TOM.DU - TOYOTA MOTOR CORP.

Dusseldorf - Dusseldorf Delayed price. Currency in EUR
54.50
+1.50 (+2.83%)
As of 7:29PM CEST. Market open.
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Previous close53.00
Open54.00
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's range54.00 - 54.50
52-week range49.20 - 65.80
Volume73
Avg. volume15
Market capN/A
Beta (5Y monthly)N/A
PE ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings dateN/A
Forward dividend & yieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-dividend dateN/A
1y target estN/A
  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Daimler AG, Tesla, Toyota, General Motors and Fiat Chrysler
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Daimler AG, Tesla, Toyota, General Motors and Fiat Chrysler

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Daimler AG, Tesla, Toyota, General Motors and Fiat Chrysler

  • Reuters - UK Focus

    Past its peak? Battered oil demand faces threat from electric vehicles

    Oil companies may be facing uncertainty as the coronavirus pandemic triggers a collapse in demand for their products, but auto makers are betting the crisis will help accelerate an electric future. With economies reeling from lockdowns to curb the virus, the sharpest plunge in oil prices in two decades has slashed the cost of filling up a tank of gas, eroding some of the incentive to make the switch to cleaner fuels. Looking ahead, cuts in capital spending forced upon energy companies as their revenues crumble could tighten supply enough to cause a spike in oil prices, making electric vehicles more attractive just as automakers ramp up production, analysts say.

  • Auto Stock Roundup: TM Beats on Q4 Earnings, HMC Incurs Loss & More
    Zacks

    Auto Stock Roundup: TM Beats on Q4 Earnings, HMC Incurs Loss & More

    Both Toyota (TM) and Honda (HMC) report dismal year-over-year results for fiscal fourth-quarter 2020, thanks to the coronavirus outbreak.

