TII.DU - TEXAS INSTR. DL 1

Dusseldorf - Dusseldorf Delayed price. Currency in EUR
111.98
+0.78 (+0.70%)
At close: 7:50PM CEST
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Previous close111.20
Open112.38
Bid0.00 x N/A
Ask0.00 x N/A
Day's range111.98 - 112.68
52-week range82.80 - 124.08
Volume10
Avg. volume3
Market capN/A
Beta (5Y monthly)N/A
PE ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target estN/A
  • Texas Instruments to Gain Traction With New Charger ICs
    Zacks

    Texas Instruments to Gain Traction With New Charger ICs

    Texas Instruments (TXN) recently unveils buck-boost battery charger ICs in a bid to expand presence in the medical and electronics space.

  • Better Buy: NVIDIA vs. Texas Instruments
    Motley Fool

    Better Buy: NVIDIA vs. Texas Instruments

    The semiconductor space is a hot topic these days, and for good reason. While chip sales have tended to generally fluctuate with the economy, we are entering an age dominated by high-powered silicon. As the coronavirus has accelerated trends such as working from home, telemedicine, cloud computing, the Internet of Things, and the race to 5G infrastructure, leading-edge chips are powering the most resilient parts of the economy today.

  • Texas Instruments Stock Falls 4%
    Investing.com

    Texas Instruments Stock Falls 4%

    Investing.com - Texas Instruments (NASDAQ:TXN) Stock fell by 4.41% to trade at $125.60 by 14:44 (18:44 GMT) on Thursday on the NASDAQ exchange.

  • Worried About a Weak Dollar? Here's How to Trade & Win
    Zacks

    Worried About a Weak Dollar? Here's How to Trade & Win

    The ultra-easy Fed policy and widening U.S. deficit are likely to keep the greenback subdued in this coming days.

  • Texas Instruments (TXN) Gains But Lags Market: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    Texas Instruments (TXN) Gains But Lags Market: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, Texas Instruments (TXN) closed at $132.86, marking a +1.08% move from the previous day.

  • Texas Instruments Quarterly Sales Top Analysts’ Estimates
    Bloomberg

    Texas Instruments Quarterly Sales Top Analysts’ Estimates

    (Bloomberg) -- Texas Instruments Inc. reported first-quarter revenue that beat analysts’ estimates, helped by customers stocking up on components to avoid potential supply disruptions caused by the Covid-19 pandemic. It also forecast sales that exceeded some Wall Street expectations.Chief Executive Officer Rich Templeton made a rare appearance on an earnings conference call to emphasize that the company will keep plants running and maintain spending on research and new production. The chipmaker also stuck to its pledge to return free cash flow to investors though share buybacks and dividends. The stock rose in extended trading.First-quarter net income fell to $1.17 billion, or $1.24 cents per share, from $1.22 billion, or $1.26 per share, from a year earlier. Revenue dropped 7% to $3.33 billion. That easily beat Wall Street expectations, according to data compiled by Bloomberg, although there was a wide range of forecasts.Texas Instruments said second-quarter earnings will be 64 cents to $1.04 a share, on revenue of $2.61 billion to $3.19 billion. On average, analysts predicted profit of 93 cents and sales of $3.1 billion. One analyst was looking for revenue to be as low as $2.5 billion.“With a COVID-19 recession likely upon us, and with reduced visibility of customer demand, we are using the 2008 financial crisis to model our second quarter outlook,” the company said. “To reflect the increased uncertainty, we have expanded the range of our guidance.”Texas Instruments is the first major U.S. chipmaker to report results following the lockdown of the much of the population in an attempt to contain the spread of the virus. The company’s semiconductors are in everything from dishwashers to satellites, making the business an important indicator of demand across the economy.Executives said they’re seeing short-term demand from customers building chip inventories. When that’s complete, the company expects demand to fall, and it is predicting orders will decline in May.The chipmaker is nonetheless determined to keep production running and build its own stockpile to make sure it can satisfy any snap-back in demand that happens once the pandemic has passed.“Many customers are still processing what’s happening,” said Chief Financial Officer Rafael Lizardi on the conference call. “This thing could go multiple ways in the second quarter and the third.”Under Templeton, the chipmaker has bet on expanded use of electronics in vehicles and industrial systems. Car sales have plummeted during the pandemic and production has halted at many different factories.“Automotive, industrial and consumer are the end markets most impacted by the pandemic,” Susquehanna Investment Group analyst Christopher Rolland wrote in a research note before Tuesday’s results. He cited predictions that vehicle sales will decline 11% this year and noted that economic indicators related to manufacturing are at the lowest levels since the financial crisis in 2009.Texas Instruments shares rose 2% in extended trading after closing at $106.84 in New York. The stock is down 17% this year, a steeper decline than the Philadelphia Stock Exchange Semiconductor Index. The shares have surged in the past six years, partly based on stock buybacks and dividends.“Our objective is to return all free cash flow to the owners of the company,” Lizardi said on Tuesday.(Updates with executive comments throughout)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Oil, Netflix, Chipotle earnings: What to know in markets Tuesday
    Yahoo Finance

