessment was less gloomy for lenders, who may enjoy a recovery rate of almost 17%. But even that assumes the receiver can sell Thomas Cook’s assets at a decent price, which may be difficult.S&P Global Ratings on Tuesday put the recovery value as high as 10% on the group’s unsecured bonds but warned investors could also get nothing. Creditors will be competing with other claims on funds including aircraft financing contracts and pension obligations, according to the ratings firm.At the time of Thomas Cook’s liquidation in the early hours of Monday, the travel agent was operating almost 120 planes and held more than 1,500 weekly airport slots in Britain, Germany and Scandinavia.But most of Thomas Cook’s planes are leased from other companies. AlixPartners said Thomas Cook and its subsidiaries, some of which are still operating, owned just 22 aircraft, but those are mostly old and may not fetch much of a price, according to Neill Keaney, a senior analyst at CreditSights. Based on data from aviation consultancy Cirium, Thomas Cook’s aircraft “will probably yield less than 100 million pounds.”Landing rights could be another source of cash. S&P says it’s hard to assess their value, but liquidators could auction some of Thomas Cook’s 208 weekly peak-season slots at London’s crowded Gatwick Airport, among the most sought-after in Europe.U.K. carrier Monarch Airlines won the right to exchange landing permits in the wake of its own 2017 collapse after winning a court case. Selling airport slots may not be possible in locations where landing rights revert back to the aviation authority when an airline ceases to operate.Thomas Cook’s global reach adds a further complication as multiple jurisdictions will need to recognize the U.K. insolvency process.Other potential sources of funds to repay lenders include receivables -- or money owed to the firm -- inventories and cash paid on deposit for holiday bookings, according to S&P.Thomas Cook’s hotels may also hold some worth. The company has invested in resorts like the Aldiana chain and launched the upmarket Casa Cook brand with a boutique hotel opened in Ibiza only two months ago.Airline Condor, which is partially owned by Thomas Cook, continues to fly after receiving a rescue loan from the German government. The firm’s Scandinavian tour operators and air carrier are also still operating.The liquidators are unlikely to extract much value from Thomas Cook’s brand even if the name dates back 178-years. Hundreds of thousands of stranded customers have left a publicity disaster that may rule out any sale. Fitch said on Tuesday that Thomas Cook and other brands have “little or no value” in liquidation.Creditors also face a long wait to find out how much money they’ll recover if other recent U.K. liquidations are anything to go by.Almost two years after the collapse of builder Carillion in January 2018, its lenders are still waiting for their first payouts from the liquidation.“Disentangling complex businesses like Carillion and Thomas Cook takes time,” said Julie Palmer, managing partner at restructuring specialist Begbies Traynor. “It will be a slow operation that will require years.”\--With assistance from Christopher Jasper, Antonio Vanuzzo, Richard Weiss and Siddharth Philip.To contact the reporters on this story: Luca Casiraghi in London at lcasiraghi@bloomberg.net;Irene García Pérez in London at igarciaperez@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Vivianne Rodrigues at vrodrigues3@bloomberg.net, Chris VellacottFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Thomas Cook staff fear for their homes as they head to Jobcentres
    Yahoo Finance UK

    Thomas Cook staff fear for their homes as they head to Jobcentres

    Cabin crew hit out at bosses' pay and a lack of government support as they search for work after suddenly losing their dream jobs.

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Thomas Cook collapse to cost Morocco hotels $20 mln -tourism body

    The collapse of British travel operator Thomas Cook has left Moroccan hotels facing unpaid bills of about 200 million dirhams ($20 million), the head of Morocco's tourism federation said on Wednesday. Thomas Cook operated two flights a week from Manchester to Marrakech and dealt with some 50 hotels in Marrakech and Agadir. Morocco's tourism industry had 2018 revenue of 73.2 billion dirhams, a key source of hard currency for the country.

  • Thomas Cook collapse prompts international response
    Reuters

    Thomas Cook collapse prompts international response

    Thomas Cook's German tour business filed for insolvency on Wednesday in a move aimed at separating its brands and operations from its failed parent, and it said it was in talks with potential new investors. The German regional state of Hesse, which is also providing help to Condor, said it stood ready to offer financial assistance to Thomas Cook GmbH, and would discuss the matter with the federal government. Thomas Cook has said there are roughly 140,000 holidaymakers currently travelling with its German units.