  • Japan Sinks Into Recession as Gloom Deepens for World Economy
    Bloomberg

    Japan Sinks Into Recession as Gloom Deepens for World Economy

    (Bloomberg) -- Japan has sunk into a recession that’s likely to deepen further as the full force of the coronavirus pandemic hits economies around the globe.The world’s third-largest economy shrank an annualized 3.4% in the three months through March from the previous quarter as exports slid and social distancing crimped consumer spending, official figures showed Monday, confirming the second-straight quarterly contraction.Even with a partial lifting of restrictions on economic activity in recent days, other major economies are expected to join Japan in recession in the current quarter as households limit spending to essentials and companies cut investment, production and hiring to stay afloat amid the devastating fallout of the virus.Policy makers will also need to consider more than just their approaches to restarting their economies, as the pandemic triggers a reassessment of priorities.“The post-coronavirus world won’t be a return to the pre-corona world,” said Masaki Kuwahara, an economist at Nomura Securities.“There’ll be more need to control risk for contagious diseases. And the changes won’t be limited to just contagious diseases. Various themes of sustainability will also weigh more on people’s minds,” he added, suggesting that societies may now become more tolerant of inefficiency in the economy if it results in more sustainability and safety.Worse to ComeWhile Japan’s drop in gross domestic product was slightly better than an expected 4.5% fall, helped by stronger-than-expected consumption and business spending before the pandemic escalated, analysts and policy makers agree that worse is in store in the current quarter.“There’s no doubt that this quarter has gotten much worse,” said economist Takeshi Minami at Norinchukin Research Institute, noting that Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s April declaration of a state of emergency and tougher restrictions on activity came in early April. “Companies are struggling to secure funding and that suggests business investment will remain weak and many workers are concerned about their wages.”Despite the rising sense of crisis, Japan so far appears to be doing less badly than other major economies.China, where the virus first spread, shrank 9.8% last quarter on a non-annualized basis from the previous three months. That translates into a drop of close to 40% in terms comparable with Japan’s.The U.S. economy contracted 4.8% in the first three months of the year, but is expected to shrink more than 30% this quarter in annualized terms. Canada is seen shedding more than 40% of GDP.For Japan, analysts forecast a 21.5% contraction in the three months through June, a record for official data going back to 1955.More AidThe crisis has put pressure on policy makers in Tokyo to step up stimulus measures that, at a record 117 trillion yen ($1.1 trillion), already total more than 20% of GDP by the broadest measure.Economy Minister Yasutoshi Nishimura, speaking Monday after the GDP report, said the government is aiming to pass a second extra budget swiftly to get more aid to businesses and households and warned of the risk of the economic pain deepening even more.BOJ’s Lending Under Virus Program Triples After April TweaksThe Bank of Japan last month lifted its ceiling on government bond purchases as the government ramps up spending. The BOJ is also expected to introduce another lending program for small companies at an emergency meeting that could come as early as this week.In recent days, rates of new virus infections have fallen in Japan and the government last week lifted its state of emergency for 39 of Japan’s 47 prefectures, although Tokyo and other dense economic centers still remain under heavy restrictions.Until stay-at-home requests are lifted, policy makers won’t be able to spur growth no matter how much money is spent, according to economist Taro Saito at NLI Research Institute.“For now, they have to spend money to prevent job losses and bankruptcies,” Saito said. “We’re not at a stage where the Bank of Japan can boost demand with monetary easing, and the BOJ will focus on corporate financing for now.”Export SlideJapan’s policy makers also have little control over the world’s demand for the country’s exports, a main driver of growth that could stay depressed for a long time. Even though key overseas markets are starting to reopen from lockdowns, progress will come in fits and starts, with the risk of new infection waves looming.Monday’s report showed exports dropped almost 22% last quarter on an annualized basis, the biggest decline since the 2011 tsunami. Corporate earnings forecasts from automakers and other manufacturers suggest the decline is likely to steepen. Toyota Motor Corp., Japan’s largest company, sees profits tumbling 80% this fiscal year.What Bloomberg’s Economist Says“Looking ahead, our high frequency data dashboard is pointing to more pronounced weakness in the economy in 2Q. Even if Prime Minister Shinzo Abe lifts the state of emergency by end-May, we doubt the economy will pick up until 3Q, at the earliest -- and even then, the strength would hinge on recoveries in the U.S. and Europe.”\--Yuki Masujima, economistClick here to read more.(Adds economist comments on post-virus pandemic world)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    Indonesia's April car sales plunge 91% as virus curbs hit economy

    Jongkie Sugiarto, an executive with industry association Gaikindo, said the data represented wholesale sales from manufacturers to dealers. Dealers still managed to sell some 24,000 vehicles to consumers in April, despite large-scale social restrictions imposed in some of Indonesia's biggest cities, he said, without providing a comparison. Indonesia's industry ministry last month said total car sales this year for both domestic and export markets was expected to slump 50%.