    Oil, Netflix, Chipotle earnings: What to know in markets Tuesday

    Crude oil, Netflix and Chipotle earnings will be on investors' radars Tuesday.

  • Coronavirus, Netflix earnings, economic data: What to know in the week ahead
    Yahoo Finance

    Coronavirus, Netflix earnings, economic data: What to know in the week ahead

    Coronavirus-related developments will continue to remain top of mind for investors in a busy week ahead.

  • Broadcom Sounds Alarm on Unforeseen Tech Industry Disruptions
    Bloomberg

    Broadcom Sounds Alarm on Unforeseen Tech Industry Disruptions

    (Bloomberg) -- Broadcom Inc. warned customers they’ll need to place orders for parts at least six months ahead of time, a surprisingly long lead time that points to wider than anticipated disruptions to the tech industry’s global supply chain.Lockdowns in Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore and the Philippines are “closing or severely restricting business operations,” according to a letter to customers from Nilesh Mistry, Broadcom’s vice president of sales, dated April 13 and seen by Bloomberg News. He urged clients to put in their orders at least 26 weeks ahead of delivery -- meaning anything ordered now will get shipped right around the crucial holiday season. The typical lead time for deliveries is about two to three months.The missive from Broadcom -- which makes crucial components for Apple Inc.’s iPhone -- drives home concerns that Covid-19 is disrupting the tech supply chain well beyond China, where the novel coronavirus first emerged to impact global production lines. While China’s recovering its footing, lockdowns and quarantine orders in crucial regions such as Southeast Asia are exerting a still-unknown impact on the supply of everything from Nintendo Switches to smartphones.“Air and sea transport options have become unreliable and become more expensive and have increased delays,” Mistry wrote. His letter to customers didn’t specify which products are experiencing delayed shipments and what Broadcom’s normal lead time is between orders and delivery. “We hope that as the global community finds better methods to address the Covid-19 pandemic, the conditions will abate and we will be able to resume our normal operations.”The San Jose, California-based company declined to comment.Not Made in China Is Global Tech’s Next Big Trend: Supply LinesTerry Gou, whose Hon Hai Precision Industry Co. makes many of the world’s most recognizable consumer electronics including the iPhone, said in March China’s production restart had proven faster than expected. But he was worried that disruptions outside of China could become an issue as the coronavirus spreads globally.Broadcom is part of the same supply chain that most of the world’s chipmakers use to outsource production, testing and packaging of their products. It’s a critical link for products from mobile phones to data-center hardware. Any delays in the delivery of its semiconductors could spread throughout that supply network, potentially leading to missed launches of some of the world’s most high-profile and widely used electronic devices.Intel Corp. and Texas Instruments Inc. will report earnings next week, when they’re certain to face questions from investors about their ability to keep their factories running and fill customer orders. Products from companies such as Qualcomm Inc., Nvidia Corp. and Advanced Micro Devices Inc. are built mostly by Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co., then tested and packaged by other companies in China and Southeast Asia. Some companies perform elements of the process in-house, and a shrinking group are capable of doing all the steps themselves.Wireless customers include Apple and Samsung Electronics Co., which use Broadcom chips to add Wi-Fi and other connectivity to some of the world’s best-selling smartphones. In networking, Broadcom’s switch chips are the market leaders, going into machinery that’s used by all of the biggest equipment makers, including Cisco Systems Inc. and Huawei Technologies Co., and companies such as Amazon.com Inc. that build their own gear.Read more: Nintendo Is Likely to Suffer Global Switch Shortages From VirusOn March 12, Broadcom withdrew its annual sales forecast and gave weak near-term guidance, citing the impact of the pandemic. Chief Executive Officer Hock Tan told investors that, while fundamental demand was still strong and he hadn’t see any negative impact in the first quarter of the year, “visibility was lacking.”As part of a bond offering last week, Broadcom warned investors it was experiencing some disruption to parts of its global supply chain. In the “related risks” section of a regulatory filing, the company highlighted that a main warehouse and a number of assembly and test subcontractors are in Malaysia, which has shut down all non-essential businesses. The warehouse is fully operational, but “many of the facilities of our suppliers and service providers are not,” the company said at the time.“An extended closure of these facilities may require us to move assembly and test services to providers in other countries, and may, eventually, lead to a shortage of some components needed for our products,” Broadcom said. “In the event restrictive measures in Malaysia are intensified and our warehouse is shut down or required to operate at a reduced capacity, our ability to deliver product to our customers would be severely limited.”The test and assembly of chips includes coating them in protective plastic, adding electrical contacts that let them communicate with the rest of the device, and making sure they function. Such work is less expensive and easier to conduct than the processing of silicon wafers that make up the fundamental circuits of the chips. Much of the packaging work was shifted to countries with lower labor costs decades ago.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The Argus Research View on Texas Instruments
    Yahoo Finance