  • What will the Thomas Cook news mean for the TUI share price?
    Fool.co.uk

    What will the Thomas Cook news mean for the TUI share price?

    With the collapse of its rival, will TUI shares see the benefit long term?

  • Thomas Cook Germany in rescue talks with investors
    Reuters

    Thomas Cook Germany in rescue talks with investors

    Thomas Cook's German tour business filed for insolvency on Wednesday in a move aimed at separating its brands and operations from its failed parent, and said it was in talks with potential new investors. The German government said it was considering an application for a bridging loan from Thomas Cook Germany, a day after it said it would guarantee a 380 million euro (£336.1 million) bridging loan for the British group's German airline, Condor. Thomas Cook, the world's oldest travel firm, collapsed earlier this week, sparking the largest peacetime repatriation effort in British history and a scramble for survival among many of its subsidiaries.

  • Thomas Cook’s German Airline Gets $420 Million State Lifeline
    Bloomberg

    Thomas Cook’s German Airline Gets $420 Million State Lifeline

    (Bloomberg) -- German airline Condor’s request for emergency financing was granted by Chancellor Angela Merkel’s government in a bid to get the tourist carrier through the winter after the demise of U.K. parent Thomas Cook Group Plc.The bridging loan worth 380 million euros ($420 million) must be approved by the European Commission and will be valid for six months, according to the airline, which has around 5,000 employees. Some 240,000 tourists are currently relying on Condor to get back to Germany from vacation, Germany’s Economy Ministry said.The government is in “constructive talks” with the EU executive on the loan, the ministry said in a statement late Tuesday, adding that Condor should also be protected from Thomas Cook’s creditors. The Commission said Wednesday its in “close and constructive contacts with the German authorities.”“We are a healthy company, and the liquidity we generated has in the past been buried at the parent company,” Condor Chief Executive Officer Ralf Teckentrup told reporters Tuesday. “This bridge loan will take us through the coming winter. In summer, an airline like us needs no such bridge loan.”Thomas Cook filed for liquidation in the U.K. on Monday, though some profitable parts of the group are still fighting for survival.German BrandsThe company’s German tour operator Thomas Cook GmbH -- with brands including Neckermann, Bucher and Oeger -- filed for insolvency Wednesday to separate itself from liabilities associated with the liquidation of the parent, a prerequisite for a court-led restructuring. The units are profitable and still have a chance to continue in business, the operator said, adding that a court will appoint an expert to restructure them.An Economy Ministry spokeswoman said later on Wednesday that the operator has asked for a bridging loan of its own and the request is being assessed by government agencies. She declined to give further details.Zurich Insurance Group AG is the provider of insolvency insurance for the German business and will pay for hotels and flights as customers are repatriated, travel association DRV said.Meanwhile, Thomas Cook’s Nordic Ving unit said Tuesday that it and airline Thomas Cook Airlines Scandinavia are not included in the parent’s bankruptcy and continue operations as an independent company. That also applies to other Nordic entities in the Thomas Cook Northern Europe unit, such as Spies, Tjareborg and Globetrotter, Ving said.Condor operates 59 of the group’s more than 100 aircraft, and Teckentrup said he is hopeful the unit can find a new home. The bridge loan will protect “many” of the jobs at Condor, Economy Minister Peter Altmaier told reporters in Berlin Tuesday.“Condor is a profitable company, so our decision is based solely on its business, and not on political criteria,” Altmaier said.The German state of Hesse, where Condor has its headquarter, said it will take on 50% of the risk that the federal government is assuming by providing a state guarantee of 190 million euros.Air Berlin, once Germany’s second-largest airline, was liquidated in 2017 despite the government stepping in to help with a bridge loan of 150 million euros. The airline’s administrators said his month that the loan had been paid back in full.“We’re a different case than Air Berlin,” Teckentrup said.(Adds German unit’s loan request in eighth paragraph)\--With assistance from Birgit Jennen, Niklas Magnusson, Aoife White and Arne Delfs.To contact the reporters on this story: Richard Weiss in Frankfurt at rweiss5@bloomberg.net;Patrick Donahue in Berlin at pdonahue1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Daniel Schaefer at dschaefer36@bloomberg.net, Iain Rogers, Chris ReiterFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

By using Yahoo, you agree that we and our partners can use cookies for purposes such as customising content and advertising. See our Privacy Policy to learn more