  • Japan’s Recession to Be Confirmed With Worse Yet to Come
    Bloomberg

    Japan’s Recession to Be Confirmed With Worse Yet to Come

    (Bloomberg) -- Japan’s economy has slipped from sales-tax hangover into deep recession, official data is set to show on Monday, with worse to come even as coronavirus restrictions on activity are gradually lifted.Analysts see the economy shrinking at an annualized pace of 4.5% in the first three months of this year. A 21.5% cratering of gross domestic product is then expected in the current quarter as the broader impact of the pandemic lashes the economy.Tokyo to Stay Under Virus Emergency Even as Japan EasesWhile Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s decision to partially lift a nationwide state of emergency offers hope that companies in Japan’s service sector now have a chance to start a slow recovery, manufacturers are likely in for a longer wait as global demand continues to take a battering.Aware that the economy still needs more life-support measures, Abe called Thursday for a second extra budget barely two weeks after parliament passed a beefed-up first supplementary budget. Existing stimulus measures already total more than 20% of GDP.Hopes for a V-shaped pickup for Japan should be cast aside, said Yasunari Ueno, chief market economist at Mizuho Securities Co., adding that the global recovery needed by Japan’s exporters is likely to be slow and come in fits and starts.“Any expectation that manufacturing will be a catalyst for recovery is nonsense,” Ueno said, ruling out the notion that continued social distancing measures might cause the service sector to recover at a slower pace than the factory sector.That’s bad news for Japan’s industrial heartlands, such as Aichi prefecture where Toyota Motor Corp.’s headquarter is based. Some 38% of the prefecture’s economy is based on manufacturing, compared with only 9% of Tokyo’s, where services comprise 85% of output. Manufacturers generally have more of a presence outside the greater Tokyo area.Toyota said Tuesday that it expects profit to tumble 80% this fiscal year to a nine-year low as its car sales take a bigger hit than during the global financial crisis.PMI data still shows service sector activity in a far weaker state than manufacturing, but that’s likely to change in the second quarter, according to Hiroshi Ugai, chief Japan economist at JPMorgan Chase & Co.“For Japan, exports and production will get extremely bad,” given the strict lockdowns implemented in the U.S. and Europe, said Ugai. “Companies just aren’t going to put any money into capex under these kinds of circumstances.”Ugai expects GDP to contract an annualized 42% this quarter, the bleakest forecast among 25 analysts surveyed by Bloomberg.Emergency EasedStill, lifting the state of emergency outside the main urban areas of Tokyo, Yokohama and Osaka may help improve domestic consumption, though the return to shops, restaurants and offices is likely to be cautious.Without a vaccine, Japan like other nations will face the risk of further waves of infections, and having to shut down parts of the economy as those occur, Mizuho’s Ueno said.Why a Second Wave of Covid-19 Is Already a Worry: QuickTakeFor the country’s service sector, another likely factor that could extend the recession is tourism -- previously one of the clearest success stories of Abenomics.Until last year, the number of overseas visitors to Japan had risen around five-fold over eight years. But spending by foreign tourists plunged 42% in the first quarter of 2020, according to the Japan Tourism Agency.The drop is likely to worsen in the current quarter as the pandemic has intensified. The loss will be felt especially in places outside Tokyo where overseas tourists have spent the most such as Osaka, Kyoto, Hokkaido and Fukuoka.What Bloomberg’s Economist Says“A weak report could tip the balance toward larger fiscal support in a follow-up package that appears to be in the works... Weakness was likely widespread, with private consumption, business investment, housing investment, and public investment likely all falling.”\--Yuki Masujima, senior economistClick here to read more.(Adds comments from Bloomberg economist.)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Is It Smart to Spend Billions on the Future?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Big, futuristic investment bets on the post-coronavirus period still feel too early. Yet Toyota Motor Corp. seems to be confident that the dollars will matter.That stands out in a world where most rivals can barely think about cash flows for the next six months, let alone investments a year from now. While guiding toward an 80% drop in operating profits for its 2021 fiscal year, Toyota says it plans to drop capital expenditures by around 3% and keep that spending at 1.35 trillion yen ($12.6 billion), while lowering research and development only 1%. As a portion of net revenues, R&D would rise to 4.6% to about 1.35 trillion yen, up from 3.7%, which is the average since 2017.Toyota is doing what it hasn’t during previous crises that damaged supply chains and businesses around the world. In a speech during this week’s earnings call, President Akio Toyoda recalled the four difficult years after the financial crisis, made worse in 2011 by a devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan and flooding in Thailand. The company cut costs and investments and grew substantially leaner, but “lost necessary muscle.” Toyoda said that “because we stopped everything to stop the bleeding, including investing in the future, we ended up needing some time to strengthen our company composition.”In the past couple of years, Toyota has splashed out billions on the future of cars. The investments range from $1 billion in Southeast Asia’s largest ride-hailing service, Grab Holdings Inc., the largest by an automaker, to $500 million in Uber Technologies Inc. It also has set up a joint venture with Softbank Corp. Meanwhile, the Toyota Research Institute and its Advanced Development offshoot have tried to go big into fields like artificial intelligence.So far, it’s hard to say what the exact returns have been, and it will stay that way while Covid-19 has people locked down and driving less. As long as the pandemic and its economic devastation mean lost jobs and tighter purse strings, will consumers really be ready to spend on electric cars or fancy gadgets? It seems more likely that they’ll push off upgrades for later. No one is in the mood to spend, except, well, Toyota. Sure, outlays now, in theory, set the company up to get ahead of the industry. But Toyota hasn’t necessarily shown technology prowess in the past, so it’s hard to say whether it will be able to going forward. The automaker could very well catch the future wave just right, or mistime it terribly.Corporate liquidity has become a prized commodity globally. To bolster its already-strong balance sheet, Toyota said it has signed up for a 1.25 trillion yen loan, a prudent move. But how does that square off against the planned spending, which is almost as much as in previous years? Even before the pandemic, pressure to keep up with increased connectivity and autonomy was weighing on carmakers’ balance sheets. Moody’s Investors Service noted after downgrading Toyota in April that accommodating new investments means companies “are required to save costs elsewhere.”There seem to be two Toyotas, as I have noted previously. One is focused on cost-cutting and operating within the confines of a struggling world market, and the other is trying to spend into the future. The first enables the second. Two years ago, Toyoda said that the company would hone the power of cost reduction “to strengthen earning power and expand our investments in new technology and new fields."Slimming down, especially now, is difficult. It’s unclear how Toyota classifies all of these investments, and whether they fall under R&D outlays, but costs as a portion of net sales have been edging up on a quarterly basis, despite tight control. Meanwhile, the Covid-19 production line challenges – when to stop, when to open – remain and require spending. With sales and the core business undergoing deep change, it’s hard to justify large expenditures for unknown returns. Investors may have the same problem.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Anjani Trivedi is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies in Asia. She previously worked for the Wall Street Journal. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Toyota (TM) Tops Q4 Earnings Estimates, Cautions on Road Ahead
    Zacks