    The Argus Research View on Texas Instruments

    Texas Instruments shares dipped 1% in a down market after posting annual declines in revenue and EPS for 4Q19 but beating consensus expectations for both. The company cheered semiconductor investors when it characterized its end markets as “stabilizing,” while not expressing undue optimism about the outlook.

  • Bloomberg

    Intel’s Big Forecast Gives Chip Bulls Reason to Celebrate

    (Bloomberg) -- Intel Corp.’s better-than-expected forecasts delivered the kind of good news semiconductor investors were looking for to justify record highs.The biggest U.S. chipmaker projected revenue in the current quarter of about $19 billion, more than $1 billion above the highest analyst estimate, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Perhaps even more important for the broader industry, Intel’s data center revenue in the fourth quarter also expanded by 19%, compared with the same period a year ago. That beat the average of analyst estimates compiled by Bloomberg at 5.3%.Nvidia Corp., Micron Technology Inc. and Advanced Micro Devices all rose more than 1.5% in after-hours trading while Intel gained as much as 7.8%. The Philadelphia semiconductor index has gained more than 5% since the start of the year and closed at a fresh record on Thursday.Intel’s results came a day after Texas Instruments Inc. calmed nerves with a forecast that met estimates but failed to spark a rally.To contact the reporter on this story: Jeran Wittenstein in San Francisco at jwittenstei1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Catherine Larkin at clarkin4@bloomberg.net, Jennifer Bissell-LinskFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Texas Instruments Points to Signs of Chip Industry Revival
    Bloomberg

    Texas Instruments Points to Signs of Chip Industry Revival

    (Bloomberg) -- Texas Instruments Inc. gave a quarterly sales and profit forecast that was in line with estimates, indicating that demand from electronics makers is poised to improve amid progress resolving the China-U.S. trade dispute.First-quarter earnings will be 96 cents a share to $1.14 a share, on revenue of $3.12 billion to $3.38 billion, the Dallas-based company said Wednesday in a statement. On average, analysts predicted profit of $1.04 a share and sales of $3.2 billion, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.Texas Instruments has the biggest customer list and widest product range in the semiconductor industry, making its earnings an indicator of demand across the economy. The company has told investors the electronics business is in the middle of a typical cyclical decline after companies ordered too many parts last year. Such gluts typically last five quarters. In Wednesday’s report, which also included fourth-quarter results, Texas Instruments posted its fifth consecutive period of year-over-year revenue declines.“Most markets showed signs of stabilizing,” the company said in the statement.The company’s forecast for the first quarter was held back by the outlook for the communications equipment industry, which is “going down hard,” Chief Financial Officer Rafael Lizardi said during a conference call. Texas Instruments’ key industrial and automotive markets are close to returning to growth, he said.Shares fell about 1% in extended trading after closing at $133.34 in New York. Despite the revenue declines, the stock has posted a 38% gain in the past 12 months.Three months ago, Texas Instruments said that the U.S. trade dispute with China, the world’s largest market for semiconductors, was adding to customer caution. Since then the countries have signed the first part of what’s promised to be a comprehensive set of trade agreements.Like other chipmakers, the company has raised to the U.S. government the risks to the industry from the trade fight with China and the action taken against Huawei Technologies Co., the Chinese telecommunications equipment giant. The Trump administration has barred U.S. companies from doing business in many cases with Huawei, citing national security concerns.Texas Instruments generated 3% to 4% of its annual revenue in 2019 and 2018 from Huawei, one of the biggest buyers of semiconductors, the company said.On Wednesday, Texas Instruments reported fourth-quarter net income fell to $1.07 billion, or $1.12 per share, from $1.24 billion, or $1.27, in the same period a year earlier. Revenue dropped almost 10% to $3.35 billion. Analysts had estimated a profit of $1.01 a share on sales of $3.21 billion.The company’s chips perform basic functions in everything from factory machinery to mobile phones. Texas Instruments gets the biggest portion of its revenue from the industrial market and is also a major supplier to automakers and telecommunications equipment producers.(Updates with comment from CFO in the fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Ian King in San Francisco at ianking@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Andrew PollackFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Johnson & Johnson earnings, existing home sales — What to know in markets Wednesday
    Yahoo Finance

    Johnson & Johnson earnings, existing home sales — What to know in markets Wednesday

    Dow component Johnson & Johnson earnings and existing home sales for December will be the focal points for investors Wednesday.

  • Wall Street is back in love with chip stocks
    Yahoo Finance

    Wall Street is back in love with chip stocks

    Chip stocks are suddenly back in vogue. Intel’s stock rallied 7.5% in mid-afternoon trading after the company reported record third quarter profits and raised its full-year sales guidance.

  • Intel Gives Bullish Forecast on Data-Center Chip Demand
    Bloomberg

    Intel Gives Bullish Forecast on Data-Center Chip Demand

    (Bloomberg) -- Intel Corp. gave an upbeat sales and profit forecast, citing improved demand for semiconductors that power cloud-computing data centers, and shrugged off concerns that the trade dispute between the U.S. and China is hurting the electronics industry.The chipmaker late Thursday predicted fourth-quarter revenue and profit will come in ahead of analysts’ projections, sending the stock about 3% higher in after-hours trading. Intel also reported better-than-expected third-quarter results.While Intel’s peers are reporting increasing difficulties amid the China-U.S. trade standoff, the company is benefiting from a rebound in orders for the lucrative server chips that run giant data centers. Intel’s customers are buying more of its priciest chips, boosting revenue even as the number of total units sold declined slightly. The company also committed to buying back an additional $20 billion of its own stock in the next 18 months, a move that Chief Executive Officer Bob Swan said underlines Intel’s belief that investors should have more faith in its growth plan.“The headline number was impressive, ” said Stacy Rasgon, an analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein. “The controversy will come around how much of this is sustainable.”Demand for the company’s chips is “fundamentally strong,” Chief Financial Officer George Davis said in an interview. Unlike some other chipmakers, Intel isn’t seeing demand being hit by the trade tensions. Moves by some customers to stockpile chips ahead of tariffs that may increase prices doesn’t explain the majority of the improvements, he said.“China was a modest positive relative to expectations,” he said.Intel shares jumped as high as $56.95 in extended trading following the report. The stock had earlier closed at $52.23 in New York trading. Shares have gained 11% this year.Sales in the third quarter were little changed at $19.2 billion, the Santa Clara, California-based company said. Analysts on average had predicted $18 billion, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Net income was $6 billion, or $1.35 a share, compared with estimates for $1.17 a share. Gross margin, or the percentage of sales remaining after deducting the cost of production, was 58.9% in the quarter.Revenue in the current period will be about $19.2 billion, and net income will be about $1.28 a share, Intel said Thursday in a statement. That compares with average analysts’ estimates of $18.9 billion and $1.16 a share. Shares climbed about 3% in late trading.Intel’s stock price has lagged behind those of its peers in the Philadelphia Stock Exchange Semiconductor Index, which has gained 40% this year. The company has been struggling with manufacturing and supply problems and weaker underlying demand in the computer chip markets it dominates. Delays in bringing new production techniques online have given rival Advanced Micro Devices Inc. the opportunity to roll out chips that may be better than big parts of Intel’s lineup.Intel’s Swan and Davis told analysts that they haven’t seen a significant shift in the competitive environment. Swan committed to increasing the output of Intel factories next year so that customers get all of the chips they need. Shortages have been the company’s biggest problem this year, he said. The company will offer its first chip made with 7-nanometer-process technology in the fourth quarter of 2021 and is aiming to regain the lead in the introduction of new techniques.Earlier this week, Texas Instruments Inc. gave a weaker-than-expected forecast and warned that trade tension is making customers far more cautious. On Wednesday, Xilinx Inc., a maker of programmable chips, said it’s still waiting for the U.S. government to approve its application for a license to ship some products to Huawei Technologies Co. and has been forced to exclude all revenue from the Chinese company from its financial targets.Intel’s Xeon processors account for more than 95% of the market for chips that run servers, the machines that provide the backbone of the internet and corporate networks. In the third quarter, the data-center division posted revenue of $6.38 billion, a gain of 4%.Intel’s data-center customers actually bought fewer chips -- volume in the division shrank 6% by units. The boost in revenue came from sales of more expensive models in the Xeon line, which lifted the average selling price by 9%.Revenue at Intel’s Mobileye automotive-chip unit surged 20% from a year earlier to $229 million. Its internet of things division, which makes chips for connected devices outside of computers and phones, had revenue of $1.01 billion, up 9.4% from the same period in 2018. Memory also improved with sales up 19% at $1.29 billion.Only its PC-chip unit had a decline, shrinking 5.1% to $9.7 billion in the recent period. Davis said that was related to Intel’s inability to meet some orders, something that the company aims to fix next year. Overall, worldwide shipments of PCs increased 1.1% in the third quarter, fueled by companies upgrading to Microsoft Corp.’s latest Windows software, researcher Gartner Inc. said earlier this month. Unit shipments climbed to 68 million units in the period that ended Sept. 30.(Updates with analyst’s comments in fourth paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Ian King in San Francisco at ianking@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Andrew PollackFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Stock market news: October 23, 2019
    Yahoo Finance