    Toyota (TM) Tops Q4 Earnings Estimates, Cautions on Road Ahead

    Toyota (TM) expects operating income to decline 79.5% year over year to 500 billion yen in fiscal 2021, which would mark the lowest profit in nine years.

  • Toyota Expects Its Profit to Fall 80% in the Coming Year
    Motley Fool

    Toyota Expects Its Profit to Fall 80% in the Coming Year

    Toyota Motor (NYSE: TM) reported operating profit of 384 billion yen ($3.58 billion) for the quarter that ended on March 31, down 27.5% from a year ago, and warned that the ongoing effects of the COVID-19 pandemic could drive its operating profit down almost 80% over the next four quarters.

  • Carmakers Gear Up to Restart Production: Can They Bounce Back?
    Zacks

    Carmakers Gear Up to Restart Production: Can They Bounce Back?

    The global car industry has been witnessing a slump for the past few quarters, which was worsened due to the coronavirus outbreak.

  • Sky News

    Coronavirus: Toyota forecasts 80% drop in profit this year due to pandemic

    Toyota has warned that it expects operating profit to plunge by 80% this year due to the effect of coronavirus on car sales. Toyota, like other global manufacturers, is grappling with the economic impact of coronavirus , which has forced car factories to close and sapped demand for new vehicles. "The coronavirus has dealt us a bigger shock than the 2008 global financial crisis," Toyota President Akio Toyoda said.

  • Toyota sees 80% profit drop as virus wipes $14 billion off car sales
    Reuters

    Toyota sees 80% profit drop as virus wipes $14 billion off car sales

    Toyota Motor Corp said on Tuesday it expects profit to drop by 80% to its lowest in nine years, as Japan's biggest automaker grapples with the impact of the novel coronavirus which has sapped global demand for vehicles. The expected damage to Toyota's bottom line highlights how carmakers will struggle to recover from the virus in the coming months as they gradually restart factories after curbs on public movement prevented workers in many countries from commuting. Toyota, one of the world's most profitable automakers, expects to take a whopping 1.5 trillion yen ($13.95 billion) hit from a fall in global vehicle sales this year due largely to the virus, yet it still expects to eke out an operating profit of 500 billion yen in the year to March.