    Stock market news: October 23, 2019

    U.S. stocks rose slightly in a choppy session of trading as investors considered major corporate bellwethers’ concerns that a slowing global growth environment was crimping their quarterly earnings results.

  • Texas Instruments Sinks as Customers Cut Orders on Trade Woe
    Bloomberg

    Texas Instruments Sinks as Customers Cut Orders on Trade Woe

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Texas Instruments Inc. shares plunged the most in almost 11 years after the chipmaker gave a weaker-than-expected forecast and warned that trade tension is making customers far more cautious. The report spurred a sell off in semiconductor stocks.Investors have poured money into chip stocks this year, betting on a rebound in demand. That hasn’t happened as a U.S.-China trade war drags on, undermining economic growth. Texas Instruments, the first big semiconductor maker to report in this earnings cycle, has products in almost all markets that use electronic components, making its predictions a broad indicator.The company said most of its markets deteriorated in the quarter, with automotive and communications-equipment demand among the weakest. Companies are cutting back on orders as they wait for China and the U.S. to reach a definitive trade agreement, Chief Financial Officer Rafael Lizardi said.“Macro is weak because of trade tensions,” Lizardi added in an interview on Tuesday. “When that happens, companies pull back.”Texas Instruments shares dropped as much as 13% Wednesday. They were down 8.7% to $117.35 at 9:40 a.m. in New York. European peers also declined. STMicroelectronics NV and Infineon Technologies AG declined as much as 4.9% and 4.2% respectively before 11:30 a.m. in central Europe.Texas Instruments has more than 100,000 customers and a similar number of products, so a drop in orders signifies a weaker economy, not a loss of market share, the CFO also said.Fourth-quarter earnings will be 91 cents a share to $1.09 a share on revenue of $3.07 billion to $3.33 billion, the Dallas-based company said in a statement. On average, analysts predicted profit of $1.28 a share and sales of $3.59 billion, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. At the mid-point, Texas Instruments’ projections represents a 14% decline in revenue from a year earlier.The company had said sales declines this year were the result of torrid growth in 2018 when customers accumulated inventory they’re now working through. A normal pattern would result in five quarterly declines before the backlog is cleared. The quarterly results reported on Tuesday marked the fourth period of contraction, so Wall Street was looking for signs of improvement. That made the warning from Texas Instruments particularly disappointing.“It’s more concerning for the global growth outlook going forward,” said Logan Purk, an analyst at Edward D. Jones & Co. “It’s not good for the rest of the semiconductor space or markets in general.”The world’s sixth-largest chipmaker reported third-quarter net income fell to $1.43 billion, or $1.49 per share, from $1.57 billion, or $1.58 a share, in the same period a year earlier. Revenue dropped 11% to $3.77 billion. Analysts had estimated a profit of $1.42 a share on sales of $3.81 billion.The company gets the biggest portions of its revenue from the industrial and automotive markets where its chips provide key basic functionality such as power regulation and the translation of real-word experiences like sound and pressure into electronic signals. It’s a major supplier of parts for communications equipment such as mobile phone network base stations. Demand for that kind of chip dropped 20%, the company said.(Updates with share trading in fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Ian King in San Francisco at ianking@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Andrew Pollack, Jennifer RyanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    U.S. Semiconductor Companies Urge Trump to Hurry Huawei Licenses

    (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. semiconductor industry urged President Donald Trump to make good on his promise to ease the ban on sales to China’s Huawei Technologies Co.“We encourage prompt action to issue approvals for sales that do not implicate national security concerns, particularly where there is foreign availability for competing products,” the Semiconductor Industry Association said in a letter dated Sept. 11 to Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, which was seen by Bloomberg News. Intel Corp., Qualcomm Inc. and Texas Instruments Inc. and are among members of the association.China’s largest technology company has found itself at the center of a trade conflict between Beijing and Washington that’s weighing on the global economy.After meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping in late June, Trump said he would loosen restrictions on Huawei export licenses and that Beijing had agreed to buy more U.S. farming goods. But neither side has followed through on those pledges, and the U.S. has since increased tariffs on Chinese goods, sparking retaliation by China.In July, Trump met with chief executives from major technology companies including Micron Technology Inc. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google who asked for a timely decision on the resumption of sales to Huawei.Trade BlacklistAmerican businesses require a special license to supply goods to Huawei after the U.S. added the Chinese company to a trade blacklist in May over national-security concerns.Huawei is the third-largest buyer globally of U.S. semiconductors, the association said in the letter. Sales to Huawei of “non-sensitive” products ranging from mobile phones to smart-watches “do not implicate national security concerns,” the group said. The ban is making it more difficult for U.S. firms to compete against foreign rivals that don’t face the same restrictions, according to the letter.Delays in awarding the special licenses could weaken the U.S. semiconductor industry because it will lead to lower profits, forcing some companies to cut research and eroding their dominance in the global market, the association said.To contact the reporters on this story: Jenny Leonard in Washington at jleonard67@bloomberg.net;Ian King in San Francisco at ianking@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Murray at brmurray@bloomberg.net, Sarah McGregor, Robert JamesonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Chipmakers Tumble as Trade Tensions Add to Recent Concerns
    Bloomberg

    Chipmakers Tumble as Trade Tensions Add to Recent Concerns

    (Bloomberg) -- Semiconductor stocks tumbled in on Monday, extending a recent decline as the escalating trade war between the U.S. and China added to headwinds surrounding the sector.Chipmakers were broadly weaker, with the Philadelphia Semiconductor Index down 3.6% in its fifth straight daily decline, its longest such losing streak since October. The benchmark index has lost more than 10% over the five-day slump and trade tensions have been a primary driver of the recent decline, as many chipmakers count China as a major market or as a key part of their supply chainsAmong specific names, Intel Corp. fell 3.4% while Texas Instruments Inc. lost 3.3%; both were in their fifth straight negative session. Micron Technology Inc. was off 5% and Nvidia Corp. sank 5.9%. The VanEck Vectors Semiconductor ETF -- an exchange-traded fund that tracks a basket of chipmakers -- fell 3.2%, and its pre-market trading volume was the highest since May 31, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.Also in focus on Monday was the latest data from the Semiconductor Industry Association, which showed total semiconductor sales fell 17.7% in June.RBC Capital Markets said that within the sub-sector of DRAM memory chips, average selling prices were down 46% in June, “the worst decline since March of 2008.”Analyst Mitch Steves wrote that he was “surprised to see the severity of ASP declines across the board,” although he doesn’t think they are likely to get worse from current levels.While the SIA data showed month-over-month growth of 4.9%, Deutsche Bank described the report as “another soft month of data” and said it came in below the bank’s expectations. The firm affirmed its cautious stance on the sector, with analyst Ross Seymore writing that “headwinds continue in the semi space, corroborated by weak SIA data & 2Q prints/3Q guides in earnings season thus far.”Among notable results, Advanced Micro Devices Inc. cut its full-year forecast last week, while Qualcomm Inc. gave a disappointing fourth-quarter sales outlook. On the upside, Western Digital Corp. reported fourth-quarter revenue that missed expectations, but the company’s chief executive officer said it had “reached a cyclical trough.”Over the weekend, ON Semiconductor Corp. reported second-quarter revenue that missed expectations and gave a weak third-quarter outlook. The stock slumped 9.9% in its biggest one-day drop since November 2015.(Update share prices, adds Nvidia in third paragraph)To contact the reporter on this story: Ryan Vlastelica in New York at rvlastelica1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Catherine Larkin at clarkin4@bloomberg.net, Will DaleyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Sluggish Car Sales Slow Down Chipmakers as Trade Woes Escalate
    Bloomberg