  • Exclusive: Toyota to cut North American output by 29% through October - source
    Reuters

    Exclusive: Toyota to cut North American output by 29% through October - source

    Toyota Motor Corp plans to slash production in North America by nearly a third through October due to the coronavirus crisis and expects it will take some time for output to return to normal, a person familiar with the matter said. Toyota will build about 800,000 vehicles, including its RAV4 SUV crossovers and Camry sedans, at plants in the United States, Canada and Mexico from April through to the end of October, the person told Reuters. A Toyota spokeswoman declined to comment on production plans.

  • Exclusive: Toyota to cut North American output by 29% through October
    Reuters

    Exclusive: Toyota to cut North American output by 29% through October

    Toyota Motor Corp plans to slash production in North America by nearly a third through October due to the coronavirus crisis and expects it will take some time for output to return to normal, a person familiar with the matter said. Toyota will build about 800,000 vehicles, including its RAV4 SUV crossovers and Camry sedans, at plants in the United States, Canada and Mexico from April through to the end of October, the person told Reuters. A Toyota spokeswoman declined to comment on production plans.

  • Auto Inventory Glut Sends Shockwaves Across the Industry
    Zacks

    Auto Inventory Glut Sends Shockwaves Across the Industry

    The imbalance between demand and supply of vehicles is not likely to disappear anytime soon.

  • Carmakers Dodge Disaster With Biggest-Ever Share of 0% Loans
    Bloomberg

    Carmakers Dodge Disaster With Biggest-Ever Share of 0% Loans

    (Bloomberg) -- Zero-percent financing deals hit a record last month as carmakers kept the U.S. auto market from collapsing.More than one in every four new vehicles sold in April did so with 0% loans, according to market researcher Edmunds. By opening up the lending spigots, the U.S. avoided a reprise of the almost 80% drop automakers experienced in China in February, the month the coronavirus hit the world’s largest car market hardest.Both 0% offers and longer-term loans are buoying demand at a time when large swaths of the country are under stay-home orders and many dealerships are forced to keep showrooms shut. While the Federal Reserve’s interest-rate cuts are making it easier for automakers to dangle the deals, their lenders still are forgoing revenue they’d make in more normal times.“I think 0% is an important tool in our toolbox and will continue to be offered for a while,” said Randy Parker, the vice president in charge of sales for Hyundai Motor Co.’s U.S. subsidiary. After other automakers offered no-interest financing, the company “wanted to remain competitive in the marketplace.”Hyundai’s U.S. sales fell 39% last month, while Toyota Motor Corp. and Honda Motor Co.’s both plunged by more 50%. Through May 4, the South Korean carmaker is offering zero-interest financing for seven years on the Tucson crossover and Elantra sedan, and for six years on the Santa Fe sport-utility vehicle.Toyota changed its incentive and marketing programs on April 22 to better align with deals elsewhere in the industry, including offering 0% for five years on core vehicles such as the RAV4 SUV, Camry sedan and Tacoma mid-size pickup.But it has resisted offering terms longer than 60 months, viewing that as harmful to resale values and therefore risky for car buyers. “We’re not into zero-for-84 months,” said Bob Carter, executive vice president for sales at Toyota Motor’s North American unit. “It’s not only not healthy for the industry, but also for the consumer.”Even with all the discounts, April was a painful month. Edmunds estimated industrywide deliveries fell 53% from a year ago, the worst month in at least three decades. The industry’s annualized sales rate slowed to 8.6 million, according to Ward’s Automotive Group, the worst reading in at least 45 years.“April is likely the bottom for auto sales, so hopefully there’s only room for improvement from here,” Edmunds analyst Jessica Caldwell said in a statement. “Although automakers are doing their part by offering landmark incentives, those might not be enough if consumers cannot recover financially from this crisis.”(Adds seasonally adjusted annual rate in penultimate paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    Toyota supplier Denso halves output on virus as profit hits 11-year low