    Sluggish Car Sales Slow Down Chipmakers as Trade Woes Escalate

    (Bloomberg) -- Semiconductor companies are wincing as consumers around the globe are buying fewer cars amid continuing trade tensions between the U.S. and China.China has been a pain point for the sector as the two countries continue to spar on trade, and chipmakers had braced for slumping demand in the country to dent performance. The automotive sector has emerged as one of the biggest sources of weakness and is now threatening to dampen the chances of a recovery in the latter half of the year.It has so far been an unfortunate year for automakers, as global sales shrank 6.5% from a year earlier in the first quarter of 2019, and 7% in the next three months, according to Bloomberg Intelligence. China led the decline with car sales in the country falling for 12 consecutive months through June, amid slowing economic growth, trade-related turmoil, and a weak consumer demand, exacerbated by newer and stricter emissions rules. With the U.S. and China ratcheting the turmoil up a notch this week, some say the risks of tariffs on auto imports is now higher.Many auto parts suppliers, as well as Ford Motor Co., have reported disappointing results and issued weak forecasts for the year, citing the China slowdown. And now the effect is rippling through the rest of the supply chain, hurting chipmakers and other industrial manufacturers.“China weakness was expected, but in all honesty, we were expecting a trade deal by now,” Piper Jaffray & Co. analyst Harsh Kumar said in an interview. Kumar, who covers semiconductor stocks, said the companies supplying the automotive market were still seeing growth in radar and electrification-related products, while the traditional, gas engine segment is getting hit hard.Most of the automotive chip manufacturers have a larger piece of their business associated with traditional auto, and “that is not doing so well because there isn’t any market share or penetration to be gained; it is simply a units game,” Kumar said, referring to the fewer number of cars being sold.Maxim Integrated Products Inc., which makes chips that are used in various parts of a car including lighting, infotainment and driver assistance systems, said it expected the calendar third quarter to be slow, due to a “soft environment” for automotive production. The company’s battery management systems used in electric vehicles will also have fewer shipments, given the market uncertainty in China, the company said.The concerns were echoed by NXP Semiconductors NV, which makes components that help a car to sense its environment and process that data. Maxim and NXP’s customers include auto suppliers such as Aptiv Plc, Lear Corp. and Visteon Corp. as well as Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV. Other chipmakers with substantial auto market exposure include Infineon Technologies AG, Analog Devices Inc., Texas Instruments Inc., and Microchip Technology Inc.Meanwhile, Rockwell Automation Inc., which counts both automotive and semiconductor sectors among its customers, saw both markets decline in the quarter ending June 30.“Overall, the combination of production cuts and reductions in component inventory is having an significant impact,” Morgan Stanley’s Craig Hettenbach, who covers semiconductors, said in an email interview. The analyst said that while the weakness is most pronounced in China, Europe has also been below expectations from the beginning of the year. “There is a lot of focus on when China will provide incentives to stimulate demand, but company and investor expectations for stimulus are pretty low right now,” Hettenbach said.A respite is not expected anytime soon. According to Moody’s, global vehicle sales are expected to fall 3.8% in 2019, amid further weakening demand in China and Western Europe. The latest round of trade war-related tarriffs could make matters even worse.To contact the reporter on this story: Esha Dey in New York at edey@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Brad Olesen at bolesen3@bloomberg.net, Jennifer Bissell-Linsk, Morwenna ConiamFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Chip Stocks Hit Record as Texas Instruments Lifts Spirits
    Bloomberg

    Chip Stocks Hit Record as Texas Instruments Lifts Spirits

    (Bloomberg) -- Semiconductor stocks hit record levels on Wednesday, after better-than-expected second-quarter results from Texas Instruments Inc. boosted optimism despite a global slump in chip sales.The Philadelphia Semiconductor Index gained as much as 2.2% in its third straight positive session, aided by a 8% surge in TI, which hit records of its own.The sector was broadly higher, with almost every component of the index advancing. Among the industry’s other notable gainers, Teradyne Inc. spiked 14% after a strong sales forecast, while Micron Technology Inc. and Western Digital Corp. rose after Deutsche Bank raised its price targets on the pair.Chipmakers have been on a roller coaster ride in 2019 as investors have grappled with a trade war between the U.S. and China and lower sales. The chip benchmark suffered its worst month in more than a decade in May after a trade deal between the world’s two largest economies fell apart.Texas Instruments cited “broad-based weakness” and said that the end markets it supplies performed as expected. Asked on the earnings call about demand in China, Chief Executive Officer Rich Templeton said he saw “nothing unusual.” The Dallas-based company forecast third-quarter revenue that, at the midpoint, trailed the average analyst estimate.Semiconductor companies’ earnings and forecasts are often seen as a leading indicator of global economic growth because of the months it takes to manufacture the components and then build them into finished electronic devices. May marked the fifth consecutive month of chip sales declines, according to the Semiconductor Industry Association.(Updates shares, adds details on other movers in third paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Jeran Wittenstein in San Francisco at jwittenstei1@bloomberg.net;Ryan Vlastelica in New York at rvlastelica1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Catherine Larkin at clarkin4@bloomberg.net, Scott SchnipperFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Texas Instruments Sales Outlook Defies Trade Concerns
    Bloomberg

    Texas Instruments Sales Outlook Defies Trade Concerns

    (Bloomberg) -- Texas Instruments Inc. gave stronger-than-predicted sales and profit forecasts for the current quarter, indicating demand for chips may be starting to improve.Third-quarter earnings will be $1.31 a share to $1.53 a share on revenue of $3.65 billion to $3.95 billion, the Dallas-based company said Tuesday in a statement. On average, analysts predicted profit of $1.37 a share and sales of $3.84 billion, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. At the high end, that represents a revenue decline of 7.3% from a year earlier.A better-than-feared outlook from Texas Instruments signals that a slump in orders for electronic components may end soon and helps counter concern that the China-U.S. trade dispute will hurt the overall economy. The company hasn’t experienced any sales hit related to trade or regional differences in orders, executives said on a conference call, repeating their stance that the industry is in a typical cycle of weaker demand that usually lasts about five quarters. Texas Instruments has now reported declining revenue for three consecutive quarters.“Every cycle is unique, but if you look at at least the last two, they behave in the way where you have at least five negative quarters before growth resumes,” Chief Financial Officer Rafael Lizardi said in an interview. “I don’t know what the cycle is going to do. Our job is to be prepared.”Texas Instruments’ semiconductors are part of almost everything that has an “on” switch, making it a bellwether for industry demand. The company gets the largest chunk of its revenue from makers of industrial equipment and vehicles. The U.S.-China trade dispute had raised concern that U.S. chipmakers might be shut out of the world’s biggest market for their products.The company, which gets from 3% to 4% of its revenue from Huawei Technologies, halted shipments when the Chinese telecommunications company was blacklisted by the U.S. government. Texas Instruments resumed supplying some parts after verifying those shipments would be in compliance with the new rules, Dave Pahl, the company’s head of investor relations, said on the call.Earlier, the world’s sixth-largest chipmaker reported second-quarter net income fell to $1.31 billion, or $1.36 per share, from $1.41 billion, or $1.40 a share, in the same period a year earlier. Revenue dropped 9.5% to $3.67 billion. Analysts had estimated a profit of $1.22 a share on sales of $3.6 billion.Texas Instruments shares rose more than 6% in extended trading after closing at $120.07 in New York. The stock has gained 27% this year on optimism that the trade dispute will be resolved and inventory stockpiles will be cleared out later this year.(Updates with comments from CFO in the fourth paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Ian King in San Francisco at ianking@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Andrew Pollack, Alistair BarrFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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