    Japanese auto parts maker Denso Corp said on Thursday it has slashed global production by around 50% due to the coronavirus, adding its supply chain could be affected in the coming months if the outbreak is prolonged. Earlier in the day, the world's fourth-biggest components producer and a key supplier to Toyota Motor Corp posted an 81% drop in operating profit for the year ended March at 61 billion yen ($571.8 million), its lowest since 2009. Tumbling profits at Denso and other suppliers are a reflection of plummeting demand for cars as people have been ordered to stay indoors in many countries to control the spread of the coronavirus, leaving motorways deserted and causing deep uncertainty about the longer-term impact on the global economy.

  • Key Ford, Toyota Supplier BorgWarner to Reopen Tornado-Damaged South Carolina Plant
    Motley Fool

    Key Ford, Toyota Supplier BorgWarner to Reopen Tornado-Damaged South Carolina Plant

    Auto-industry supplier BorgWarner (NYSE: BWA) said that it expects to resume limited production at a tornado-damaged South Carolina factory in early May. The factory makes critical parts for four-wheel-drive versions of pickup trucks and SUVs made by automakers including Ford (NYSE: F), Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (NYSE: FCAU), and Toyota (NYSE: TM). The factory, in Seneca, South Carolina, suffered severe damage from a tornado strike on April 13 that killed one employee, a security guard who had been stationed outside.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Intel, Novartis, Toyota Motor, Union Pacific and Biogen
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Intel, Novartis, Toyota Motor, Union Pacific and Biogen

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Intel, Novartis, Toyota Motor, Union Pacific and Biogen

  • Top Research Reports for Intel, Novartis & Toyota
    Zacks

    Top Research Reports for Intel, Novartis & Toyota

    Top Research Reports for Intel, Novartis & Toyota

  • UAW says virus makes early May restart of U.S. auto plants 'too risky'
    Reuters

    UAW says virus makes early May restart of U.S. auto plants 'too risky'

    The head of the United Auto Workers union on Thursday said it was "too soon and too risky" to reopen auto plants and Michigan's economy in early May, citing insufficient scientific data and coronavirus testing to assure workplaces are safe. The warning from UAW President Rory Gamble on Thursday afternoon came as General Motors Co , Ford Motor Co and Toyota Motor Corp took new steps toward reopening North American vehicle manufacturing operations in an environment where consumer demand is uncertain and worker safety paramount.

  • Toyota to gradually resume North America production starting May 4
    Reuters

    Toyota to gradually resume North America production starting May 4

    The largest Japanese automaker said it expects production will be slow next month. Toyota will add temperature checks for all plant employees, personal protective gear, use "touchless" entrances and exits and will even bar non-emergency use of elevators. "There is no going back to normal for the foreseeable future," said Toyota Motor North America chief administrative officer Chris Reynolds, who said he expects production will ramp up later in May "to meet consumer demand."

  • Japanese governor pledges support for Toyota suppliers as production dips
    Reuters

    Japanese governor pledges support for Toyota suppliers as production dips

    As Toyota prepares to nearly halve production at Japanese factories, a regional governor said on Thursday he would offer 400 billion yen ($3.72 billion) in emergency loans for small and mid-size companies including Toyota's suppliers. Toyota Motor Corp's headquarters are in Aichi Prefecture, at Toyota City, which was named after the company in the 1950s to reflect its role as the biggest employer in the region.

  • Reuters

    China's BYD, Toyota's Hino partner in electric commercial vehicles

    Chinese electric vehicle maker BYD said on Thursday it has partnered with Toyota-owned truck maker Hino Motors to develop electric commercial vehicles, as BYD deepens electric collaboration with Japan's top automaker. The partnership will focus on electric buses and trucks, in addition to BYD and Toyota's joint development on electric passenger cars. Shenzhen-based BYD, which is backed by U.S. investor Warren Buffett, has been building electric commercial vehicles including London's electric double-decker buses and electric road sweepers in Beijing.

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